Daily Archives: February 4, 2021

Empire on the Nile: The Anglo-Egyptian Sudan, 1898-1934 | M. W. Daly

This is the first comprehensive survey of the political and economic history of the Sudan from the establishment of the Anglo-Egyptian Condominium in 1898 until 1934. Based mainly on unpublished sources in the Sudan, Britain, and elsewhere, the book provides much information on important aspects of government and administration, Sudanese-British relations, early modern politics, and economic and social developments. It also analyses issues in Condominium history (such as indirect rule, the rise of neo-Mahdism, the crisis of 1924) in the light of previously unused archival material, offering insights and interpretations. Illustrated with contemporary photographs and including an extensive bibliography of unpublished sources, Empire on the Nile is essential background for an understanding of the social and economic issues confronting the Sudan today, and serves also as a case study in British imperial rule in Africa and the Middle East.

Empire on the Nile provides essential background for an understanding of the social and economic issues confronting the Sudan today, and serves also as a case study in British imperial rule in Africa and the Middle East.

M. W. Daly has published widely on the history of the Sudan and has received many honors and awards, including fellowships from the universities of Durham, Khartoum, and Tel Aviv, as well as residencies at Oxford, Durham, the Woodrow Wilson Center (Washington, DC), and elsewhere.  (See:

  • Publisher : Cambridge University Press; 1st Edition (October 9, 1986)
  • Language : English
  • Hardcover : 542 pages
  • ISBN-10 : 052130878X
  • ISBN-13 : 978-0521308786
  • Item Weight : 2.05 pounds

Barbara Harrell-Bond, founding Director — Refugee Studies Centre – Oxford University

View full documentary:

Through the prism of an extraordinary life, this documentary explores the achievements of Barbara Harrell-Bond – academic, refugee activist and a life-long advocate for refugee rights.

The film takes us on a personal journey of a not-so-ordinary woman born in a remote town in South Dakota during the Great Depression. It traces her career from her initial engagement with the civil rights movement in the US in the late Fifties, to her move to the UK in the mid-Sixties where she studied social anthropology at the University of Oxford in the 1960s. Then the film follows her on her travels to West Africa where she carried out much of her academic research.

Her first-hand experience of the Saharawi refugee camps in Algeria in 1980, and the humanitarian crisis in Sudan in 1982, led her to establish the refugee studies programme in Oxford, and numerous others around the world. A very strong advocate of legal aid programs for refugees in the Global South, Barbara endeavoured also to pioneer and established a number of these programs including in Uganda, Egypt, South Africa and the UK.

Far from being only an academic, the focus of Barbara’s life-long work has been on improving refugee rights in practice, and on keeping refugees at the centre of humanitarian interventions. .Issues which still resonate today, in an age in which safe havens for refugees are increasingly being eroded and violations of human rights are on the rise.

Director: Enrico Falzetti
Written by Katarzyna Grabska and Enrico Falzetti
Produced by Katarzyna Grabska in collaboration with AMERA Int.
Documentary, 58 min.

Please keep Barbara’s commitment to refugees, and contribute to the Barbara Harrell-Bond Foundation: barbaraharrellbond.org/

* * * * *

Barbara Harrell-Bond, OBE, Emerita Professor and Founding Director of the Refugee Studies Centre

Dr Barbara Harrell-Bond, OBE, Emerita Professor, was a legal anthropologist who founded the Refugee Studies Centre in 1982 and directed it until 1996. Prior to this she conducted research in West Africa from 1967-1982, while employed by the Departments of Anthropology, University of Edinburgh and University of Illinois-Urbana, the Afrika Studiecentrum in Leiden, and the Faculty of Law, University of Warwick. On her retirement from the RSC, she conducted research in Kenya and Uganda (1997-2000), and was Honorary Adjunct Professor at the American University in Cairo (2000-2008). She wrote the seminal text Imposing Aid: Emergency Assistance to Refugees in 1982.

An unflinching advocate of legal aid programmes for refugees and research and teaching in refugee studies in the Global South, Barbara was a driving force behind the establishment of a number of programmes in countries including Uganda, Egypt, South Africa, and the UK. She was responsible for the information portal www.refugeelegalaidinformation.org (Rights

in Exile) that promotes legal assistance for refugees around the world. In 2013, Rights in Exile became the refugee rights component of the International Refugee Rights Initiative, which issues the monthly refugee legal aid newsletter, Rights in Exile.

Barbara was awarded the Order of the British Empire (OBE) in 2005 for services to refugee and forced migration studies. Barbara was also a recipient of the Franz Boas Award for Exemplary Service to Anthropology awarded by the American Anthropological Association, and received the Lucy Mair Medal for Applied Anthropology in 2014. In July 2016, she was awarded an honorary doctorate at the School of African and Asian Studies (SOAS), University of London.

In 2018, a documentary was made about Barbara’s life, titled ‘Barbara Harrell-Bond: A life not ordinary’. We were extremely pleased to welcome her to the Refugee Studies Centre on 20 June 2018, World Refugee Day, for a special screening among family and friends.

Far from being only an academic, the focus of Barbara’s life-long work was on refugee rights, and on keeping refugees at the centre of humanitarianism, issues which resonate even more deeply now, in an age when asylum and protections for refugees appear daily more endangered.

Barbara Harrell-Bond died on 11 July 2018 at her Oxford home. She is survived by her three children, David Harrell-Bond, Stephen Harrell-Bond and Debbie Bond.

Obituaries and tributes

Emeritus Professor Roger Zetter (RSC) wrote an obituary for the The Guardian, commenting that Barbara transformed humanitarian practice (the ‘humanitarian industry’ as she called it) from “its paternalistic and self-justifying modes of action”. Her book Imposing Aid, he says, delivered a devastating critique of the humanitarian regime and fundamentally changed how humanitarian organisations worked. He ends, “Countless people benefited from Barbara’s skill in developing their testimonies and her advocacy for their claims for refugee status. Millions more who do not know her name will benefit from her relentless efforts to create ways of treating refugees humanely.” Read the full obituary here. Roger also wrote an obituary for the Journal of Refugee Studies.

BBC Radio 4’s programme Last Word remembered Dr Harrell-Bond in an episode on Sunday 22 July 2018, featuring contributions from Professor Roger Zetter and Dr Laura Hammond of SOAS. Writing for IRIN News, Dr Hammond states that “refugees around the world lost an irreplaceable champion with the passing of Dr. Barbara Harrell-Bond.”

Themba Lewis writes on the Rights in Exile website that “It would be difficult to overstate her contribution to refugee rights and to legal anthropology, and impossible to quantify her impact on the lives or refugees, students, colleagues, and institutions around the globe.”

A Statement on the Passing of Barbara Harrell-Bond was made by Filippo Grandi, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees.

The Financial Times published an obituary describing Barbara as “a once-in-a-generation force of nature”.

For Al-Fanar Media, Parastou Hassouri (who worked for 3 years at AMERA, a charity founded by Barbara) pays tribute to Barbara, recalling their first meeting when Barbara says to her “So you think you can save the world? I hope you don’t plan on sleeping much.”

Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture

Each year in Michaelmas term, the RSC holds the Annual Harrell-Bond Lecture. Recent speakers have included Professor Walter Kälin (Envoy of the Chairmanship of the Nansen Initiative, and Professor of Constitutional and International Law, University of Bern), Patrick Kingsley (journalist, ex-Migration correspondent at The Guardian, now at the New York Times), Dr Jemilah Mahmood (Under-Secretary General for Partnerships, IFRC), and Pierre Krähenbühl (UNRWA Commissioner-General).

* * * * * *

Barbara Harrell-Bond: a life not ordinary

Through the prism of an extraordinary life, this documentary explores the achievements of Barbara Harrell-Bond – academic, refugee activist and a life-long advocate for refugee rights.

The film takes us on a personal journey of a not-so-ordinary woman born in a remote town in South Dakota during the Great Depression. It traces her career from her initial engagement with the civil rights movement in the US in the late Fifties, to her move to the UK in the mid-Sixties where she studied social anthropology at the University of Oxford in the 1960s. Then the film follows her on her travels to West Africa where she carried out much of her academic research.

Her first-hand experience of the Saharawi refugee camps in Algeria in 1980, and the humanitarian crisis in Sudan in 1982, led her to establish the refugee studies programme in Oxford, and numerous others around the world. A very strong advocate of legal aid programs for refugees in the Global South, Barbara endeavoured also to pioneer and established a number of these programs including in Uganda, Egypt, South Africa and the UK.

Far from being only an academic, the focus of Barbara’s life-long work has been on improving refugee rights in practice, and on keeping refugees at the centre of humanitarian interventions. .Issues which still resonate today, in an age in which safe havens for refugees are increasingly being eroded and violations of human rights are on the rise.

Director: Enrico Falzetti
Written by Katarzyna Grabska and Enrico Falzetti
Produced by Katarzyna Grabska in collaboration with AMERA Int.
Documentary, 58 min.

Please keep Barbara’s commitment to refugees, and contribute to the Barbara Harrell-Bond Foundation: barbaraharrellbond.org/

See related:

Heilemann: Everyone In The Republican Party ‘Lives In Fear Of What It’s Become’ | Deadline | MSNBC

MSNBC – Feb 3, 2021

MSNBC national affairs analyst John Heilemann argues that members of the Republican party have shown through their capitulation to Trump that they care more about losing votes than anything else, and it has rendered their party to ‘a pile of ashes on the ground, or something worse’. Aired on 2/3/2021.

China’s COVID Secrets (full documentary) | FRONTLINE

FRONTLINE PBS | Official
Feb 2, 2021

Support your local PBS station here: http://www.pbs.org/donate
Chinese scientists and doctors, international disease experts and health officials reveal missed opportunities to suppress the outbreak and lessons for the world in “China’s COVID Secrets.” Directed by Jane McMullen, this 90-minute documentary reveals the gulf between what China knew and what it told the world. A coproduction with the BBC.

How Europe Underdeveloped Africa | Davis, Angela Davis, Walter Rodney

First Edition:

Publisher: Bogle-L’Ouverture Publications, London
Publication Date: 1972
Binding: Paperback
Edition: First Edition.

Review

“Rodney’s analysis remains as relevant as it was when first published—a call to arms in the class struggle for racial equality.”
Los Angeles Review of Books

“A masterpiece.”
—Andy Higginbottom, Redline

“Appearing in 1972, How Europe Underdeveloped Africa was a genuine tour de force. It fused, as had never been done in a single volume before, African history in the global sense and underdevelopment theory, Marxism and black nationalism, intellectual passion and political commitment. How Europe Underdeveloped Africa instantly joined a select pan-Africanist canon that would be read at least as much outside as within the academy, an exclusive category that included the two texts that had greatly influenced Rodney’s intellectual development, notably James’s Black Jacobins and Williams’s Capitalism & Slavery, along with Black Reconstruction, W. E. B. Dubois’s magisterial work on the struggle for democracy in the United States during the post-Civil War, post-slavery era. How Europe Underdeveloped Africa, however, differed from the above-mentioned works, which were written long after the events they charted occurred. How Europe Underdeveloped Africa, by contrast, was more urgent and immediate, having been produced in the heat of battle, which is to say amid the ongoing struggle of Africans against capitalist and neocolonialist underdevelopment. His purpose in writing the book, Rodney explained in the Preface, was ‘to try and reach Africans who wish to explore further the nature of their exploitation, rather than to satisfy the ‘standards’ set by our oppressors and their spokesmen in the academic world.”
—Michael West, Groundings

About the Author

Walter Rodney was an internationally renowned historian of colonialism and a leader of Black Power and Pan-African movements across the diaspora, most notably the Guyanese Working People’s Alliance. His life and work brought together struggles for independence on the African continent with the strivings of the black working classes of North America and the Caribbean basin. On June the 13th, 1980, Rodney was assassinated, most likely by the then-president of Guyana. He was 38 years old.

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Imperfect Foods — Groceries on a mission

Imperfect Foods– Sep 19, 2019

If food can be saved, we will save it.
With every bite into a misshapen apple, scarred almond, or oversized egg, we can shape our world for the better.
We are Imperfect Foods, and we’re proud to deliver groceries on a mission. Join the Imperfect mission: https://imperfectfoods.com
Join the Imperfect mission: https://imperfectfoods.com