Daily Archives: March 15, 2021

Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology

The Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology is an international multireligious project contributing to a new academic field and an engaged moral force of religious environmentalism. With its conferences, publications, monthly newsletter, and website, it explores religious worldviews, texts, and ethics in order to contribute to environmental solutions along with science, policy, law, economics, and appropriate technology.

The Forum was founded in 1998 by Mary Evelyn Tucker and John Grim and has been based at Yale University since 2006. Please explore the About Us section for more information on the Mission, History, and Projects of the Forum.

Others have been critical to leading this work early on, especially the National Religious Partnership on the Environment, Green Faith, Interfaith Power and Light, Earth Ministry, Faith in Place, and Blessed Tomorrow in the United States. In Britain, the Alliance of Religion and Conservation (ARC) has done tireless work led by Martin Palmer with the support of Prince Philip. The European Forum for the Study of Religion and the Environment has made important contributions to advance scholarly research through conferences and publications.

…(read more).

Colloquium on the Environment Keynote Speaker: Robert Bullard

Register for the Colloquium on the Environment

Colloquium on the Environment Keynote Speaker: Robert Bullard

Renowned scholar and activist Robert Bullard will present the virtual keynote talk at Penn State’s 2021 Colloquium on the Environment.

The Quest for Environmental and Climate Justice in the U.S.
Thursday, April 1
7 p.m.

Bullard is known as the “father of environmental justice” and has spent his career studying how environmental issues disproportionately impact communities of color. Environmental justice affirms the principle that all people and communities have a right to equal protection and equal enforcement of environmental laws and regulations.

The author of 18 books on sustainable development, environmental racism, urban land use, climate justice, and community resilience, Bullard is the former dean of the Barbara Jordan-Mickey Leland School of Public Affairs at Texas Southern University and currently is a distinguished professor of urban planning and environmental policy. He is also the co-founder of the HBCU Climate Change Consortium.

Penn State’s Colloquium on the Environment is co-sponsored by IEE, the Sustainability Institute, the Office of Human Resources, Office of Educational Equity, and the Office of Diversity and Inclusion.

Register for the Colloquium on the Environment

Columbia GSAPP Event Series: Planning Futures


Streamed live on Mar 12, 2021

Columbia GSAPP

Planning Futures On Decolonial Postcolonial And Abolitionist Planning – Columbia GSAPP

Columbia GSAPP Event Series: Planning Futures


Streamed live on Mar 12, 2021

Columbia GSAPP

Planning Futures? On Decolonial, Postcolonial, and Abolitionist Planning

This one-day conference organized by Assistant Professor Hiba Bou Akar, brings leading planning and urban scholars who are re-thinking the field of urban planning and policy from postcolonial, decolonial, and abolitionist perspectives. It asks the following two interrelated questions: What are the futures of the field of urban planning, and what futures we ought to plan for when the future that is imagined in most of the world is one of state violence, dispossession, exploitation, war and conflict, pandemics, and climate change?

Conference Schedule

Introduction
9:30 am – 9:45 am
Hiba Bou Akar, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning and Director of the Post Conflict Cities Lab, Columbia GSAPP
Amale Andraos, Dean, Columbia GSAPP

Panel 1: Decentering Planning
9:45 am – 11:30 AM
Moderator: Sai Balakrishnan, Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning, UC Berkeley

Faranak Miraftab, Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Mustafa Dikeç, Professor of Urban Studies at the École d’urbanisme de Paris
AbdouMaliq Simone, Senior Professorial Fellow at the Urban Institute, University of Sheffield.
Mona Fawaz, Professor in Urban Studies and Planning, American University of Beirut

Scholars in this panel asks us to re-think planning and its actors outside the normative planning box, by attending to spatial and temporal disjunctures, uprisings, political movements, displacements, mobilities, and everyday urban life. How can we understand the making of our cities by undocumented immigrants, formerly colonized populations, religious organizations, civil society movements, and the simple majority of people who produce, negotiate, contest, and transform cities? And how can the field of planning incorporate contested pasts and alternative futures into the planning process and its imaginations?

Panel 2 Decolonizing Planning
12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Moderator: Hiba Bou Akar, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning and Director of the Post Conflict Cities Lab, Columbia GSAPP

Ananya Roy, Professor, The Meyer and Renee Luskin Chair in Inequality and Democracy at the University of California, Los Angeles
Andrea Roberts, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning and an Associate Director of the Center for Housing & Urban Development at Texas A&M University
Oren Yiftachel, Professor of Planning and Geography, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Vanessa Watson, Professor of city planning in the School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics at the University of Cape Town

What does it mean to “decolonize planning,” both normatively and in practice? How do we learn from, theorize, practice, as well as differentiate between postcolonial, decolonial, and abolitionist planning while placing these movements in their proper and distinct historical and academic contexts? And given historical and ongoing realities of settler colonialism, white supremacy, economic precarity, and neoliberal inequality, and occupation, what role can and should planners play in engaging the field’s historical origins, and what future direction(s) represent possibility and potential for the field to envision and inscribe socially just and contextually suited interventions?

Panel 3 Re-thinking Planning from the Margins
3:00 pm – 4:45 pm
Moderator: Delia Wendel, Assistant Professor of International Development and Urban Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Teresa Caldeira, Professor of Urban Planning, College of Environmental Design, University of California, Berkeley
Akira Rodriguez, Assistant Professor, City and Regional Planning, Weitzman School of Design, University of Pennsylvania
James Spencer, Vice Provost & Dean, Professor, Urban & Regional Planning, Louisiana State University
Libby Porter, Professor, Sustainability and Urban Planning, RMIT University

Margins —as geographies and positions of power, of excluded populations and neglected sites— can offer new insights to planning theory and practice. What new views of the center or the mainstream emerge when we foreground putatively marginalized perspectives? With a global and comparative group of scholars, this panel asks: how can we reconceptualize planning from the margins as well as from peripheral epistemic and ontological traditions? In parallel, what new planning theorizations could thinking from the margins bring to light?

Panel 4 Frontiers and their Politics of Planning
5:00 pm -7:00 pm
Moderator: Kian Goh, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning, University of California, Los Angeles Luskin School of Public Affairs

Katharine Rankin, Professor, Geography and Urban Planning, University of Toronto
Neema Kudva, Associate Professor, City and Regional Planning, Cornell University
Malini Ranganathan, Associate Professor, School of International Service, American University, Washington DC
Bjorn Sletto, Associate Professor, Community and Regional Planning, University of Texas at Austin
Sheryl-Ann Simpson, Assistant Professor, Geography and Environmental Studies, Carleton University

This panel challenges planning and development through the concept of the “frontier”— both as physical and imagined geography of accumulation and dispossession and political transformation, as well as a conceptual framework of futures to be imagined and steered whether of climate change or social equity. How might our understanding of frontiers in planning — across territorial, historical, and conceptual contexts — help us sift through the stakes and potentialities of planning research and practice? What are the consequences of such inequalities for equitable development? How can existing research, such as that of the panelists, on global geographies, feminist and critical theory, political ecology, and critical development studies, carry these questions forward in new ways?

Conference Schedule

Introduction
9:30 am – 9:45 am
Hiba Bou Akar, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning and Director of the Post Conflict Cities Lab, Columbia GSAPP
Amale Andraos, Dean, Columbia GSAPP

Panel 1: Decentering Planning
9:45 am – 11:30 AM
Moderator: Sai Balakrishnan, Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning, UC Berkeley

Faranak Miraftab, Professor of Urban and Regional Planning, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Mustafa Dikeç, Professor of Urban Studies at the École d’urbanisme de Paris
AbdouMaliq Simone, Senior Professorial Fellow at the Urban Institute, University of Sheffield.
Mona Fawaz, Professor in Urban Studies and Planning, American University of Beirut

Scholars in this panel asks us to re-think planning and its actors outside the normative planning box, by attending to spatial and temporal disjunctures, uprisings, political movements, displacements, mobilities, and everyday urban life. How can we understand the making of our cities by undocumented immigrants, formerly colonized populations, religious organizations, civil society movements, and the simple majority of people who produce, negotiate, contest, and transform cities? And how can the field of planning incorporate contested pasts and alternative futures into the planning process and its imaginations?

Panel 2 Decolonizing Planning
12:00 pm – 2:00 pm
Moderator: Hiba Bou Akar, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning and Director of the Post Conflict Cities Lab, Columbia GSAPP

Ananya Roy, Professor, The Meyer and Renee Luskin Chair in Inequality and Democracy at the University of California, Los Angeles
Andrea Roberts, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning and an Associate Director of the Center for Housing & Urban Development at Texas A&M University
Oren Yiftachel, Professor of Planning and Geography, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Vanessa Watson, Professor of city planning in the School of Architecture, Planning and Geomatics at the University of Cape Town

What does it mean to “decolonize planning,” both normatively and in practice? How do we learn from, theorize, practice, as well as differentiate between postcolonial, decolonial, and abolitionist planning while placing these movements in their proper and distinct historical and academic contexts? And given historical and ongoing realities of settler colonialism, white supremacy, economic precarity, and neoliberal inequality, and occupation, what role can and should planners play in engaging the field’s historical origins, and what future direction(s) represent possibility and potential for the field to envision and inscribe socially just and contextually suited interventions?

Panel 3 Re-thinking Planning from the Margins
3:00 pm – 4:45 pm
Moderator: Delia Wendel, Assistant Professor of International Development and Urban Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Teresa Caldeira, Professor of Urban Planning, College of Environmental Design, University of California, Berkeley
Akira Rodriguez, Assistant Professor, City and Regional Planning, Weitzman School of Design, University of Pennsylvania
James Spencer, Vice Provost & Dean, Professor, Urban & Regional Planning, Louisiana State University
Libby Porter, Professor, Sustainability and Urban Planning, RMIT University

Margins —as geographies and positions of power, of excluded populations and neglected sites— can offer new insights to planning theory and practice. What new views of the center or the mainstream emerge when we foreground putatively marginalized perspectives? With a global and comparative group of scholars, this panel asks: how can we reconceptualize planning from the margins as well as from peripheral epistemic and ontological traditions? In parallel, what new planning theorizations could thinking from the margins bring to light?

Panel 4 Frontiers and their Politics of Planning
5:00 pm -7:00 pm
Moderator: Kian Goh, Assistant Professor of Urban Planning, University of California, Los Angeles Luskin School of Public Affairs

Katharine Rankin, Professor, Geography and Urban Planning, University of Toronto
Neema Kudva, Associate Professor, City and Regional Planning, Cornell University
Malini Ranganathan, Associate Professor, School of International Service, American University, Washington DC
Bjorn Sletto, Associate Professor, Community and Regional Planning, University of Texas at Austin
Sheryl-Ann Simpson, Assistant Professor, Geography and Environmental Studies, Carleton University

This panel challenges planning and development through the concept of the “frontier”— both as physical and imagined geography of accumulation and dispossession and political transformation, as well as a conceptual framework of futures to be imagined and steered whether of climate change or social equity. How might our understanding of frontiers in planning — across territorial, historical, and conceptual contexts — help us sift through the stakes and potentialities of planning research and practice? What are the consequences of such inequalities for equitable development? How can existing research, such as that of the panelists, on global geographies, feminist and critical theory, political ecology, and critical development studies, carry these questions forward in new ways?

Saltwater Slavery: A Middle Passage from Africa to American Diaspora: Stephanie E. Smallwood

This bold, innovative book promises to radically alter our understanding of the Atlantic slave trade, and the depths of its horrors. Stephanie E. Smallwood offers a penetrating look at the process of enslavement from its African origins through the Middle Passage and into the American slave market.

Smallwood’s story is animated by deep research and gives us a startlingly graphic experience of the slave trade from the vantage point of the slaves themselves. Ultimately, Saltwater Slavery details how African people were transformed into Atlantic commodities in the process. She begins her narrative on the shores of seventeenth-century Africa, tracing how the trade in human bodies came to define the life of the Gold Coast. Smallwood takes us into the ports and stone fortresses where African captives were held and prepared, and then through the Middle Passage itself. In extraordinary detail, we witness these men and women cramped in the holds of ships, gasping for air, and trying to make sense of an unfamiliar sea and an unimaginable destination. Arriving in America, we see how these new migrants enter the market for laboring bodies, and struggle to reconstruct their social identities in the New World.

Throughout, Smallwood examines how the people at the center of her story-merchant capitalists, sailors, and slaves-made sense of the bloody process in which they were joined. The result is both a remarkable transatlantic view of the culture of enslavement, and a painful, intimate vision of the bloody, daily business of the slave trade.

Reviews

“Stephanie Smallwood’s Saltwater Slavery sets a new standard. It is at once a harrowing evocation of the Middle Passage, a brilliant account of the ways that Africans and Europeans made sense of the bloody process in which they were joined, and a subtle critique of the categories of historical inquiry. Here we see realized the enormous promise of a genuinely Atlantic approach to the history of American slavery.”Walter Johnson, author of Soul by Soul

“W.E.B. Du Bois called the African slave trade the ‘most magnificent drama in the last thousand years of human history.’ Stephanie Smallwood captures this drama in imaginative and innovative ways, offering a powerful account of the maritime origins of African-America amid the profound violence of the world market.”Marcus Rediker, co-author of The Many-Headed Hydra: Sailors, Slaves, Commoners and the Hidden History of the Revolutionary Atlantic

“No study of the Atlantic slave trade has attempted to penetrate the darkness of those ships’ holds, to explore what might have gone on in the minds of the hundreds of nameless people trapped below decks―until now. Smallwood gets there through a tour de force of theoretical sophistication, sensitive informed imagination, and dramatic writing. Hers is the most original and provocative book on the Middle Passage in almost half a century.”Joseph C. Miller, author of Way of Death: Merchant Capitalism and the Angolan Slave Trade 1730–1830

“Stephanie Smallwood’s Saltwater Slavery is the new starting point for studies of the Middle Passage and required reading for students of the black Atlantic.”Ira Berlin, University of Maryland, author of Many Thousands Gone

“Smallwood aims to move away from the numbers game that has ensnared so many other historians studying the Middle Passage. Instead of ledgers and account books, she uses letters, journals, and narratives from around the trade route to get closer to the slave experience itself. As the narrative follows the progress of the newly enslaved across the Middle Passage, Smallwood’s use of quotes brings to life the everyday horror experienced by ‘Saltwater Slaves,’ as Africans first arriving in the Americas were described at the time.”Kathryn V. Stewart, Library Journal

“In this stark depiction of slaves and their ‘utter alienation from the most basic norms of everyday life,’ Smallwood simultaneously delivers a lucid popular history and expands scholarly understanding of slavery with a thorough, clear-eyed look at the dreaded Middle Passage and how it shaped the slave experience… Smallwood is particularly adept at portraying, in detail, the unbearable conditions of the slave ships… Extensive research, much of it from primary sources, forms Smallwood’s basis, but she has a storyteller’s knack for well-pitched anecdotes and pointed examples.”―Publishers Weekly

“This deeply researched, tightly focused, and skillfully evocative look at the Atlantic slave trade, 1675–1725, details the experience of crossing the ocean―an ordeal fatal to many of the slaves who were forced to undertake it.”―The Atlantic

“Stephanie E. Smallwood’s excellent book Saltwater Slavery has attracted less attention than it deserves. Making careful use of the primary sources at [the National Archives at] Kew, Smallwood follows 300,000 captives taken from what is now Ghana, between 1675 and 1725, to ‘widening circles of the diaspora in the Americas.’ …An ambitious, innovative and highly successful feature of her book is to take what is known about the beliefs of the isolated societies from which slaves were taken―communities who in some cases had never seen white people, the ocean or a ship―to offer a carefully controlled imaginative reconstruction of how the embarked slaves may have conceptualized the ‘saltwater’ experience and attempted to reconcile what they saw with their existing world view.”William St. Clair, Times Literary Supplement

About the Author

Stephanie E. Smallwood is Associate Professor of History at the University of Washington, Seattle.

  • ASIN : 0674030680
  • Publisher : Harvard University Press; Illustrated edition (December 15, 2008)
  • Language : English
  • Paperback : 288 pages
  • ISBN-10 : 9780674030688
  • ISBN-13 : 978-0674030688
  • Item Weight : 9.3 ounces
  • Dimensions : 5.5 x 1 x 8.25 inches

Atlantic History: Concept and Contours, Bernard Bailyn

Atlantic history is a newly and rapidly developing field of historical study. Bringing together elements of early modern European, African, and American history–their common, comparative, and interactive aspects–Atlantic history embraces essentials of Western civilization, from the first contacts of Europe with the Western Hemisphere to the independence movements and the globalizing industrial revolution. In these probing essays, Bernard Bailyn explores the origins of the subject, its rapid development, and its impact on historical study.

He first considers Atlantic history as a subject of historical inquiry–how it evolved as a product of both the pressures of post-World War II politics and the internal forces of scholarship itself. He then outlines major themes in the subject over the three centuries following the European discoveries. The vast contribution of the African people to all regions of the West, the westward migration of Europeans, pan-Atlantic commerce and its role in developing economies, racial and ethnic relations, the spread of Enlightenment ideas–all are Atlantic phenomena.

In examining both the historiographical and historical dimensions of this developing subject, Bailyn illuminates the dynamics of history as a discipline.

Reviews

“[Atlantic History] will provoke and inspire future work in the field because it poses all the right questions: What is a civilization? What are the phenomena that tie it together? How do the participants in its making perceive it?…Perhaps the largest theme of Atlantic History is the story of how this boisterous economy stimulated thinking along liberal conceptions of individual rights and the abolition of human bondage.”Hans L. Eicholz, Claremont Review of Books

“In part thanks to Bailyn’s advocacy, inspiration, and entrepreneurship, the richness and popularity of Atlantic history have burgeoned astonishingly…Bailyn’s purpose in his short and invaluable Atlantic History is to trace and celebrate the evolution of Atlantic history as an idea, and to set out his personal interpretation of its main contours in the period between the earliest European invasions of the Americas and the American Revolution.”Linda Colley, New York Review of Books

“This work is more than a genealogy of a concept; it is a deep meditation on the nature of historical inquiry. While acknowledging the influence of public discourse, especially during the formative post-World War II period, Bailyn again and again asserts an inherent internal logic, based on “reasons that lay deep in historical thinking” as the source and motive for early explorations in Atlantic history…We are in Bailyn’s debt as perhaps the foremost proponent of Atlantic history. Through his own work and his annual “International Seminar on the History of the Atlantic World, 1500-1825” at Harvard beginning in 1995, he has trained a generation and more of young historians who account for much of the excitement and vitality in the field today.”Phyllis Whitman Hunter, Itinerario: International Journal on the History of European Expansion and Global Interaction, 2006

“As Bernard Bailyn describes in the opening pages of his most recent book, Atlantic history has rapidly become a popular and significant field within the broader discipline of history…Now, from his vantage point as one of the leading figures in this field, Bailyn has written a valedictory examination of its development and major issues. Atlantic History: Concept and Contours will serve current and future historians as both an effective introduction to the field and an advanced exploration of its historiography. As is the case with Bailyn’s many other books, Atlantic History is written in a clear and concise fashion…Regardless of the reader’s level of experience, it will be an enjoyable and fascinating exploration of a global perspective on the Atlantic world. Like so much of his scholarship, Bernard Bailyn’s most recent book is certain to find a place of prominence on required reading lists and professors’ bookshelves. I join with others in recommending it to readers.”William E. Doody, Journal of World History

“This might be one of the shorter books published by Bernard Bailyn in his long and productive career, but it promises to be one of his more influential…Atlantic History delineates a vast research agenda that calls for attention…and it also provides evidence, deriving from his own research and reflection, of just how fruitful the outcomes will be for those willing to pursue the lines and methods he suggests.”Nicholas Canny, International Journal of Maritime History

“Bailyn’s new book is…typically elegant and stylish and is intended to shape this amorphous new field by showing where Atlantic history came from and by advancing a theoretical apparatus within which Atlantic scholars should work…He brilliantly and concisely distils his past statements on how Atlantic history developed…He manages to do one of the hardest things a historian can do–describe the process by which a multitudinous world in motion came together around common themes–with skill and economy. He does much, in short, to bring order out of chaos and shows how we might begin to have a clear definition of a complex but very exciting historical subject. Once more, as so often in the past, we are in his debt.”Trevor Burnard, Journal of American Studies

“[Bailyn’s] Atlantic is a transnational and international vision of admirable, even intimidating, range…[Although] Bailyn’s method and findings will not find universal agreement, they deserve universal respect. It is a formal and methodological virtue of this style of writing that it provides material with which others can work: those of more Francophone sensibility will find here much that is ‘good to think with’; fellow empiricists will find that there is much matter in it. For that, and much else, all of us interested in the Atlantic owe Bailyn a huge debt of gratitude.”Michael Braddick, History Transnational

Bernard Bailyn was Adams University Professor, Emeritus, and James Duncan Phillips Professor of Early American History, Emeritus, at Harvard University.

  • Publisher : Harvard University Press; 0 edition (March 31, 2005)
  • Language : English
  • Hardcover : 160 pages
  • ISBN-10 : 0674016882
  • ISBN-13 : 978-0674016880
  • Item Weight : 9 ounces
  • Dimensions : 5.5 x 1 x 7.75 inches

Description and Historical Account of the Gold Kingdom of Guinea (1602) (Fontes Historiae Africanae): Pieter de Marees [Albert van Dantzig & Adam Jones, eds.]

Pieter de Marees’ history of Guinea–originally published in 1602–is one of the earliest detailed European descriptions of West African society and an essential reference for anyone interested in the precolonial period. De Marees wrote primarily about the Gold Coast (Ghana), but his work also covers Cape Verde (Senegal), Benin (Nigeria), and Cape Lopez (Gabon). This new translation includes full annotation and the original engravings.

  • Publisher : Oxford University Press (December 31, 1987)
  • Language : English
  • Paperback : 304 pages
  • ISBN-10 : 019726056X
  • ISBN-13 : 978-0197260562
  • Item Weight : 1.05 pounds
  • Dimensions : 6.13 x 0.68 x 9.19 inches

See also French re-print editions:

Description

et récit historial du riche royaume d’or de Guinea, aultrement nommé la Coste d’or de Mina, gisante en certain endroict d’Africque. [Reprint] (1605.) [Leatherbound]

and

Seller: Gyan Books Pvt. Ltd., Delhi, India
Contact seller

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=30647464831&searchurl=kn%3DPieter%2Bde%2BMarees%26sortby%3D17&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp1-_-title10

and another French reprint edition:

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=15525388636&searchurl=kn%3DPieter%2Bde%2BMarees%26sortby%3D17&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp1-_-title22

original at:
https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=21220252250&searchurl=spo%3D30%26sortby%3D17%26kn%3DPieter%2Bde%2BMarees%26p%3D2%26sp%3D1&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp2-_-title4

This volume covers the first-hand account of Pieter de Marees’s first Dutch expedition to Guinea, 1600-01. Pieter de Marees’ history of Guinea, originally published in 1602, is one of the earliest detailed European descriptions of West African society and an essential reference for the precolonial period. De Marees wrote primarily about the Gold Coast (Ghana), but his work also covers Cape Verde (Senegal). This work he “discusses the Slave Coast and the Portuguese participation in the traffic”. (Postma, The Dutch in the Atlantic Slave Trade, 1600-1815, p. 13).

Soil Not Oil Coalition – Videos

Videos from the Coalition

Bill Gates: “How to Avoid a Climate Disaster” & Driving Innovation |The Dai ly Social Distancing Show

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

Feb 17, 2021

Bill Gates discusses his new book “How to Avoid a Climate Disaster,” shares some concrete steps people can take to reduce carbon emissions and urges the government to take a more proactive stance on climate change.

Bill Gates: How to Avoid a Climate Disaster


Streamed live on Feb 25, 2021

Chicago Humanities Festival

Streamed live on Feb 25, 2021

In this urgent, authoritative book, How to Avoid a Climate Disaster, Bill Gates sets out a wide-ranging, practical—and accessible—plan for how the world can get to zero greenhouse gas emissions in time to avoid a climate catastrophe.

Gates has spent a decade investigating the causes and effects of climate change. With the help of experts in the fields of physics, chemistry, biology, engineering, political science, and finance, he has focused on what must be done in order to stop the planet’s slide toward certain environmental disaster. In this book, he not only explains why we need to work toward net-zero emissions of greenhouse gases, but also details what we need to do to achieve this profoundly important goal. At CHF, Gates is joined by Dax Shepard and Monica Padman (Armchair Expert podcast) for a conversation about the solutions we have and the breakthroughs we need to save the planet.

This program is generously underwritten by Northern Trust.

This program presented in partnership with Seminary Co-op Bookstores and Literati Bookstore.