Daily Archives: October 12, 2021

Possible Tsunami (Oct 13) La Palma volcano lava effusion rates, new lava arm at the sea

U.S. Military Action – Oct 11, 2021

Today, the eruption continues with steady lava fountaining from the lower vent and strong degassing and ash emission from the upper vents, but is much less noisy compared to yesterday, to the relief of people living in the area many of whom were terrorized by the extreme noise of the eruption in recent days. The decrease of sound intensity is however not an indication of what state the eruption is in its deeper underground. It is mostly reflecting how gasses can escape and interact with the ambient air at the very surface. The decrease of eruption sound is likely due to an enlargement of the upper conduits after several collapses and other changes occurred at the vents, which now are in a more stable configuration to allow the passage of magma in a more unobstructed way. It probably has no significance as to the eruption’s effusion rate, which continued to be very high. The past day’s activity changed the morphology of the main cone quite a bit, by accumulation of falling material from the mountains, as well as overlapping lava flows.

La Palma Volcano Eruption Update; Acidic Danger, New Lava Flows

GeologyHub– Oct 11, 2021

The ongoing La Palma / Cumbre Vieja eruption is now in its 24th day. This is quite significant, as it is now longer in duration than the prior eruption in 1971. In the past several days, three new hazards have been created from the ongoing eruption. Additional lava flows formed to the sides of the volcano, acidic acid is being constantly emitted, and occasional volcanic lightning is occurring above the main volcanic cone. This video will discuss what is likely to happen next as this Spanish Canary Island volcano.

This is what the volcano on La Palma looked like before the eruption – La Palma – Canary Islands

Doreen Urbańska– Sep 27, 2021

Cumbre Vieja is very dangerous. The eruption of this volcano can cause megatsunami with waves up to 300 m. Since 2017, scientists have warned that Cumbre Vieja could explode at any time. The eruption began on September 19, 2021 and is currently ongoing. You have to see: Shock: Will the volcano destroy La Palma’s banana crops? – La Palma – Canary Islands – https://youtu.be/G3n1F8ETb60
More films about La Palma on my channel:
https://youtu.be/yIBAybh7Zhw
https://youtu.be/y_mpUv5unuE
https://youtu.be/3m_ggtiOVms
https://youtu.be/QfAGqBefW-Q
https://youtu.be/lMD6V6vZMYs

Crater COLLAPSES on ‘Aggressive’ Volcano


On Demand News – Oct 4, 2021

The volcanic eruption on the Spanish island of La Palma has intensified, two weeks after it first erupted.

Lava continued to flow from the Cumbre Vieja volcano, after part of the crater collapsed unleashing a cascade of faster-moving lava.

The more fluid lava followed the same course as previous molten rock which has now hardened, filling up gaps and spilling over the sides into surrounding countryside.

The volcano has so far emitted already more than double of melted rocks than the amount in the island’s last eruption, in 1971.

Megatsunami Scenario – La Palma Landslide


Naked Science -Jun 21, 2017

A slide from this mountain could kill millions of people in Europe and along Northern America’s eastern seaboard. Some eminent scientists warn that it’s purely a matter of time until it happens. This is the volcanic island of La Palma, 700 miles off the northwest coast of Africa. It’s a new-born baby island barely past its 4 millionth Birthday, created in the last stage of what geologists call the rock cycle.

Clip taken from the Naked Science documentary “Landslides”. Watch it here – http://youtu.be/ugxt_dq0FOg

The Future Tsunami That Could Destroy the US East Coast

RealLifeLore – Jun 1, 2018

The first 1,000 people to sign up for Skillshare will get their first 2 months for free; http://skl.sh/reallifelore13

Climate change: Where we are in seven charts and what you can do to help – BBC News

Climate change is set to cause major changes across the world: sea levels will rise, food production could fall and species may be driven to extinction.

The UN has warned that the world needs to limit climate change to below 1.5C above pre-industrial levels. But scientists say that keeping to the 1.5C target will require “rapid, far-reaching and unprecedented changes” in all aspects of society.

So how warm has the world got and what can we do about it?

…(read more).

Billions to Boeing as Congress debates cutting social programs


RT AmericaOct 12, 2021
Boeing has secured a contract to build new helicopters for the US Army despite its damaged reputation and the deadly laxness about safety measures that made the Boeing 737 MAX so infamous. It is just one of several multi-billion dollar contracts awarded to the manufacturing giant. Boeing and other defense contractors continue to receive billions while Congress debates cuts to needed social programs. RT America’s Faran Fronczak reports.

America’s Fate: Oligarchy or Autocracy

RT America – Oct 4, 2021

On the show Chris Hedges discusses with the economist Richard Wolff how capitalism works under an autocracy or an oligarchy, the only two political systems left in the United States of America.

The competing systems of power in the United States are divided between oligarchy and autocracy. There are no other alternatives. Neither are pleasant. Each have peculiar and distasteful characteristics. Each pays lip service to the fictions of democracy and constitutional rights. And each exacerbates the widening social and political divide and the potential for violent conflict. The oligarchs from the establishment Republican party, figures such as Liz Cheney, Mitt Romney, George and Jeb Bush and Bill Kristol, have joined forces with the oligarchs in the Democratic Party to defy the autocrats in the new Republican party who have coalesced in cult-like fashion around Donald Trump or, if he does not run again for president, his inevitable Frankensteinian doppelgänger. The alliance of Republican and Democratic oligarchs exposes the burlesque that characterized the old two-party system, where the ruling parties fought over what Sigmund Freud called the “narcissism of minor differences” but were united on all the major structural issues including massive defense spending, free trade deals, tax cuts for the wealthy and corporations, the endless wars, government surveillance, the money-saturated election process, neoliberalism, austerity, deindustrialization, militarized police and the world’s largest prison system. The liberal class, fearing autocracy, has thrown in its lot with the oligarchs, discrediting and rendering impotent the causes and issues it claims to champion. The bankruptcy of the liberal class is important, for it effectively turns liberal democratic values into the empty platitudes those who embrace autocracy condemn and despise.

The economist Richard Wolff is a Visiting Professor in the Graduate Program in International Affairs of the New School in New York City. He previous taught economics at Yale University, where he received his PhD in economics, the City University of New York, the University of Massachusetts Amherst and the Sorbonne.

Country houses and the British Empire, 1700–1930 (Studies in Imperialism, 116): St ephanie, Barczewski, Andrew Thompson, John M. MacKenzie

Country houses and the British empire, 1700-1930 assesses the economic and cultural links between country houses and the Empire between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries. Using sources from over fifty British and Irish archives, it enables readers to better understand the impact of the empire upon the British metropolis by showing both the geographical variations and its different cultural manifestations. Barczewski offers a rare scholarly analysis of the history of country houses that goes beyond an architectural or biographical study, and recognises their importance as the physical embodiments of imperial wealth and reflectors of imperial cultural influences. In so doing, she restores them to their true place of centrality in British culture over the last three centuries, and provides fresh insights into the role of the Empire in the British metropolis.

Review

‘[Country Houses and the British Empire] is well written and researched, as well as properly documented. It is also laudable in its coverage of the entire British Isles, not just England.’ G. A. Bremner, Transactions of the Ancient Monuments Society

From the Inside Flap

Country houses and the British Empire, 1700–1930, assesses the economic and cultural links between country houses and the Empire between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries. Using sources from over fifty British and Irish archives, it enables readers to better understand the impact of the Empire upon the British metropolis by showing both the geographical variations and the different cultural manifestations of that impact. The first half of the book concentrates on economic issues, as it lists the more than a thousand houses that were purchased using imperial wealth and analyses the attitudes that underlay those purchases. It also maps the concentrations of country houses purchased from imperial funds, showing how some parts of the United Kingdom saw a significantly greater inflow of wealth from the colonies than did others. The second half turns to the cultural display of empire in country-house context, which was focused around four discourses: a discourse of commodities, a discourse of cosmopolitanism, a discourse of conquest and a discourse of collecting. Suitable for both a scholarly audience, postgraduate and advanced undergraduate students and more general readers, Country houses and the British Empire offers a rare scholarly analysis of the history of country houses that goes beyond their architecture or biographical studies of their owners. It recognises their importance as the physical embodiments of imperial wealth and as reflectors of imperial cultural influences. In so doing, it restores them to their true place of centrality in British culture over the last three centuries, and provides fresh insights into the role of the Empire in the British metropolis.

From the Back Cover

Country houses and the British Empire, 1700–1930, assesses the economic and cultural links between country houses and the Empire between the eighteenth and twentieth centuries. Using sources from over fifty British and Irish archives, it enables readers to better understand the impact of the Empire upon the British metropolis by showing both the geographical variations and the different cultural manifestations of that impact. The first half of the book concentrates on economic issues, as it lists the more than a thousand houses that were purchased using imperial wealth and analyses the attitudes that underlay those purchases. It also maps the concentrations of country houses purchased from imperial funds, showing how some parts of the United Kingdom saw a significantly greater inflow of wealth from the colonies than did others. The second half turns to the cultural display of empire in country-house context, which was focused around four discourses: a discourse of commodities, a discourse of cosmopolitanism, a discourse of conquest and a discourse of collecting. Suitable for both a scholarly audience, postgraduate and advanced undergraduate students and more general readers, Country houses and the British Empire offers a rare scholarly analysis of the history of country houses that goes beyond their architecture or biographical studies of their owners. It recognises their importance as the physical embodiments of imperial wealth and as reflectors of imperial cultural influences. In so doing, it restores them to their true place of centrality in British culture over the last three centuries, and provides fresh insights into the role of the Empire in the British metropolis.

About the Author

Stephanie Barczewski is Professor of Modern British History at Clemson University

John MacKenzie is Emeritus Professor of Imperial History, Lancaster University and holds Honorary Professorships at Aberdeen, St Andrews and Stirling, as well as an Honorary Fellowship at Edinburgh.

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Manchester University Press; 1st edition (October 24, 2016)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 352 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 1526106647
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-1526106643
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 1.2 pounds
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 9.1 x 1.1 x 6.1 inches