Daily Archives: September 13, 2021

Starving for a deal: Food prices Skyrocket


RT AmericaSep 13, 2021
If you’ve gone to a restaurant lately, you’ve probably noticed higher menu prices. That’s because inflation is now hitting the restaurant industry, leading many to raise prices in order to survive. That is on top of unprecedented labor and food shortages. RT America’s Sayeh Tavangar has the latest.

Captured at Sea (Atelier: Ethnographic Inquiry in the Twenty-First Century) (Volume 3): Jatin Dua

How is it possible for six men to take a Liberian-flagged oil tanker hostage and negotiate a huge pay out for the return of its crew and 2.2 million barrels of crude oil? In his gripping new book, Jatin Dua answers this question by exploring the unprecedented upsurge in maritime piracy off the coast of Somalia in the twenty-first century. Taking the reader inside pirate communities in Somalia, onboard multinational container ships, and within insurance offices in London, Dua connects modern day pirates to longer histories of trade and disputes over protection. In our increasingly technological world, maritime piracy represents not only an interruption, but an attempt to insert oneself within the world of oceanic trade. Captured at Sea moves beyond the binaries of legal and illegal to illustrate how the seas continue to be key sites of global regulation, connectivity, and commerce today.

This is an engaging and vivid narrative, based on extraordinary fieldwork and insightful observations. It is filled with compelling anecdotes, events, and characters, and it tells a story that is both intrinsically interesting and filled with intriguing insights about power, violence, and sovereignty.”&;&;James Ferguson, author of Give a Man a Fish: Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution

“This brilliant and absorbing book is like no other. It is first and foremost an astonishing ethnography of the politics of piracy and ransom in Somalia. But Dua also critically expands our imagined maps of piracy to show how deeply European insurance and shipping businesses and even NATO warships are implicated in the political economy of protection in the Western Indian Ocean.” &;&;Laleh Khalili, Professor of Politics at SOAS University of London

“In this remarkable ethnography, we see Somali piracy as an economy of capture and redistribution intimately tied to a long history of Indian Ocean trade. Rather than an outmoded aberration, Dua argues for piracy as one among many infrastructures of protection that knit together a transregional geography of power, property, and profit. A truly impressive achievement.”&;&;Ajantha Subramanian, author of Shorelines: Space and Rights in South India 

From the Back Cover

“This is an engaging and vivid narrative, based on extraordinary fieldwork and insightful observations. It is filled with compelling anecdotes, events, and characters, and it tells a story that is both intrinsically interesting and filled with intriguing insights about power, violence, and sovereignty.”––James Ferguson, author of Give a Man a Fish: Reflections on the New Politics of Distribution

“This brilliant and absorbing book is like no other. It is first and foremost an astonishing ethnography of the politics of piracy and ransom in Somalia. But Dua also critically expands our imagined maps of piracy to show how deeply European insurance and shipping businesses and even NATO warships are implicated in the political economy of protection in the Western Indian Ocean.” ––Laleh Khalili, Professor of Politics at SOAS University of London

“In this remarkable ethnography, we see Somali piracy as an economy of capture and redistribution intimately tied to a long history of Indian Ocean trade. Rather than an outmoded aberration, Dua argues for piracy as one among many infrastructures of protection that knit together a transregional geography of power, property, and profit. A truly impressive achievement.”––Ajantha Subramanian, author of Shorelines: Space and Rights in South India

About the Author

Jatin Dua is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of Michigan.

Product details

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ University of California Press; First edition (December 10, 2019)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 259 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0520305205
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0520305205
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 12.8 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 6 x 0.65 x 9 inches

How to Lie with Statistics by Darrell Geis Huff

Darrell Huff runs the gamut of every popularly used type of statistic, probes such things as the sample study, the tabulation method, the interview technique, or the way the results are derived from the figures, and points up the countless number of dodges which are used to full rather than to inform.

“There is terror in numbers,” writes Darrell Huff in How to Lie with Statistics. And nowhere does this terror translate to blind acceptance of authority more than in the slippery world of averages, correlations, graphs, and trends. Huff sought to break through “the daze that follows the collision of statistics with the human mind” with this slim volume, first published in 1954. The book remains relevant as a wake-up call for people unaccustomed to examining the endless flow of numbers pouring from Wall Street, Madison Avenue, and everywhere else someone has an axe to grind, a point to prove, or a product to sell. “The secret language of statistics, so appealing in a fact-minded culture, is employed to sensationalize, inflate, confuse, and oversimplify,” warns Huff.

Although many of the examples used in the book are charmingly dated, the cautions are timeless. Statistics are rife with opportunities for misuse, from “gee-whiz graphs” that add nonexistent drama to trends, to “results” detached from their method and meaning, to statistics’ ultimate bugaboo–faulty cause-and-effect reasoning. Huff’s tone is tolerant and amused, but no-nonsense. Like a lecturing father, he expects you to learn something useful from the book, and start applying it every day. Never be a sucker again, he cries!

Even if you can’t find a source of demonstrable bias, allow yourself some degree of skepticism about the results as long as there is a possibility of bias somewhere. There always is.

Read How to Lie with Statistics. Whether you encounter statistics at work, at school, or in advertising, you’ll remember its simple lessons. Don’t be terrorized by numbers, Huff implores. “The fact is that, despite its mathematical base, statistics is as much an art as it is a science.” –Therese Littleton

Review

“A hilarious exploration of mathematical mendacity.… Every time you pick it up, what happens? Bang goes another illusion!”
New York Times

“A pleasantly subversive little book guaranteed to undermine your faith in the almighty statistic.”
Atlantic

About the Author

Darrell Huff lives in Carmel, California.

  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ W. W. Norton & Company; Reissue edition (October 17, 1993)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 144 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0393310728
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0393310726
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 3.84 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 5.5 x 0.5 x 8.3 inches

How to Lie with Maps (2nd Edition): Mark Monmonier, H. J. de Blij

Originally published to wide acclaim, this lively, cleverly illustrated essay on the use and abuse of maps teaches us how to evaluate maps critically and promotes a healthy skepticism about these easy-to-manipulate models of reality. Monmonier shows that, despite their immense value, maps lie. In fact, they must.

The second edition is updated with the addition of two new chapters, 10 color plates, and a new foreword by renowned geographer H. J. de Blij. One new chapter examines the role of national interest and cultural values in national mapping organizations, including the United States Geological Survey, while the other explores the new breed of multimedia, computer-based maps.

To show how maps distort, Monmonier introduces basic principles of mapmaking, gives entertaining examples of the misuse of maps in situations from zoning disputes to census reports, and covers all the typical kinds of distortions from deliberate oversimplifications to the misleading use of color.

“Professor Monmonier himself knows how to gain our attention; it is not in fact the lies in maps but their truth, if always approximate and incomplete, that he wants us to admire and use, even to draw for ourselves on the facile screen. His is an artful and funny book, which like any good map, packs plenty in little space.”—Scientific American

“A useful guide to a subject most people probably take too much for granted. It shows how map makers translate abstract data into eye-catching cartograms, as they are called. It combats cartographic illiteracy. It fights cartophobia. It may even teach you to find your way. For that alone, it seems worthwhile.”—Christopher Lehmann-Haupt, The New York Times

“. . . witty examination of how and why maps lie. [The book] conveys an important message about how statistics of any kind can be manipulated. But it also communicates much of the challenge, aesthetic appeal, and sheer fun of maps. Even those who hated geography in grammar school might well find a new enthusiasm for the subject after reading Monmonier’s lively and surprising book.”—Wilson Library Bulletin

“A reading of this book will leave you much better defended against cheap atlases, shoddy journalism, unscrupulous advertisers, predatory special-interest groups, and others who may use or abuse maps at your expense.”—John Van Pelt, Christian Science Monitor

“Monmonier meets his goal admirably. . . . [His] book should be put on every map user’s ‘must read’ list. It is informative and readable . . . a big step forward in helping us to understand how maps can mislead their readers.”—Jeffrey S. Murray, Canadian Geographic

From the Back Cover

Originally published to wide acclaim, this lively, cleverly illustrated essay on the use and abuse of maps teaches us how to evaluate maps critically and promotes a healthy skepticism about these easy-to-manipulate models of reality. As Monmonier show, maps not only point the way and provide information, maps lie. In fact, they must.

About the Author

Mark Monmonier is distinguished professor of geography at Syracuse University’s Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs.

  • ASIN ‏ : ‎ 0226534219
  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ University of Chicago Press; 2nd edition (May 1, 1996)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 207 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 9780226534213
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0226534213
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 9.6 ounces
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 5.5 x 0.9 x 8.5 inches