Daily Archives: June 1, 2021

“Exterminate All the Brutes”: Filmmaker Raoul Peck Explores Colonialism & Origins of White Supremacy


Democracy Now!

Published on May 31, 2021

A new four-part documentary series, “Exterminate All the Brutes,” delves deeply into the legacy of European colonialism from the Americas to Africa. It has been described as an unflinching narrative of genocide and exploitation, beginning with the colonizing of Indigenous land that is now called the United States. The documentary series seeks to counter “the type of lies, the type of propaganda, the type of abuse, that we have been subject to all of these years,” says director and Haitian-born filmmaker Raoul Peck. “We have the means to tell the real story, and that’s exactly what I decided to do,” Peck says. “Everything is on the table, has been on the table for a long time, except that it was in little bits everywhere. … We lost the wider perspective.”

Paradise on Earth. Some thoughts on European images of non-European man. by Henri Baudet

Publisher: New Haven/London (Yale University Press)

Publication Date: 1965

Binding: Hardcover

The Evolution of American Ecology, 1890–2000: Sharon E. Kingstand

In the 1890s, several initiatives in American botany converged. The creation of new institutions, such as the New York Botanical Garden, coincided with radical reforms in taxonomic practice and the emergence of an experimental program of research on evolutionary problems. Sharon Kingsland explores how these changes gave impetus to the new field of ecology that was defined at exactly this time. She argues that the creation of institutions and research laboratories, coupled with new intellectual directions in science, were crucial to the development of ecology as a discipline in the United States.

The main concern of ecology ”the relationship between organisms and environment”was central to scientific studies aimed at understanding and controlling the evolutionary process. Kingsland considers the evolutionary context in which ecology arose, especially neo-Lamarckian ideas and the new mutation theory, and explores the relationship between scientific research and broader theories about social progress and the evolution of human civilization.

By midcentury, American ecologists were leading the rapid development of ecosystem ecology. At the same time, scientists articulated a sharp critique of modern science and society in the postwar context, foreshadowing the environmental critiques of the 1960s. As the ecosystem concept evolved, so too did debates about how human ecology should be incorporated into the biological sciences. Kingsland concludes with an examination of ecology in the modern urban environment, reflecting on how scientists are now being challenged to overcome disciplinary constraints and produce innovative responses to pressing problems.

The Evolution of American Ecology, 1890–2000 offers an innovative study not only of the scientific landscape in turn-of-the-century America, but of current questions in ecological science.

Reviews

“A new approach to ecology… well worth consideration by ecologists, science historians, and anyone interested in how human ecology should be integrated with the biological sciences.”

(Nancy Stack Science)

“Kingsland does a masterful job weaving together the history of ecology in the United States.”

(William H. Schlesinger Bioscience)

“Kingsland has ambitiously followed the growth of American ecology from the end of the 19th throughout the 20th century, looking at social, economic, and scientific influences… Quite worthwhile for any ecologist interested in the history of their field.”

(Matthew L. Forister Quarterly Review of Biology)

“Kingsland breaks new ground by tightly linking the intellectual history of ecological science with changes in the land.”

(Gregg A. Mitman Journal of American History)

“Anyone interested in the history of American ecology and its relationship to our changing perspective on the environment will find this a worthwhile read and a clear exposition of those changes.”

(Larry Thomas Spencer Environmental History)

“In contrast to other historical accounts, Sharon Kingsland’s book emphasizes the ways that human ecology centered in urban settings has shaped the discipline.”

(Joel B. Hagen Isis)

“The details of how the field began and the accounts of the ecological pioneers make this book an enjoyable account of scientific history.”

(Timothy J. Motley Brittonia)

“This fine book provides an excellent opportunity to reflect back on the ecological sciences and their entanglement with environmental concerns in the USA… A refreshing and novel approach that breaks new grounds in our understanding of how ecology became a dominating scientific approach to the environment.”

(Peder Anker Centaurus)

“Deeply researched and well written, Kingsland’s study is likely to become a standard reference for scholars from many fields.”

(Andrew Kirk American Historical Review)

“An important, innovative scholarly contribution that nicely captures both the excitement and frustration of American botanists as they struggled to professionalize their discipline. Kingsland does a marvelous job of reconstructing the American botanical landscape during a crucial period in its development.”

(Mark V. Barrow, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University)

From the Inside Flap

In the 1890s, several initiatives in American botany converged. The creation of new institutions, such as the New York Botanical Garden, coincided with radical reforms in taxonomic practice and the emergence of an experimental program of research on evolutionary problems. The Evolution of American Ecology, 1890-2000 explores how these changes gave impetus to the new field of ecology. Sharon E. Kingsland argues that the creation of institutions and research laboratories, coupled with new intellectual directions in science, were crucial to the development of ecology as a discipline in the United States. Understanding the origins of ecology in turn helps us to understand its later development through the twentieth century.

A new approach to ecology . . . well worth consideration by ecologists, science historians, and anyone interested in how human ecology should be integrated with the biological sciences.–Science

Kingsland does a masterful job weaving together the history of ecology in the United States.–Bioscience

Kingsland has ambitiously followed the growth of American ecology from the end of the 19th throughout the 20th century, looking at social, economic, and scientific influences . . . Quite worthwhile for any ecologist interested in the history of their field.–Quarterly Review of Biology

Kingsland breaks new ground by tightly linking the intellectual history of ecological science with changes in the land.–Journal of American History

Anyone interested in the history of American ecology and its relationship to our changing perspective on the environment will find this a worthwhile read.–Environmental History

The details of how the field began and the accounts of the ecological pioneers make this book an enjoyable account of scientific history.–Brittonia

A refreshing and novel approach that breaks new grounds in our understanding of how ecology became a dominating scientific approach to the environment.–Centaurus

Sharon E. Kingsland is a professor of the history of science at the Johns Hopkins University.

–Mark V. Barrow, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University “American Historical Review”

From the Back Cover

In the 1890s, several initiatives in American botany converged. The creation of new institutions, such as the New York Botanical Garden, coincided with radical reforms in taxonomic practice and the emergence of an experimental program of research on evolutionary problems. The Evolution of American Ecology, 1890–2000 explores how these changes gave impetus to the new field of ecology. Sharon E. Kingsland argues that the creation of institutions and research laboratories, coupled with new intellectual directions in science, were crucial to the development of ecology as a discipline in the United States. Understanding the origins of ecology in turn helps us to understand its later development through the twentieth century.

“A new approach to ecology… well worth consideration by ecologists, science historians, and anyone interested in how human ecology should be integrated with the biological sciences.”―Science

“Kingsland does a masterful job weaving together the history of ecology in the United States.”―Bioscience

“Kingsland has ambitiously followed the growth of American ecology from the end of the 19th throughout the 20th century, looking at social, economic, and scientific influences… Quite worthwhile for any ecologist interested in the history of their field.”―Quarterly Review of Biology

“Kingsland breaks new ground by tightly linking the intellectual history of ecological science with changes in the land.”―Journal of American History

“Anyone interested in the history of American ecology and its relationship to our changing perspective on the environment will find this a worthwhile read.”―Environmental History

“The details of how the field began and the accounts of the ecological pioneers make this book an enjoyable account of scientific history.”―Brittonia

“A refreshing and novel approach that breaks new grounds in our understanding of how ecology became a dominating scientific approach to the environment.”―Centaurus

Sharon E. Kingsland is a professor of the history of science at the Johns Hopkins University.

About the Author

Sharon Kingsland is a professor of the history of science at the Johns Hopkins University.

  • ASIN : 080189087X
  • Publisher : JHUP (November 15, 2008)
  • Language : English
  • Paperback : 326 pages
  • ISBN-10 : 9780801890871
  • ISBN-13 : 978-0801890871
  • Item Weight : 1 pounds
  • Dimensions : 6 x 0.74 x 9 inches

Foundations of Ecology: Classic Papers with Commentaries: Leslie A. Real, James H. Brown

Assembled here for the first time in one volume are forty classic papers that have laid the foundations of modern ecology. Whether by posing new problems, demonstrating important effects, or stimulating new research, these papers have made substantial contributions to an understanding of ecological processes, and they continue to influence the field today.

The papers span nearly nine decades of ecological research, from 1887 on, and are organized in six sections: foundational papers, theoretical advances, synthetic statements, methodological developments, field studies, and ecological experiments. Selections range from Connell’s elegant account of experiments with barnacles to Watt’s encyclopedic natural history, from a visionary exposition by Grinnell of the concept of niche to a seminal essay by Hutchinson on diversity.

Six original essays by contemporary ecologists and a historian of ecology place the selections in context and discuss their continued relevance to current research. This combination of classic papers and fresh commentaries makes Foundations of Ecology both a convenient reference to papers often cited today and an essential guide to the intellectual and conceptual roots of the field.

Published with the Ecological Society of America.

About the Authors

Leslie A. Real is professor of biology at Indiana University. He is coeditor (with James H. Brown) of Foundations of Ecology: Classic Papers with Commentaries, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

James H. Brown is a Distinguished Professor of Biology at the University of New Mexico, and past president of the International Biogeography Society.

  • Publisher : University of Chicago Press; 1st edition (October 15, 1991)
  • Language : English
  • Paperback : 920 pages
  • ISBN-10 : 0226705943
  • ISBN-13 : 978-0226705941
  • Item Weight : 3.37 pounds
  • Dimensions : 1.5 x 7 x 9.5 inches

The Ecological Theater and the Evolutionary Play: G. Evelyn Hutchinson

In this delightful collection of essays, the author of The Enchanted Voyage and The Itinerant Ivory Tower turns his attention to the influence of environment on evolution. His discussion of the nature of the terrestrial environment we know leads to an account of possible ecological conditions on other bodies in the universe. Mr. Hutchinson also deals specifically with some influences on man’s evolution, emphasizing the extremely recondite nature of these forces. One of the other pieces looks at the relationship of natural beauty to works of art, particularly in the context of comparisons between natural history museums and art galleries. The final essay, “The Cream in the Gooseberry Fool,” is an entertaining account of an English country clergyman’s work with the European magpie moth, which resulted in one of the most significant early discoveries in genetics. The treatment throughout requires no technical learning, though the most important and modern theoretical results are cited in the footnotes.

  • Publisher : Yale University Press; First Edition (US) First Printing (January 1, 1965)
  • Language : English
  • Hardcover : 172 pages
  • ISBN-10 : 0300005865
  • ISBN-13 : 978-0300005868
  • Item Weight : 12.7 ounces
  • Dimensions : 8.5 x 5.5 x 0.5 inches