Former NASA Astronaut Explains How Food Is Different in Space | WIRED

WIRED

Published on Jul 16, 2019

What’s different about food in space? Former NASA astronaut Mike Massimino breaks down all the differences between eating on Earth and eating in space. Is astronaut ice cream REALLY a thing? Who decides what food is brought to space? Can you eat burgers in space? Why do astronauts use tortillas instead of bread? Mike Massimino is a former NASA astronaut, senior advisor for space programs at the Intrepid Museum, and professor at Columbia University.

Survivable IPCC projections based on science fiction – reality is far worse

Nick Breeze
Published on Feb 24, 2015

The Ecologist Article Can be seen here: http://goo.gl/G9h1Gr
More posts by Nick Breeze: http://envisionation.co.uk

In the latest ‘Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 5th Assessment Report’ (IPCC AR5), there have been published a selection of ‘Representative Concentration Pathways’ (RCP’s). Dr Matt Watson, from the school of earth Sciences at the University of Bristol (UK), made this point strongly at a recent meeting at the Royal Society in London: “Why are we doing this? Why are we doing this research? This is why, this is the latest projections from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and the alarming thing is that these two scenarios [RCP 2.6 and RCP 4.5] both include negative emissions technology. So, there is geoengineering, of the flavour of carbon dioxide removal, in the best case scenarios. The very, very alarming thing for us is that we are on this path here, that is RCP 8.5. We are slap bang on this trajectory and this puts us in a very different place in our children’s lifetime.”

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Survivable IPCC projections are based on science fiction – the reality is much worse

https://theecologist.org/2015/feb/27/survivable-ipcc-projections-are-based-science-fiction-reality-much-worse

The IPCC’s ‘Representative Concentration Pathways’ are based on fantasy technology that must draw massive volumes of CO2 out of the atmosphere late this century, writes Nick Breeze – an unjustified hope that conceals a very bleak future for Earth, and humanity.

The IPPC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) published in their latest report, AR5, a set of ‘Representative Concentration Pathways’ (RCP’s).

These RCP’s (see graph, right) consist of four scenarios that project global temperature rises based on different quantities of greenhouse gas concentrations.

The scenarios are assumed to all be linked directly to emissions scenarios. The more carbon we emit then the hotter it gets. Currently humanity is on the worst case scenario of RCP 8.5 which takes us to 2°C warming by mid century and 4°C warming by the end of the century.

As Professor Schellnhuber, from Potsdam Institute for Climate Research (PIK) said, the difference between two and four degrees is human civilisation.”

In 2009 the International Union of Forest Research Organisations delivered a report to the UN that stated that the natural carbon sink of trees could be lost at a 2.5°C temperature increase.

The ranges for RCP 4.5 and RCP 6 both take us over 2.5°C and any idea that we can survive when the tree sink flips from being a carbon sink to a carbon source is delusional.

Where does this leave us?

Of the four shown RCP’s only one keeps us within the range that climate scientists regard as survivable. This is RCP 2.6 that has a projected temperature range of 0.9°C and 2.3°C.

Considering we are currently at 0.85°C above the preindustrial level of greenhouse gas concentrations, we are already entering the range and as Professor Martin Rees says: “I honestly would bet, sad though it is, that the annual CO2 emissions are going to rise year by year for at least the next 20 years and that will build up accumulative levels close to 500 parts per million.”

…(read more).

Survivable IPCC projections are based on science fiction – the reality is much worse

https://theecologist.org/2015/feb/27/survivable-ipcc-projections-are-based-science-fiction-reality-much-worse

The moon landing at 50: Neil Armstrong in his own words

60 Minutes

Published on Jul 14, 2019

In a 2005 interview, former astronaut Neil Armstrong discussed how it felt to walk on the moon, and why he shunned the fame that came from it.

Why NASA hasn’t gone back to the moon

Verge Science

Published on Jul 16, 2019

NASA has big plans to return to the Moon by 2024, and it’s banking on the historic Space Launch System (SLS) to get them there. But after years of delays and cost overruns, skeptics are questioning whether SLS should remain the biggest priority for NASA. As the 50th anniversary of the Moon landing approaches, we take a look at what the future of solar system exploration might bring.

Dr James Hansen at #COP23 interview


Nick Breeze
Published on Nov 9, 2017

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