Daily Archives: March 30, 2017

Africa bypasses dirty electricity lines with environmental alternatives


CGTN America

Published on Mar 30, 2017

Over 600 million people across Africa, don’t have electricity. It could cost hundreds of billions of dollars, to link power lines across the continent.But some energy experts are calling for throwing out the old ‘big grid model’ altogether and leaping into a modern, environmentally-friendly system.CGTN’s Daniel Ryntjes reports.

Rising sea levels threaten $100B of US coastline


CGTN America

Published on Mar 30, 2017

California’s not short of coastline.The waves lapping at the shore may sound romantic right now, in 2017. But give it a few decades and it could be disastrous over there, inland.CGTN’s Phil Lavelle has more.

A fresh take on water health


NZ Green Party

Published on Mar 30, 2017

WAI NZ has build an amazing new device that puts science in the hands of the public, with a sensor for testing water quality in our rivers and streams.

Food-matters

Climate change and national security Col Wilkerson


Iowa99Media

Published on Oct 15, 2016

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Iowa99Media

Wilkerson: Trump’s Proposed $54 Billion Increase in the Military Budget Not for National Security


TheRealNews

Published on Feb 27, 2017

Larry Wilkerson tells Paul Jay that a massive increase in military spending is a disastrous policy, intended to serve the commercial interest of the military industrial complex, and the cuts to pay for it, are coming from all the wrong places

Ivan Eland on the environmental future of the Arctic

PBS-NOVA “The Nuclear Option” (2017 Documentary


Gelix

Published on Jan 21, 2017   Aired – January 11, 2017

A renaissance in nuclear technology grows while a crisis continues at the Fukushima nuclear plant.   How will we power the planet without wrecking the climate?

Five years after the earthquake and tsunami that triggered the unprecedented trio of meltdowns at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, scientists and engineers are struggling to control an ongoing crisis. What’s next for Fukushima? What’s next for Japan? And what’s next for a world that seems determined to jettison one of our most important carbon-free sources of energy? Despite the catastrophe—and the ongoing risks associated with nuclear—a new generation of nuclear power seems poised to emerge the ashes of Fukushima. NOVA investigates how the realities of climate change, the inherent limitations of renewable energy sources, and the optimism and enthusiasm of a new generation of nuclear engineers is looking for ways to reinvent nuclear technology, all while the most recent disaster is still being managed. What are the lessons learned from Fukushima? And with all of nuclear’s inherent dangers, how might it be possible to build a safe nuclear future?

Nuclear