China says committed to Paris accord as Trump undoes U.S. climate policy | Reuters + NPR Headline

Chimneys are seen through a window at a coal-fired power plant on a hazy day in Shimen county, central China’s Hunan Province, June 2, 2014. REUTERS/Jason Lee

China is still committed to the Paris climate change accord agreed in 2015, the Foreign Ministry said on Wednesday, after U.S. President Donald Trump signed an order to dismantle Obama-era climate change regulations.

Trump’s main target is former president Barack Obama’s Clean Power Plan, which required states to slash carbon emissions from power plants – a key factor in the United States’ ability to meet its commitments under the climate change accord reached by nearly 200 countries in Paris.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Lu Kang said climate change was a common challenge for everyone and the Paris agreement was a landmark that came about with the hard work of the international community, including China and the United States.

China is keen to be seen leading the way in reducing climate change which Trump has in the past dismissed as a “hoax”.

“We still uphold that all sides should move with the times, grasp the opportunities, fulfill their promises and earnestly take proactive steps to jointly push the enforcement of this agreement,” Lu told a daily news briefing.

“No matter how other countries’ policies on climate change change, as a responsible large developing country, China’s resolve, aims and policy moves in dealing with climate change will not change,” he added.

…(read more).

NPR Headline on China stance.

Trump makes major change to US climate change narrative – BBC News

Matt McGrath Environment correspondent

28 March 2017

“This is, I think, one of the most historic attacks on climate and environmental action that the US has ever seen,” said Liz Perera from the Sierra Club.

Her words are certain to cheer Trump supporters everywhere.

Green “job-killing” regulations limiting energy production have long been a red rag for Donald Trump, as candidate and President.

His new energy independence executive order seeks to radically change the US narrative on climate change, its causes and its importance. The best way of fighting global warming according to the new outline is to create prosperity. Environmental regulation should be about air and water. CO2, in this light, is your friend.

Supporters believe that cutting back Obama climate regulations will create thousands of jobs in the newly liberated oil and gas industries.

His opponents agree the new order will be a job creator – but they’ll be jobs for lawyers, not in the coal fields.

…(read more).

Consider as well:

The U.S. Has An ‘Active Cyber War Underway’ To Thwart The North Korean Nuclear Threat : NPR

March 29, 20171:21 PM ET
Heard on Fresh Air

New York Times reporter David Sanger talks about North Korea’s nuclear program and warns that the regime, which has been “fodder for late night comedians for many many years,” is no joke.

Future of Energy: Amory B. Lovins | Harvard University Center for the Environment

Lovin’s lecture portal:

December 3, 2008“Profitable Solutions to Climate, Oil, and Proliferation”
Amory B. Lovins, Cofounder, Chairman and Chief Scientist, the Rocky Mountain Institute

See full Future of Energy Series.

Amory B. Lovins (1947– ), an American consultant experimental physicist and 1993 MacArthur Fellow, has been active at the nexus of energy, resources, economy, environment, development, and security in more than 50 countries for over 40 years, including 14 years based in England. He is widely considered among the world’s leading authorities on energy—especially its efficient use and sustainable supply—and a fertile innovator in integrative design and in superefficient buildings, factories, and vehicles.

After two years at Harvard, Mr. Lovins transferred to Oxford, and two years later became a don at 21, receiving in consequence an Oxford ma by Special Resolution (1971) and, later, 12 honorary doctorates of various U.S. and U.K. universities. He has been Regents’ Lecturer at the U. of California both in Energy and Resources and in Economics; Grauer Lecturer at the University of British Columbia; Luce Visiting Professor at Dartmouth; Distinguished Visiting Scholar at the University of Oklahoma; Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Colorado; Oikos Visiting Professor of Business, University of St. Gallen; an engineering visiting professor at Peking U.; 2007 MAP/Ming Professor at Stanford’s School of Engineering; and 2011– Professor of Practice at the Naval Postgraduate School.

During 1979–2002, Mr. Lovins worked as a team with L. Hunter Lovins (his wife 1979–99). They shared a 1982 Mitchell Prize, a 1983 Right Livelihood Award (often called the “alternative Nobel Prize”), the 1999 Lindbergh Award, and Time’s 2000 Heroes for the Planet Award. In 1989 he won the Onassis Foundation’s first Delphi Prize for their “essential contribution towards finding alternative solutions to energy problems.” That contribution included the “end-use / least-cost” redefinition of the energy problem (in Foreign Affairs in 1976)—asking what quantity, quality, scale, and source of energy will do each task in the cheapest way. This economically based approach first permitted successful foresight in the competitive energy-service marketplace. In 1993 he received the Nissan Prize for inventing superefficient ultralight-hybrid cars (www.hypercar.com),

and in 1999, partly for that work, the World Technology Award (Environment). He also received the Heinz Award, the Happold Medal of the [UK] Construction Industry Council, the Benjamin Franklin Medal of the [UK] Royal Society of Arts (Life Fellow), and in 2007, the Blue Planet Prize, Volvo Prize, honorary membership of the American Institute of Architects, Foreign Membership of the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, Time International’s Hero of the Environment award, Popular Mechanics’ Breakthrough Leadership award, and honorary Senior Fellowship of the Design Futures Council. In 2008 he was named one of America’s 24 Best Leaders by U.S. News & World Report and Harvard’s Kennedy School, and received the first Aspen Institute / National Geographic Energy and Environment Award for Individual Thought Leadership. In 2009, he received the National Design Award and an Ashoka Fellowship, while Time named him among the world’s 100 most influential people, and Foreign Policy, one of the 100 top global thinkers. In 2011, he was co-Runner-Up for the Zayed Future Energy Prize.

In 1982, the Lovinses cofounded Rocky Mountain Institute (www.rmi.org),

an independent, entrepreneurial, nonprofit think-and-do tank. RMI’s ~80 staff drive the efficient and restorative use of resources to help make the world thriving, verdant, and secure, for all, for ever. Ms. Lovins left RMI in 2002; Mr. Lovins is now its Chief Scientist and Chairman Emeritus. The Institute’s ~$12-million annual revenue comes both from programmatic enterprise, chiefly private-sector consultancy, and from grants and donations. RMI’s balance sheet comes largely from Mr. Lovins’s having cofounded, led, spun off, and in 1999 sold (to the Financial Times group) E source, the premier source of information on advanced electric efficiency (www.esource.com).

Time to Wake Up: The Increasingly Extinct Glaciers: Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (March 2017)

The Future of Energy


GreenBiz

Published on Jan 20, 2017

Why modern renewable power doesn’t need a breakthrough in energy storage | Amory Lovins


TED Archive

Published on Feb 13, 2017

More Americans work in the booming solar or windpower industries than in the coal industry, yet renewables are often claimed to be unreliable, needing vast and costly energy storage. Amory Lovins explains why that’s a myth.
TEDArchive presents previously unpublished talks from TED conferences.
Enjoy this unedited talk by Amory Lovins.