Secret Agenda: Watergate, Deep Throat, and the CIA / Silent Coup: Watergate 25th Anniversary (1997)


Jul 5, 2022

Read Secret Agenda: https://amzn.to/3R9WJwN Read Silent Coup: https://amzn.to/3NEgxpe

Shortly after Watergate, Dean became an investment banker, author, and lecturer, based in Beverly Hills, California. He chronicled his White House experiences, with a focus on Watergate, in the memoirs Blind Ambition (1976) and Lost Honor (1982). Blind Ambition was ghostwritten by future Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Taylor Branch[20] and later made into a 1979 TV miniseries.

In 1992, Dean hired attorney Neil Papiano and brought the first in a series of defamation suits against Liddy for claims in Liddy’s book Will, and St. Martin’s Press for its publication of the book Silent Coup by Len Colodny and Robert Gettlin. Silent Coup alleged that Dean masterminded the Watergate burglaries and the Watergate coverup, and that the true aim of the burglaries was to seize information implicating Dean and the former Maureen “Mo” Biner (his then-fiancée) in a prostitution ring. After hearing of Colodny’s work, Liddy issued a revised paperback version of Will supporting Colodny’s theory.[21] This theory was subsequently the subject of the 1992 A&E Network Investigative Reports series program The Key to Watergate.[22][23]

In the preface to his 2006 book Conservatives Without Conscience, Dean strongly denied Colodny’s theory, pointing out that Colodny’s chief source (Phillip Mackin Bailley) had been in and out of mental institutions. Dean settled the defamation suit against Colodny and his publisher, St. Martin’s Press, on terms that Dean wrote in the book’s preface he could not divulge under the conditions of the settlement, other than that “the Deans were satisfied.” The case of Dean vs. Liddy was dismissed without prejudice.[24] Also in 2006, Dean appeared as an interviewee in the documentary The U.S. vs. John Lennon, about the Nixon administration’s efforts to keep John Lennon out of the United States.

Dean retired from investment banking in 2000 while continuing to work as an author and lecturer, becoming a columnist for FindLaw’s Writ online magazine. He resides in Beverly Hills, California.

In 2001, Dean published The Rehnquist Choice: The Untold Story of the Nixon Appointment that Redefined the Supreme Court, an exposé of the White House’s selection process for a new Supreme Court justice in 1971, which led to the appointment of William Rehnquist.[25] Three years later, Dean wrote a book heavily critical of the administration of George W. Bush, Worse than Watergate, in which he called for the impeachment of Bush and Vice President Dick Cheney for allegedly lying to Congress.[26]

His next book, released in 2006, was Conservatives without Conscience, a play on Barry Goldwater’s book The Conscience of a Conservative. In it, he asserts that post-Goldwater conservatism has been co-opted by people with authoritarian personalities and policies, citing data from Bob Altemeyer. According to Dean, modern conservatism, specifically on the Christian Right, embraces obedience, inequality, intolerance, and strong intrusive government, in stark contrast to Goldwater’s philosophies and policies. Using Altemeyer’s scholarly work, he contends that there is a tendency toward ethically questionable political practices when authoritarians are in power, and that the current political situation is dangerously unsound because of it. Dean cites the behavior of key members of the Republican leadership, including George W. Bush, Dick Cheney, Tom DeLay, Newt Gingrich, and Bill Frist, as clear evidence of a relationship between modern right-wing conservatism and this authoritarian approach to governance. He places particular emphasis on the abdication of checks and balances by the Republican Congress, and on the dishonesty of the conservative intellectual class in support of the Republican Party, as a result of the obedience and arrogance innate to the authoritarian mentality.[27]

After it became known that Bush authorized NSA wiretaps without warrants, Dean asserted that Bush is “the first President to admit to an impeachable offense”. On March 31, 2006, Dean testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee during hearings on censuring Bush over the issue. Senator Russell Feingold, who sponsored the censure resolution, introduced Dean as a “patriot” who put “rule of law above the interests of the president.” In his testimony, Dean asserted that Nixon covered up Watergate because he believed it was in the interest of national security. This sparked a sharp debate with Republican South Carolina senator Lindsey Graham, who repeatedly asserted that Nixon authorized the break-in at Democratic headquarters. Dean finally replied, “You’re showing you don’t know that subject very well.” Spectators laughed, and soon the senator was “sputtering mad”.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dean

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