Daily Archives: October 25, 2021

Can Sea Water Desalination Save The World?


CNBCOct 16, 2019
Today, one out of three people don’t have access to safe drinking water. And that’s the result of many things, but one of them is that 96.5% of that water is found in our oceans. It’s saturated with salt, and undrinkable. Most of the freshwater is locked away in glaciers or deep underground. Less than one percent of it is available to us. So why can’t we just take all that seawater, filter out the salt, and have a nearly unlimited supply of clean, drinkable water?

Why the Western Drought Will Have Major Ripple Effects | WSJ


Wall Street JournalJul 13, 2021
Watering the Country’s Food Basket Is Becoming a Challenge

Droughts are part of a natural cycle of water. But the drought currently gripping the Western U.S. has climate scientists concerned that the cycle may be shifting. This has major implications for those who rely on the water the most: farmers and the communities they surround. Photo Illustration: Carter McCall/WSJ

La Palma Volcano: Drone flight gives a clear view on New Vent from south side of volcano

JustAs it is– Oct 23, 2021

Lava from the volcano has covered neary 800 hectares (2,000) acres of land, destroying 2,000 buildings and many banana plantations since the eruption started on September 19. More than 6,000 people have had to leave their homes.

See related:

La Palma Volcano Eruption Update; Volcanic Smoke Reaches Barbados, Large Earthquake

GeologyHub– Oct 25, 2021

The La Palma / Cumbre Vieja eruption is now in its 37th day. Because of the scale of the ongoing eruption, its effects are being felt over a vast area, even as far away as Barbados. So far, more than 9 square kilometers have been covered with lava, and 40 hectares of new land have been added to the island. On October 23rd, the largest earthquake during the overall eruption occurred, rating as a 4.9 on the richter scale. It represented the largest earthquake to ever occur on the island. This video will discuss what is likely to happen next as this Spanish Canary Island volcano.

See related:

Rethinking the Civic Imagination & Manufactured Ignorance in the Post Pandemic World – Noam Chomsky

McMaster Humanities– Oct 13, 2021

The Wilson Institute for Canadian History and the Center for Scholarship in the Public Interest is pleased to present Noam Chomsky “Rethinking the Civic Imagination and Manufactured Ignorance in the Post Pandemic World.” Monday, 4 October, at 7 p.m. This is a joint project sponsored by Dr. Henry A. Giroux, McMaster University and Professor for Scholarship in the Public Interest and Dr. Ian McKay, L.R. Wilson Chair in Canadian History, Professor of History.

Facebook is making hate worse, whistleblower says – BBC Newsnight

BBC News – Oct 25, 2021

Whistleblower Frances Haugen has told UK MPs Facebook is “unquestionably making hate worse”, as they consider what new rules to impose on big social networks.

Whistleblower Frances Haugen has told UK members of parliament Facebook is “unquestionably making hate worse”, as they consider what new rules to impose on big social networks.

Ms Haugen was talking to the Online Safety Bill committee in London.

She said Facebook safety teams were under-resourced, and “Facebook has been unwilling to accept even little slivers of profit being sacrificed for safety”.

And she warned that Instagram was “more dangerous than other forms of social media”.

If Facebook can’t root out dangerous anti-social media on its own platforms, can anyone?

Newsnight’s Sima Kotecha reports. Faisal Islam is joined by former Facebook director of policy for Europe Lord Allan, former Facebook whistleblower Sophie Zhang and former culture minister Lord Vaizey.

 

A look at events in Sudan since the fall of Omar al-Bashir • FRANCE 24 English

FRANCE 24 English – Oct 25, 2021
#Sudan’s #military seized power Monday, dissolving the transitional government hours after troops arrested the acting prime minister and other officials. Thousands of people flooded into the streets to #protest the coup that threatens the country’s progress toward #democracy. FRANCE 24’s International Affairs Editor Angela Diffley takes a look at events in Sudan since the overthrow of autocratic President Omar al-Bashir over two years ago.

Live: Facebook Whistleblower Testifies at Senate Hearing | NBC News


NBC News – Streamed live on Oct 5, 2021

Watch live coverage as Facebook whistleblower Frances Haugen testifies at a Senate Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee hearing on protecting kids online.

Facebook ‘unquestionably’ exacerbating hate, whistleblower tells MPs


Guardian News – Oct 25, 2021

Much of the blame for the world’s increasingly polarised politics lies with social networks and the radicalising effects of their services, the whistleblower Frances Haugen told MPs as she called for external regulation to reduce social harm. The company’s internal culture prioritised profitability over its impact on the wider world, said Haugen, a former product manager on Facebook’s civic misinformation team.

Roads: An Anthropology of Infrastructure and Expertise (Expertise: Cultures and Technologies of Knowledge): Penny Harvey, Hannah Knox

Roads matter to people. This claim is central to the work of Penny Harvey and Hannah Knox, who in this book use the example of highway building in South America to explore what large public infrastructural projects can tell us about contemporary state formation, social relations, and emerging political economies.

Roads focuses on two main sites: the interoceanic highway currently under construction between Brazil and Peru, a major public/private collaboration that is being realized within new, internationally ratified regulatory standards; and a recently completed one-hundred-kilometer stretch of highway between Iquitos, the largest city in the Peruvian Amazon, and a small town called Nauta, one of the earliest colonial settlements in the Amazon. The Iquitos-Nauta highway is one of the most expensive roads per kilometer on the planet.

Combining ethnographic and historical research, Harvey and Knox shed light on the work of engineers and scientists, bureaucrats and construction company officials. They describe how local populations anticipated each of the road projects, even getting deeply involved in questions of exact routing as worries arose that the road would benefit some more than others. Connectivity was a key recurring theme as people imagined the prosperity that will come by being connected to other parts of the country and with other parts of the world. Sweeping in scope and conceptually ambitious, Roads tells a story of global flows of money, goods, and people―and of attempts to stabilize inherently unstable physical and social environments.

Review

“What is the relation between the unity and stability of the nation-state and the state of a nation’s infrastructure? In addressing this question, Roads forces us to consider, among much else, the expertise of infrastructure’s architects, the construction engineers, whose work is attuned to the instability, unruliness and unevenness of the environments within which infrastructure is assembled. The infrastructure of the road turns out not to be the stable base on which the state can ground its existence, but a situated achievement. Penny Harvey and Hannah Knox’s remarkable ethnography of infrastructure is a vital intervention, in anthropology and beyond.”

(Andrew Barry, University College London, author of Material Politics: Disputes Along the Pipeline)

Review

“What is the relation between the unity and stability of the nation-state and the state of a nation’s infrastructure? In addressing this question, Roads forces us to consider, among much else, the expertise of infrastructure’s architects, the construction engineers, whose work is attuned to the instability, unruliness and unevenness of the environments within which infrastructure is assembled. The infrastructure of the road turns out not to be the stable base on which the state can ground its existence, but a situated achievement. Penny Harvey and Hannah Knox’s remarkable ethnography of infrastructure is a vital intervention, in anthropology and beyond.”