Daily Archives: August 2, 2022

BBC World Service – Newshour, First ship carrying grain leaves Ukrainian port

“Days of Fire” author calls Cheney the “most powerful vice president” of his time

CBS Mornings – Oct 21, 2013

Peter Baker, New York Times chief White House correspondent and author of “Days of Fire: Bush and Cheney in the White House” joins the “CBS This Morning” co-hosts to talk about the evolution of the relationship between former President George W. Bush and his Vice President Dick Cheney.

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Rumsfeld in heated conversation with Al Jazeera

Al Jazeera English – Oct 4, 2011

Al Jazeera’s Abderrahim Foukara asks the former US defense secretary whether he made adequate preparations to avoid the thousands of lives lost in Iraq. Part of Donald Rumsfeld’s first interview with Al Jazeera after disparaging comments he made in 2004. He claimed then that the network’s coverage from Iraq was “vicious, inaccurate and inexcusable”. The full interview can be seen on Al Jazeera Arabic on Tuesday 4th October at 1405GMT and twice more thereafter.

Kennedy, Rumsfeld Showdown on Iraq

ABC News– Aug 26, 2009

2005: Kennedy to Rumsfeld during hearing: “Isn’t it time for you to resign?” Read more about Sen. Edward Kennedy at ABCNews.com

Errol Morris on Donald Rumsfeld: ‘One of the strangest interviews I’ve ever done’

The Guardian
– Mar 25, 2014

Errol Morris on Donald Rumsfeld: ‘One of the strangest interviews I’ve ever done’ Documentary maker Errol Morris’s latest film, The Unknown Known, is a series of interviews with former US defence secretary Donald Rumsfeld. As the film is released in UK cinemas, Morris tells the Guardian’s Andrew Pulver about Rumsfeld’s famous smile and what it’s like coming face-to-face with one of the principle architects of America’s War on Terror.

Full Cheney: Working with President Bush ‘the highlight of my career’ | Meet The Press | NBC News

NBC News -Dec 2, 2018

Dick Cheney, Secretary of Defense to President George H.W. Bush, tells Chuck Todd, “the president led the charge” after the Cold War, during an interview with Meet the Press.

‘Worse Than Watergate’ : NPR | John W. Dean

‘Worse Than Watergate’ – Dean Book Cites
Secret-Keeping at Bush White House

April 11, 200412:00 AM ET
Heard on Weekend Edition Sunday

Liane Hansen

Hear the Extended Interview with John Dean

John Dean (Little, Brown & Co.)

White House reporters ritualistically complain that every Oval Office occupant cloaks his presidency in secrecy. But different administrations manage information manipulation better than others. Bill Clinton’s White House was known as a place with so many leaks a raincoat was needed indoors. Richard Nixon was known for his obsession with secrecy to the point of paranoia.

Reporters covering the White House of George W. Bush claim that the current administration is more pre-occupied with controlling information than any of his predecessors. John Dean is familiar with the desire to protect White House secrets. In 1973, Dean revealed the deepest secrets of the Nixon White House.

In his new book, Worse than Watergate, Dean examines how the Bush administration keeps its secrets. NPR’s Liane Hansen spoke with Dean before the Bush White house released an Aug. 6, 2001 presidential daily briefing that warned Osama bin Laden was planning an attack inside the United States.

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Crimes Against Nature: How George W. Bush and His Corporate Pals Are Plundering the Country and Hijacking Our Democracy: Robert F. Kennedy Jr.

In this powerful and far-reaching indictment of George W. Bush’s White House, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., the country’s most prominent environmental attorney, charges that this administration has taken corporate cronyism to such unprecedented heights that it now threatens our health, our national security, and democracy as we know it. In a headlong pursuit of private profit and personal power, Kennedy writes, George Bush and his administration have eviscerated the laws that have protected our nation’s air, water, public lands, and wildlife for the past thirty years, enriching the president’s political contributors while lowering the quality of life for the rest of us. Kennedy lifts the veil on how the administration has orchestrated these rollbacks almost entirely outside of public scrutiny — and in tandem with the very industries that our laws are meant to regulate, the country’s most notorious polluters. He writes of how it has deceived the public by manipulating and suppressing scientific data, intimidated enforcement officials and other civil servants, and masked its agenda with Orwellian doublespeak. He reports on how the White House doles out lavish subsidies and tax breaks to the energy barons while excusing industry from providing adequate security at the more than 15,000 chemical and nuclear facilities that are prime targets for terrorist attacks.

Kennedy reveals an administration whose policies have “squandered our Treasury, entangled us in foreign wars, diminished our international prestige, made us a target for terrorist attacks, and increased our reliance on petty Middle Eastern dictators who despise democracy and are hated by their own people.” Crimes Against Natureis ultimately about the corrosive effect of corporate corruption on our core American values — free-market capitalism and democracy. It is about an administration, the author argues, that has sacrificed respect for the law, public health, scientific integrity, and long-term economic vitality on the altar of corporate greed. It is a book for both Democrats and Republicans, people like the traditionally conservative farmers and fishermen Kennedy represents in lawsuits against polluters. “Without exception,” he writes, “these people see the current administration as the greatest threat not just to their livelihoods but to their values, their sense of community, and their idea of what it means to be American.”

From Publishers Weekly

“Of all the debates in the scientific arena… there is none in which the White House has cooked the books more than that of global warming,” argues Kennedy in this harsh indictment of what he sees as the Bush administration’s assault on the environment and democracy in general. Kennedy’s investigation focuses on the undue influence of industry lobbyists (read Halliburton) on environmental standards and the government’s alleged suppression of nearly a dozen scientific reports on global warming. He maligns Bush appointees like Interior Secretary Gale Norton (“a champion of corporate welfare for three decades”) and offers a cogent analysis of Christine Todd Whitman’s departure from the EPA in 2002. Although Kennedy accuses the Bush administration of using a campaign strategy that revolves around “fear-mongering,” he uses fear to drive home his own points, noting things like the lethal mercury levels in tuna, pork industry pollution and insufficiently guarded chemical plants. Nevertheless, he competently ties the survival of democracy to sound environmental policy, contending that corporate power—particularly the power wielded by the oil, beef and lumber industries—must never supersede democratic institutions. Kennedy’s argument is strongest when he sticks to the facts and avoids making the kind of angry, sweeping statements that fill the concluding chapter (“Instead of can-do American ingenuity, this is the administration of “can’t do.” It has constructed a philosophy of government based on self-interest run riot: It has borrowed $9 trillion from our children and looted our Treasury…”). Whether or not one agrees with these accusations, Kennedy makes a passionate case for more effective environmental controls and wraps it up with a practical vision of a free-market future “in which businesses pay all the costs of bringing their products to market,” including the costs of environmental safeguards.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From the Back Cover

In this powerful and far-reaching indictment of George W. Bush’s White House, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., the country’s most prominent environmental attorney, charges that this administration has taken corporate cronyism to such unprecedented heights that it now threatens our health, our national security, and democracy as we know it. In a headlong pursuit of private profit and personal power, Kennedy writes, George Bush and his administration have eviscerated the laws that have protected our nation’s air, water, public lands, and wildlife for the past thirty years, enriching the president’s political contributors while lowering the quality of life for the rest of us.

Kennedy lifts the veil on how the administration has orchestrated these rollbacks almost entirely outside of public scrutiny — and in tandem with the very industries that our laws are meant to regulate, the country’s most notorious polluters. He writes of how it has deceived the public by manipulating and suppressing scientific data, intimidated enforcement officials and other civil servants, and masked its agenda with Orwellian doublespeak. He reports on how the White House doles out lavish subsidies and tax breaks to the energy barons while excusing industry from providing adequate security at the more than 15,000 chemical and nuclear facilities that are prime targets for terrorist attacks. Kennedy reveals an administration whose policies have “squandered our Treasury, entangled us in foreign wars, diminished our international prestige, made us a target for terrorist attacks, and increased our reliance on petty Middle Eastern dictators who despise democracy and are hated by their own people.”

Crimes Against Nature is ultimately about the corrosive effect of corporate corruption on our core American values — free-market capitalism and democracy. It is about an administration, the author argues, that has sacrificed respect for the law, public health, scientific integrity, and long-term economic vitality on the altar of corporate greed. It is a book for both Democrats and Republicans, people like the traditionally conservative farmers and fishermen Kennedy represents in lawsuits against polluters. “Without exception,” he writes, “these people see the current administration as the greatest threat not just to their livelihoods but to their values, their sense of community, and their idea of what it means to be American.”

About the Author

Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., is senior attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council, chief prosecuting attorney for Riverkeeper, and president of Waterkeeper Alliance. He is also a clinical professor and supervising attorney at the Environmental Litigation Clinic at Pace University School of Law. A former assistant district attorney for New York City, he is the coauthor of The Riverkeepers: Two Activists Fight to Reclaim Our Environment as a Basic Human Right.

  • Publisher‏ : ‎ Harper; 4th Printing edition (August 3, 2004)
  • Language‏ : ‎ English
  • Hardcover‏ : ‎ 244 pages
  • ISBN-10‏ : ‎ 0060746874
  • ISBN-13‏ : ‎ 978-0060746872
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 14.4 ounces
  • Dimensions‏ : ‎ 5.5 x 0.89 x 8.25 inches

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The Five Biggest Lies Bush Told Us About Iraq: Christopher Scheer, Lakshmi Chaudhry, Robert Scheer

The Five Biggest Lies Bush Told Us About Iraq is the comprehensive source on the administration’s campaign of disinformation before, during, and after the second Gulf War. From the careful linking of Saddam Hussein with Al Qaeda, to the WMD canard, to the September 2003 damage-control sideshow, AlterNet.org’s Christopher Scheer and Lakshmi Chaudhry team up with renowned journalist Robert Scheer to take the full measure of official deception.
They not only lied, the authors conclude; the pattern of obfuscation, misstatement, and half-retraction amounted to a devious entrapment of the American people. The Five Biggest Lies Bush Told Us About Iraq offers the first analysis of this pattern, underscoring that the lying was highly managed. The public did not commit troops, and dollars, to the invasion acting on the best information its government could provide. Instead, we fell victim to a marketing campaign conducted by a small group of influential radicals inside the Bush administration, who were pursuing their own narrow, hubristic agenda.
With U.S. soldiers still losing their lives, Bush’s ongoing doublespeak is outrageous. In the authors’ words, “The Bush administration continues to stand firm on the bodies of its own soldiers, who are paying a high price for its lack of reason. . . . The soldiers themselves are simply exhausted, homesick, and disillusioned with both their generals who sold them the shining lie of a quick war of liberation and the nation that seems unwilling to be rescued.”

From Publishers Weekly

Setting out to prove that “every major assertion that our government put forward to justify the conquest of Iraq has proved false,” this broadside (more akin to a long article than a short book) reviews the evidence (or lack thereof) for linking Iraq to al-Qaida and 9/11, and reveals what the authors say is the inflation of Iraq’s weapons capabilities and the erroneous assumptions about how long the war would take. Even sympathetic liberals may find the description of “the losing end of a long war of attrition” to be overstating the case. The concise account by veteran journalist Robert Scheer, his son and Chaudhry, editors of AlterNet.org, deftly incorporates dozens of other media sources, including very recent materials like Gerald Posner’s Why America Slept.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

“Setting out to prove that ‘every major assertion that our government put forward to justify the conquest of Iraq has proved false,’ this broadside (more akin to a long article than a short book) reviews the evidence (or lack thereof) for linking Iraq to al-Qaida and 9/11, and reveals what the authors say is the inflation of Iraq’s weapons capabilities and the erroneous assumptions about how long the war would take. Even sympathetic liberals may find the description of ‘the losing end of a long war of attrition’ to be overstating the case. The concise account by veteran journalist Robert Scheer, his son and Chaundhry, editors of AlterNet.org, deftly incorporates dozens of other media sources, including very recent materials like Gerald Posner’s Why America Slept.” –Publishers Weekly

“Highly readable and tightly argued, The Five Biggest Lies does more than devastatingly refute the mendacity of the Bush Administration’s Iraq policy. Christopher Scheer and his cohorts present a chilling portrait of the cabal of neo-cons who have commandeered American foreign policy, revealing the arrogance, assumptions, and contradictions that have had such disastrous consequences for our nation—and the world.” –Arianna Huffington

“Christopher Scheer and Robert Scheer have documented the depth of deception of all the president’s henchmen who misled America into war against Iraq. This book will become the required text for the coming wave of campus teach-ins and mass protests over US policy in Iraq. The Scheers have written the truth and the truth sets us free to reclaim our nation.” –Former United States Congressman Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio)

About the Author

CHRISTOPHER

SCHEER is managing editor of AlterNet.org, the popular news and commentary website. Scheer has written screenplays for Oliver Stone and previously worked for the San Francisco Examiner.
ROBERT SCHEER is the author of six books, the host of NPR affiliate KCRW’s “Left, Right, and Center,” and a contributing editor to both the Los Angeles Times and The Nation.
LAKSHMI CHAUDHRY is a senior editor at AlterNet.org.

  • Publisher‏ : ‎ Seven Stories Press; 1st edition (November 4, 2003)
  • Language‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback‏ : ‎ 178 pages
  • ISBN-10‏ : ‎ 1583226443
  • ISBN-13‏ : ‎ 978-1583226445
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 7.3 ounces
  • Dimensions‏ : ‎ 5.55 x 0.4 x 8.3 inches

Senate passes 9/11 bill pushed by Jon Stewart

ABC News – Jul 24, 2019

The legislation advocated for by the comedian will permanently fund health care for Sept. 11 first responders. READ MORE: https://abcn.ws/2y1suRx

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