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Dark Chocolate: The Bitter Truth Behind the Sweets We All Enjoy | EV & N 292 | CCTV

http://ecoethics.net/2014-ENVRE120/20181118-EV&N-292-Link.html

https://www.cctvcambridge.org/node/601003

YouTube Version

The production of chocolate from cocoa is a modern 21st century multinational industry that is based on the non-voluntary, “slave” labor of children in cocoa producing countries.  This marks an enduring legacy of patterns of the pre-colonial slave trade in West Africa and the ensuing years of colonial rule with the often brutal imposition of an export-oriented “cash-cropping” economy resting upon the production of small holder agriculturalists and share-cropping populations under their control.

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Chocolate Child Slaves- CNN


BreakingNews56
Published on Jan 16, 2012

Full article here : http://tinyurl.com/Child-Slaves-Cnn Everyone loves chocolate. But for thousands of people, chocolate is the reason for their enslavement. CNN’s David McKenzie travels into the heart of the Ivory Coast — the world’s largest cocoa producer — to investigate what’s happening to children working in the fields.

Nestle Sued by Former Child Slaves

Published on Oct 25, 2018
RT America

Just in time for Halloween, Anya Parampil brings an update regarding a legal case filed against Nestle, which alleges the company aids and abets human rights abuses and child slavery in purchasing its cocoa product from Cote D’Ivoire. Dan Kovalik, Professor of International Human Rights at the University of Pittsburgh and author of the book The Plot to Take Over the World, joins In Question to discuss the issue of child labor in the cocoa industry as Halloween fast approaches.

Nestle Chocolate Brought to You by Child Slavery


Published on Jan 16, 2014 breakingtheset

Abby Martin calls out Nestle once again, this time over the company’s commissioning of cocoa famers in Ivory Coast who force thousands of underage workers to harvest under conditions best described as child slavery.

Contrasts: Things Kids Like


phbalancedfilms
Published on Mar 27, 2013

Our mission at p.h. balanced films is to help consumers understand where their products come from and whom those products impact along the way (what’s called a “supply chain”). In looking at supply chains of various products, there are some striking contrasts between the lives of the people who use the products and the people involved in making them.

In this short film, we take a look at the contrasts that strike us in some chocolate supply chains.

You can learn more about positive changes – and remaining issues to be addressed – in the cocoa industry here: http://www.oxfamamerica.org/press/pre…

And here: http://www.greenamerica.org/about/new…

We commend Lindsey Sitz for her creative work on this piece.

How Extreme Weather Is Shrinking the Planet | Bill McKibben | The New Yorker

California is currently ablaze, after a record hot summer and a dry fall set the stage for the most destructive fires in the state’s history. Above: The Woolsey fire, near Los Angeles, seen from the West Hills.   Photograph by Kevin Cooley for The New Yorker

Thirty years ago, this magazine published “The End of Nature,” a long article about what we then called the greenhouse effect. I was in my twenties when I wrote it, and out on an intellectual limb: climate science was still young. But the data were persuasive, and freighted with sadness. We were spewing so much carbon into the atmosphere that nature was no longer a force beyond our influence—and humanity, with its capacity for industry and heedlessness, had come to affect every cubic metre of the planet’s air, every inch of its surface, every drop of its water. Scientists underlined this notion a decade later when they began referring to our era as the Anthropocene, the world made by man.

I was frightened by my reporting, but, at the time, it seemed likely that we’d try as a society to prevent the worst from happening. In 1988, George H. W. Bush, running for President, promised that he would fight “the greenhouse effect with the White House effect.” He did not, nor did his successors, nor did their peers in seats of power around the world, and so in the intervening decades what was a theoretical threat has become a fierce daily reality. As this essay goes to press, California is ablaze. A big fire near Los Angeles forced the evacuation of Malibu, and an even larger fire, in the Sierra Nevada foothills, has become the most destructive in California’s history. After a summer of unprecedented high temperatures and a fall “rainy season” with less than half the usual precipitation, the northern firestorm turned a city called Paradise into an inferno within an hour, razing more than ten thousand buildings and killing at least sixty-three people; more than six hundred others are missing. The authorities brought in cadaver dogs, a lab to match evacuees’ DNA with swabs taken from the dead, and anthropologists from California State University at Chico to advise on how to identify bodies from charred bone fragments.

For the past few years, a tide of optimistic thinking has held that conditions for human beings around the globe have been improving. Wars are scarcer, poverty and hunger are less severe, and there are better prospects for wide-scale literacy and education. But there are newer signs that human progress has begun to flag. In the face of our environmental deterioration, it’s now reasonable to ask whether the human game has begun to falter—perhaps even to play itself out. Late in 2017, a United Nations agency announced that the number of chronically malnourished people in the world, after a decade of decline, had started to grow again—by thirty-eight million, to a total of eight hundred and fifteen million, “largely due to the proliferation of violent conflicts and climate-related shocks.” In June, 2018, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the U.N. found that child labor, after years of falling, was growing, “driven in part by an increase in conflicts and climate-induced disasters.”

…(read more).

See related;

Greenland ice sheet hides huge ‘impact crater’ – BBC News

By Jonathan Amos BBC Science Correspondent
14 November 2018

What looks to be a large impact crater has been identified beneath the Greenland ice sheet.

The 31km-wide depression came to light when scientists examined radar images of the island’s bedrock.

Investigations suggest the feature was probably dug out by a 1.5km-wide iron asteroid sometime between about 12,000 and three million years ago.

But without drilling through nearly 1km of ice to sample the bed directly, scientists can’t be more specific.

“We will endeavour to do this; it would certainly be the best way to get the ‘dead fish on the table’ (acknowledge the issue, rather than leaving it), so to speak,” Prof Kurt Kjær, from the Danish Museum of Natural History, told BBC News.

If confirmed, the crater would be the first of any size that has been observed under one of Earth’s continental ice sheets.

The discovery is reported in the journal Science Advances.