Christopher Hitchens on the History of the 20th Century: U.K. and America (1995)

The Film Archives– Jul 14, 2014

Hitchens’ father, Eric Hitchens, was a Commander in the British Royal Navy. Hitchens often referred to his father as simply the ‘Commander’.

Listen to a Christopher Hitchens audiobook for free: https://www.amazon.com/gp/search?ie=U…
God Is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything – https://amzn.to/3E7sTT9
Arguably: Essays by Christopher Hitchens – https://amzn.to/3nqahYC Hitch-22:
A Memoir – https://amzn.to/3hmxI1d Letters to a Young Contrarian – https://amzn.to/3hlSJco
The Portable Atheist: Essential Readings for the Nonbeliever – https://amzn.to/3hlmSbY
Thomas Paine’s Rights of Man: A Biography: Books That Changed the World Mortality – https://amzn.to/3C3wvE6 No
One Left to Lie To: The Triangulations of William Jefferson Clinton – https://amzn.to/3luCBGX
Eminent Lives: The Presidents Collection – https://amzn.to/3nhkhn4
The Missionary Position: Mother Teresa in Theory and Practice – https://amzn.to/3A4bacL
The Trial of Henry Kissinger – https://amzn.to/38V1Gof
The Four Horsemen: The Conversation That Sparked an Atheist Revolution – https://amzn.to/2X6WE5I
Christopher Hitchens in Conversation with Salman Rushdie – https://amzn.to/3C3xqV4

On 26 December 1943, Hitchens’s father was deployed onboard HMS Jamaica when it sank the German warship, the Scharnhorst. Christopher Hitchens would refer to his father’s contribution to the war: ‘Sending a Nazi convoy raider to the bottom is a better day’s work than any I have ever done.’ He also stated that ‘the remark that most summed him [his father] up was the flat statement that the war of 1939 to 1945 had been “the only time when I really felt I knew what I was doing.”‘

Hitchens’ mother, Yvonne, died in Athens in 1973 when, despite first reports in The Times that she had been murdered, it was later concluded that her death had been the result of an apparent suicide pact with her boyfriend, Reverend Timothy Bryan. Hitchens travelled to Athens to identify his mother’s body. On the subject Hitchens later said: ‘She probably thought things were getting sordid — he [Bryan] wasn’t able to hold a job down, she couldn’t go back, she was probably about the age I am now and perhaps there was that — she’d been very pretty — and things were never going to get any better, so why go through with it? She might not have been that hard to persuade, but I know that she did try to save herself because I have the photographs still. So that was sort of the end of family life really.’

In reference to writing about his mother in his memoir, Hitch-22, he said, ‘It was painful to write about my mother, but not very because long ago I internally managed all that. ‘I even went back to Greece and I went to the graveyard while I was writing the book and decided not to write about it. I thought that would be sentimental.’

Hitchens’ younger brother by two-and-a-half years, Peter Hitchens, is a Christian and socially conservative journalist in London, although, like his brother, he had been a Trotskyist in the 1970s. The brothers had a protracted falling-out after Peter wrote that Christopher had once joked that he “didn’t care if the Red Army watered its horses at Hendon” (a suburb of London). Christopher denied having said this and broke off contact with his brother. He then referred to his brother as “an idiot” in a letter to Commentary, and the dispute spilled into other publications as well. Christopher eventually expressed a willingness to reconcile and to meet his new nephew (born in 1999); shortly thereafter the brothers gave several interviews together in which they said that their personal disagreements had been resolved. They appeared together on 21 June 2007 edition of the BBC current affairs discussion show Question Time. The pair engaged in a formal televised debate for the first time on 3 April 2008, at Grand Valley State University, and at the Pew Forum on 12 October 2010.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_hi…

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