Daily Archives: November 11, 2021

“We Are Not Responsible”: Youth Climate Activists Rally in Glasgow to Demand World Leaders A ct Now


Democracy Now!Nov 8, 2021
More than 100,000 people took to the streets of Glasgow this weekend in a pair of climate rallies outside the U.N. climate summit. The first protest was organized by Fridays for Future, an international movement of students which grew out of Greta Thunberg’s climate strike outside the Swedish parliament in 2018. We hear from climate activists Evelyn Acham, Mikaela Loach, Raki Ap, Helena Gualinga and Jon Bonifacio. In her address, Loach slammed the leaders of rich nations at COP26: “[They] steal our sacred words and use them to defend and uphold the oppressive systems of capitalism and white supremacy.” Gualina also spoke about the increasing violence against environmental defenders: “Behind every murder that happens in the Amazon, every killing that happens to a land defender, there is a company behind that, there is a government behind that, there is a name behind that.”

War Helps Fuel the Climate Crisis as U.S. Military Carbon Emissions Exceed 140+ Nations


Democracy Now!Nov 9, 2021
Climate activists protested outside the U.N. climate summit in Glasgow Monday spotlighting the role of the U.S. military in fueling the climate crisis. The Costs of War project estimates the military produced around 1.2 billion metric tons of carbon emissions between 2001 and 2017, with nearly a third coming from U.S. wars overseas. But military carbon emissions have largely been exempted from international climate treaties dating back to the 1997 Kyoto Protocol after lobbying from the United States. We go to Glasgow to speak with Ramón Mejía, anti-militarism national organizer of Grassroots Global Justice Alliance and Iraq War veteran; Erik Edstrom, Afghanistan War veteran turned climate activist; and Neta Crawford, director of the Costs of War project. “The United States military has been a mechanism of environmental destruction,” says Crawford.

U.S., China unveil surprise deal on climate change – YouTube


ReutersNov 10, 2021
The United States and China, the world’s two largest emitters of carbon dioxide, unveiled a deal to ramp up cooperation tackling climate change, including by reducing methane emissions, protecting forests and phasing out coal.

This Will Set Africa on Fire: Nnimmo Bassey of Nigeria Blasts Progress of U.N. Climate Summit Talks


Democracy Now!Nov 10, 2021
Today a draft agreement at COP26 was released, calling on nations to accelerate the phasing out of coal and fossil fuel subsidies and make pledges to cut emissions by the end of 2022. The draft also urges wealthy nations to “urgently scale-up” financial support for developing countries to help them adapt to the climate crisis. This comes as a new report by the group Climate Action Tracker estimates world temperatures are on track to rise by 2.4 degrees Celsius above preindustrial levels based on current pledges to cut emissions — far higher than the 1.5 degree goal set in the 2015 Paris Agreement. To discuss the latest developments at COP26, we speak with Nigerian environmental activist and poet Nnimmo Bassey. “There’s no force behind what’s being proposed,” says Bassey, who adds that the current trajectory of negotiations will have devastating effects on Africa. “That means setting the continent on fire. It is just sacrificing the continent.” Bassey also discusses the role of China in Africa and the impact of the climate crisis on the continent. He has attended climate summits for years but says this may be his last one.

The Global Climate Wall: Wealthy Nations Prioritize Militarizing Borders Over Climate Action


Democracy Now!Nov 10, 2021
The world’s richest countries have responded by militarizing their borders and treating the humanitarian crisis as a security issue. NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg attended this year’s U.N. climate summit, marking the first time a top alliance leader came to the climate talks since they began. On Tuesday, U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at COP26 raised the issue of security during a press conference. “The richest countries are building a climate wall against the consequences of climate change rather than dealing with the causes and rather than providing the money that would enable people to stay,” says Nick Buxton, with the Transnational Institute and co-author of their new report, “Global Climate Wall: How the world’s wealthiest nations prioritise borders over climate action.” We also speak with Santra Denis, executive director of the Miami Workers Center, about the focus of the It Takes Roots grassroots delegation at COP26. She says that in order to protect frontline communities and workers, the U.S. should focus on investing in low-carbon and adaptation industries instead of border control.

“A Process of Violence”: Indian Author Amitav Ghosh on How Colonialism Fueled the Climate Cr isis


Democracy Now!Nov 10, 2021
As talks at the Glasgow U.N. climate summit accelerate, we look at how the roots of the climate crisis date back to Western colonialism with award-winning Indian author Amitav Ghosh, who examines the violent exploitation of human life and the natural environment in his new book, “The Nutmeg’s Curse: Parables for a Planet in Crisis.” Ghosh speaks about the political significance of fossil fuels in global politics, saying that “if fossil fuels were to be completely substituted at scale, what you would have is the complete inversion of the world’s geopolitical order.” Ghosh’s previous books include “The Great Derangement: Climate Change and the Unthinkable” and the novel “Gun Island.”

Ghana Museums & Monuments Board

“These edifices testify to the once flourishing trade between the indigenous African people and the European trading companies of Portugal, the Netherlands, Denmark, England, France, Sweden, and Brandenburg of German Prussia. The history of Ghana’s government administration, judiciary, religion, health care and even its architecture has its roots at these ancient relics.”

(Ephson, Dr. Isaac S., Ancient Forts and Castles of the Gold Coast (Ghana), Ilen Publications, Accra 1970, page 13.)

…(read more).

Ghana Museums & Monuments Board

\

The Museums Division of GMMB oversees nine main museums, including the National Museum. Two of the museums are situated inside a castle, and three are situated inside a fort. Apart from their regular exhibits, the museums organise temporary exhibitions.

In addition, the Museums Division gives technical assistance to the WEB Du Bois Centre Museum and the Kwame Nkrumah Memorial Park Museum in Accra. This assistance is also extended to private museums in the country such as the Police Museum in Accra, The Military Museum in Kumasi, Prempeh ll Jubilee Museum in Kumasi, the Manhyia Palace Museum in Kumasi.

…(read more).

See Forts and Castles