Monthly Archives: March 2021

World Health Org Officials Discuss COVID-19 Origins Report | LIVE


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WHO OFFICIALS DISCUSS COVID-19 ORIGINS REPORT: Officials from the World Health Organization who led the mission on COVID-19 origins in Wuhan, China, hold a briefing to discuss their report which will be made public today. The report states that the virus was most likely transmitted from animal to human—as was one of the original hypotheses—and does not suggest that it was created in a laboratory. Some global officials remain skeptical of the report, citing China’s interference in which parts of the country the team of researchers could and could not visit.

African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) | African Union

AfCFTA – Questions & Answers

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Africa Beyond the Headlines: AfCFTA, WTO, and Africa’s Post-COVID Economy | Harvard University Center for African Studies

Date:  Tuesday, March 30, 2021, 8:00am to 9:00am

Location: Virtual Event – Details Below

Africa Beyond the Headlines: AfCFTA, WTO, and Africa’s Post-COVID Economy

Trading under the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA) commenced on January 1, 2021, bringing together the world’s largest free trade area since formation of the World Trade Organization (WTO). Two months later, on March 1, 2021, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala was appointed to serve as the first woman and first African Director-General of the WTO. AfCFTA is anticipated to increase intra-Africa trade by more than 50%, bringing together 1.2 billion people and $2 trillion in economic activity. These developments have been described by the World Economic Forum as a “global game changer.” The panel will explore the opportunities for Africa’s post-COVID economy and the challenges that still remain under AfCFTA, including the Fourth Industrial Revolution and Africa’s transition to an industrialized economy capable of transforming livelihoods.

Speakers:

  • Dr. Joy Kategekwa
    Senior Strategy Advisor for Africa
    UNDP Regional Bureau for Africa
  • Professor Célestin Monga
    Visiting Professor of Public Policy
    Harvard Kennedy School of Government
  • Professor Euvin Naidoo
    Senior Lecturer of Business Administration
    Harvard Business School
  • Moderator: Dr. Zoe Marks, Lecturer in Public Policy, Harvard Kennedy School of Government

5:00AM PST | 8:00AM EST | 1:00PM WAT | 2:00PM CAT | 3:00PM EAT

Register here: https://harvard.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_8ZiNeTnGTxOx1tZ_OaxYQA

ORGANIZER: Harvard Center for African Studies

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The real cause of America’s greatest environmental disaster

Greg Palast– Mar 26, 2021

It wasn’t human error that caused America’s greatest environmental disaster, the #ExxonValdez​ catastrophe, it was inhuman corporate miserliness — the oil industry’s systemic fraud, corruption, and penny-pinching la-di-da view of safety. Get the real story: https://www.gregpalast.com/my-home-is…

The Climate System Tipping Points Race: Risk of Amazon Rainforest Collapse Takes the Lead


Paul Beckwith – Mar 26, 2021

In my last few videos I chatted about how our terrestrial biosphere sink is failing. Presently, land vegetation absorbs about 30% of anthropogenic carbon emissions, but with BAU (Business-as-Usual) this number is expected to halve by 2040. The terrestrial biosphere will tip over from a net carbon sink to a net carbon source. CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere will skyrocket as we head there within a mere two decades. The reason is that further warming increases plant respiration while decreasing plant photosynthesis. Sources dominate sinks.

Of course the Amazon Rainforest is the largest swath of tropical rainforest on the planet. This forest drives a partially self-sustaining regional climate and hydrological system, whereby falling rainwater is taken up by rainforest, a lot of the water is put back into the atmosphere by evapotranspiration, and the cycle repeats over and over again. Thus, water is distributed over the entire rainforest, but if the cycle is cut off at the start then the entire rainforest can suffer severe drought. Thus, with slightly more warming from climate system change, we are at great risk of the sudden complete collapse of the entire rainforest.

In this video series (3 parts) I focus on the Amazon Rainforest. I chat about a new scientific review paper called “Carbon and Beyond: The Biogeochemistry of Climate in a Rapidly Changing Amazon”. Most discussions of the Amazon Rainforest focus solely on carbon cycles and storage. This is incomplete; they need to consider the overall Amazon system, and also examine CH4, N2O, black carbon, biogenic volatile organic compounds, aerosols, evapotranspiration, and albedo changes. The dynamic responses of all of the above to localized stresses (fires, land-use changes, extreme weather events) and to global stresses (warming, drying, El Niño Southern Oscillation) must be examined to get a more complete understanding of the Amazon System.

When the overall system is studied, it becomes quite clear that the CH4 and N2O changes are large enough to offset, and even actually exceed the carbon sink of the Amazon Rainforest. This is actually terrible news for the vitality of our planetary ecosystems and human societies.


Risk of Amazon Rainforest Collapse Takes Lead Amongst Abrupt Climate Change Tipping Points


Paul Beckwith

Mar 27, 2021
In my last few videos I chatted about how our terrestrial biosphere sink is failing. Presently, land vegetation absorbs about 30% of anthropogenic carbon emissions, but with BAU (Business-as-Usual) this number is expected to halve by 2040. The terrestrial biosphere will tip over from a net carbon sink to a net carbon source. CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere will skyrocket as we head there within a mere two decades. The reason is that further warming increases plant respiration while decreasing plant photosynthesis. Sources dominate sinks.

Of course the Amazon Rainforest is the largest swath of tropical rainforest on the planet. This forest drives a partially self-sustaining regional climate and hydrological system, whereby falling rainwater is taken up by rainforest, a lot of the water is put back into the atmosphere by evapotranspiration, and the cycle repeats over and over again. Thus, water is distributed over the entire rainforest, but if the cycle is cut off at the start then the entire rainforest can suffer severe drought. Thus, with slightly more warming from climate system change, we are at great risk of the sudden complete collapse of the entire rainforest.

In this video series (3 parts) I focus on the Amazon Rainforest. I chat about a new scientific review paper called “Carbon and Beyond: The Biogeochemistry of Climate in a Rapidly Changing Amazon”. Most discussions of the Amazon Rainforest focus solely on carbon cycles and storage. This is incomplete; they need to consider the overall Amazon system, and also examine CH4, N2O, black carbon, biogenic volatile organic compounds, aerosols, evapotranspiration, and albedo changes. The dynamic responses of all of the above to localized stresses (fires, land-use changes, extreme weather events) and to global stresses (warming, drying, El Niño Southern Oscillation) must be examined to get a more complete understanding of the Amazon System.

When the overall system is studied, it becomes quite clear that the CH4 and N2O changes are large enough to offset, and even actually exceed the carbon sink of the Amazon Rainforest. This is actually terrible news for the vitality of our planetary ecosystems and human societies.

Climate System Tipping Point Sequence: Amazon Rainforest Collapse a Decent First Place Bet

Paul Beckwith – Mar 28, 2021

Please donate to http://paulbeckwith.net​ to support my research and videos as I join the scientific dots on abrupt climate system change.

In my last few videos I chatted about how our terrestrial biosphere sink is failing. Presently, land vegetation absorbs about 30% of anthropogenic carbon emissions, but with BAU (Business-as-Usual) this number is expected to halve by 2040. The terrestrial biosphere will tip over from a net carbon sink to a net carbon source. CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere will skyrocket as we head there within a mere two decades. The reason is that further warming increases plant respiration while decreasing plant photosynthesis. Sources dominate sinks.

Of course the Amazon Rainforest is the largest swath of tropical rainforest on the planet. This forest drives a partially self-sustaining regional climate and hydrological system, whereby falling rainwater is taken up by rainforest, a lot of the water is put back into the atmosphere by evapotranspiration, and the cycle repeats over and over again. Thus, water is distributed over the entire rainforest, but if the cycle is cut off at the start then the entire rainforest can suffer severe drought. Thus, with slightly more warming from climate system change, we are at great risk of the sudden complete collapse of the entire rainforest.

In this video series (3 parts) I focus on the Amazon Rainforest. I chat about a new scientific review paper called “Carbon and Beyond: The Biogeochemistry of Climate in a Rapidly Changing Amazon”. Most discussions of the Amazon Rainforest focus solely on carbon cycles and storage. This is incomplete; they need to consider the overall Amazon system, and also examine CH4, N2O, black carbon, biogenic volatile organic compounds, aerosols, evapotranspiration, and albedo changes. The dynamic responses of all of the above to localized stresses (fires, land-use changes, extreme weather events) and to global stresses (warming, drying, El Niño Southern Oscillation) must be examined to get a more complete understanding of the Amazon System.

When the overall system is studied, it becomes quite clear that the CH4 and N2O changes are large enough to offset, and even actually exceed the carbon sink of the Amazon Rainforest. This is actually terrible news for the vitality of our planetary ecosystems and human societies.

Earth Disaster | A Science Revolution

Suspicious0bservers – Mar 28, 2021

This is the last 6 months update since our book was finished. The cycle, the ongoing event, the planets, sun, and earth all continue to write the next chapter in story of the planet. https://otf.selz.com​ List of Article Links is Too Long For YouTube Description Box. You Can Search the Net for the Article Title, and if You Really Need Help, Ask in the Comment Section or Send Us an Email

Islands of plastic floating off the coasts of Central America

CGTN America
Mar 28, 2021

The accumulation of plastic debris on our oceans and rivers has led to the formation on garbage patches and floating islands non-biodegradable waste in open waters. In the Americas one of the worst cases happens out of the coast of Guatemala and Honduras.

Under Biden, will offshore wind finally drive major energy gains in the U.S.?

PBS NewsHour – Mar 28, 2021

For decades, scientists have seen vast potential for offshore wind energy. Despite this, offshore wind in the U.S. barely exists, as projects have faced local opposition and concern about how they would affect ocean habitats and fisheries. But with a new emphasis on renewable energy from the Biden Administration, that may soon change. NewsHour Weekend’s Ivette Feliciano reports from New Bedford, MA as part of our ongoing series: ‘Peril and Promise: the Challenge of Climate Change.”

Rally on Electoral College Vote Certification | C-SPAN.org

January 6, 2021

Campaign 2020

Rally on Electoral College Vote Certification

President Trump spoke at a rally in Washington, D.C., held to protest the results of the Electoral College, which Congress was set to count later that day. “We will never give up. We will never concede,” he declared. President Trump repeated his unsubstantiated claims of fraud in both the November election and the Georgia U.S. Senate runoff election held the previous night. He railed against Republicans he deemed insufficiently supportive of his efforts to overturn the results and promised to “primary the hell out of the ones that don’t fight.” The president also continued to publicly pressure his vice president, Mike Pence, to reject electoral votes in states that he lost. As the speech was concluding, Vice President Pence issued a statement saying he lacked the constitutional authority to dismiss the votes when Congress met later that day.

Note: Because of audio difficulties with the president’s microphone, there was no audio during the first 38 seconds of his remarks.

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For the larger context of this speech, see related documents and news stories:

Read: Former President Donald Trump’s January 6 speech – CNNPolitics

Text of Speech – PDF.

For the larger context of this speech, see related documents and news stories: