Daily Archives: November 26, 2020

Boris Johnson unveils tough new tiers for millions in England – BBC Newsnight

BBC News

Nov 26, 2020

55 million people across England will be in the two toughest levels of measures when lockdown ends next week. What’s the rationale for the new tier system? Please subscribe HERE http://bit.ly/1rbfUog

Tougher rules for England will “strike a balance” when the national lockdown ends next week, UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said.

At a Downing Street briefing, the prime minister acknowledged that the stricter three-tiered system of regional measures to tackle coronavirus would bring “heartbreak and frustration”.

Most of England will be in the toughest two levels of measures from 2 December and the system will be reviewed every two weeks, with the first review scheduled for 16 December – so an area’s tier level may change before Christmas.

Policy Editor Lewis Goodall reports and Kirsty Wark is joined by former health secretary Andrew Lansley, Labour shadow minister Cat Smith and former chair of Pizza Express Luke Johnson, Labour shadow minister Cat Smith and former chair of Pizza Express Luke Johnson

Interviewing Neighbors During COVID Brought Her Light “When Things Seemed So Dark.” – StoryCorps

Leverett, MA. – Portia’s town center.

Transcript below:

Leverett, Massachusetts is a rural town of about 1,800 people in the western part of the state. Downtown Leverett, if you can call it that, consists of a church, a post office, and the town hall. You can drive through town without stopping — there are no traffic lights in Leverett. If you need groceries, there’s just one store.

“It’s a beautiful place with not a lot going on,” says Leverett resident Jinny Savolainen. “An exciting moment in town is when the cows get loose and they’re in the road.”

Link to Full Interview

Transcript:

Jinny Savorlainen (JS), Betsy Neisner (BN), Portia Weiskel (PW), and Mary Hankinson (MH)

Host: Now for something a little different — a portrait of a rural town under quarantine.

Jinny Savolainen (JS): I’m Jinny Savolainen. And I’ve been interviewing my neighbors here in Leverett, Massachusetts.

Host: When her small town went into lockdown, Jinny wanted to do something meaningful with her time. She had lost her daughter in 2019. And when the pandemic hit, she lost her job.

So she sent an email to the town list-serve asking people to talk about life during COVID.

Let’s hear some of those StoryCorps Connect recordings now, with Jinny as our guide.

Jinny Savolainen (JS): One of the people I spoke with was Betsy Neisner.

Betsy Neisner (BN): Fear – I don’t do fear.

JS: (laughs)

BN: You know, I’ve had advanced cancer for 18 years, so I have made my peace with uncertainty.

JS: Another person I interviewed was Portia Weiskel.

Portia Weiskel (PW): I heard about people applauding to express gratitude for essential workers. And I thought, ”What are we gonna do in Leverett?” And I said, ”Howling.” It’s a funny moment where you go out there and say, ”Who’s going to howl first?”

JS: Mary Hankinson is our local mask maker.

Mary Hankinson (MH): What I thought would be just handing out 15 or 20 masks, we’ve made hundreds.

JS: Mary is a nurse and she told me what it was like inside the nursing home where she works.

MH: When people get sick, they’re transferred to a COVID unit. You watch them go out the door and you think, ”I’m never going to see you again. I don’t get to hug you while you’re dying.” In all my years there, I have never let anyone die alone and yet we have been forced to. And I remember one woman, she was an old farmer. And she was spunky. I like spunky little old ladies. And she said, ”They tell me I have that virus.” And I said, ”Well, your test is out. We don’t know that you have it.” So, of course her test came back positive. That was the point at which the tears came. You know?

JS: They’re very lucky to have you.

MH: Being a recent widow. I really miss companionship. I’m okay while I’m doing something. It’s when it’s time to take a break and that’s when I go, ”Crap, I wish I could talk to somebody other than the dog.”

JS: Mhm.

MH: And actually I do talk to the dog a lot. And if they ever invent something where they can figure out how to get all the thoughts out of a dog’s mind, I’m screwed. (laughs)

JS: Doing these interviews gave me a sense of purpose and meaning that I badly needed. Just when things seemed so dark, I found some light in the words of the people all around me.

JS: I’m curious if you had advice or words of wisdom?

Ellen: To not hold on to how things were before this and what we’re missing.

PW: I just think that we need to remind ourselves of how amazing it is to be alive at all. I feel that so deeply.

MH: I hope that we do carry the lessons of kindness, because I think we have learned lessons. Even if you’re not able to articulate them all the time, they’re there. We are changed as a people.

For Native Peoples, Thanksgiving Isn’t A Celebration. It’s A National Day Of Mourning | Here & Now

 

Kisha James’ grandfather (center) carrying a box. In the box are the Wampanoag human remains he and other National Day of Mourning protesters liberated from the Pilgrim Museum in 1974. (Courtesy of guest)

This year marks the 400th anniversary of pilgrims arriving at what’s now known as Plymouth, Massachusetts.

The so-called first Thanksgiving has been celebrated and taught to schoolchildren as the origin story of what would later become the United States. But many Native Americans say Thanksgiving Day is a reminder of the slaughter of millions of Indigenous people and the theft of their lands by outsiders.

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The United American Indians of New England declared Thanksgiving a National Day of Mourning 50 years ago. In 1970, the descendants of the pilgrims wanted to hold a banquet to celebrate the anniversary of the Mayflower landing in Plymouth and asked a Wampanoag man named Wamsutta Frank James to make a speech, says his granddaughter, Kisha James.

The banquet organizers invited Wamsutta Frank James to speak on one strict condition: He needed to provide a copy of the speech in advance. Under the guise of editing for spelling and grammar, their true motivation was to check the content, Kisha James says.

Her grandfather’s speech didn’t praise the pilgrims as their descendants wanted.

“They told him that he absolutely under no circumstances could give the speech that he was planning on giving and they offered to write him a different speech,” she says. “They were quite angry about the speech he wrote because it told the truth about Thanksgiving.”

Wamsutta Frank James by statue of Massasoit, in Plymouth, MA on the National Day of Mourning in the 1970s. (Courtesy of guest)

Wamsutta Frank James refused to give the edited speech, his granddaughter says. Instead, he and a group of supporters met atop Coles Hill in Plymouth on Nov. 27, 1970, to commemorate the first National Day of Mourning.

While millions of fellow Americans carve turkeys to celebrate Thanksgiving, 21-year-old Kisha James attends the National Day of Mourning every year.

…(read more).

The apentema (aka Apentemma)- 18th century| The British Museum

The British Museum – Africa Collection

Object Type

drum

Museum number

Am,SLMisc.1368

Description

Drum (Apentemma) goblet shaped open drum with a hollow pedestal, the main body made of wood (Cordia africana), with six wood pegs (Baphia nitida), a skin head (deer or antelope?) and cord made of two main vegetable fibres (Clappertonia ficfolia and Raphia) – among others – which is around the head of the drum and attached to the pegs; there is a coating on the…

Production ethnic group

Made by: Akan

Production date

18thC

Production place

Made in: Ghana

Africa: sub-Saharan Africa: Ghana

Excavator/field collector

Field Collection by: Clerk

Findspot

Found/Acquired: Virginia (state)

Americas: North America: USA: Virginia (state)

Materials

camwood (Baphia nitida)

deer skin (?)

antelope skin (?)

african cordia

fibre (Clappertonia ficifolia and Raphia)

Dimensions

Diameter: 24 centimetres

Height: 41 centimetres

Width: 28 centimetres (at widest)

Inscriptions

· Inscription type: annotation

· Inscription position: on the drum’s surface

· Inscription language: English

· Inscription content: A Drum from Virginia

· Inscription note: Handwritten in pen

Curator’s comments

The apentema (aka Apentemma) was made in the early 18th century and would have been part of one of any number of drum groups or ensembles from West Africa – fontomfrom , Adowa, Kete or Abofoe. the drum is played with an open hand, not sticks.

Bibliographic references

Romanek 2010 / To the beat of the drum

King 1999 / First Peoples, First Contacts: Native Peoples of North America (p.79)

MacGregor 1994 / Sir Hans Sloane : collector, scientist, antiquary, founding father of the British Museum (p. 234, p. 243 (note 93))

Vlach 1978 / The Afro-American Tradition in Decorative Arts (p.20, fig.5)

Watkins 1976 / A Plantation of Differences – People from Everywhere (p.75, fig.51)

Braunholtz 1970 / Sir Hans Sloane and Ethnography (pl. 17, pp. 20-27)

Braunholtz 1953 / The Sloane Collection: Ethnography (pl. VIII)

Bushnell 1906 / The Sloane Collection in the British Museum (pp. 676-678, pl. XXXV)

MacGregor 2010 / A History of the World in 100 Objects (86)

Location

On display (G26/dc3)

Exhibition history

Exhibited:

1976, National Museum of History and Technology, Smithsonian Institution; A Nation of Nations
1994-1999 Oct-May, Merseyside Maritime Museum, Liverpool; Transatlantic Slavery Gallery
1999-2010 25 Jun-9 Aug, BM Room 26; Gallery of North America, Case: “The Southeastern Woodlands”
2010 10 Aug-12 Oct, BM Room 3; Akan Drum: The…

Associated ethnic name

Associated with: African-American

Acquisition name

Bequeathed by: Sir Hans Sloane

Acquisition date

1753

Acquisition notes

The Sloane register records that this drum was acquired from a Mr. Clerk of Virginia, then a British colony, by Hans Sloane in the early eighteenth century. The records suggest that Clerk may have collected it from an “Indian” group, although its association with the slave trade is clear based on the African materials and origin.

Department

Africa, Oceania and the Americas

Registration number

Am,SLMisc.1368

Additional IDs

CDMS number: Am1753D10.1368 (old CDMS no.)

Conservation

Treatment

Treatment

Treatment

Related objects

Trump Rambles on Speakerphone During Fake GOP Voter Fraud Hearing: A Closer Look


Late Night with Seth Meyers

Seth takes a closer look at Trump and his gang of very bad lawyers laying the groundwork to spend four years baselessly claiming the election was stolen from him.

PA Lt. Governor To Trump Lawyer Giuliani: Where’s The Voter Fraud? | The 11th Hour | MSNBC

MSNBC

Nov 26, 2020

Rudy Giuliani and Donald Trump are still attacking Pennsylvania’s election results. The commonwealth’s Lt. Governor John Fetterman says the evidence for that fraud simply does not exist. Aired on 11/26/2020.

Objects of Crisis: The Akan drum

The British Museum

Sep 7, 2020

In our penultimate episode of Objects of Crisis Hartwig talks with former deputy chair of the Museum trustees, Bonnie Greer, about an object that is very close to her heart- the Akan drum. To find out more about the Akan drum, visit Collection online on the Museum website: https://www.britishmuseum.org/collect…

You can also read Bonnie’s blog piece, ‘What we have saved from the fire’, here: https://blog.britishmuseum.org/bonnie…

Images: Plan of slave ship: Plymouth Chapter of the Society for Effecting the Abolition of the Slave Trade / Public domain Illustration of sailor on a slave ship suspending an African girl by her ankle from a rope over a pulley. Captain John Kimber stands on the left with a whip in his hand: Attributed to Isaac Cruikshank, 1756?-1811? / Public domain

Box | The British Museum – Africa Collection

The British Museum – Africa Collection

Object Type

box, gold-dust-box

Related objects

Museum number

Af1993,02.396

Description

Lost wax casting, in brass, in the form of a box (for gold-dust?) with decorated lid.

Production ethnic group

Made by: Akan

Production date

18thC-20thC

Production place

Made in: Ghana

Africa: sub-Saharan Africa: Ghana

Findspot

Found/Acquired: Ghana

Africa: sub-Saharan Africa: Ghana

Materials

brass

Technique

lost-wax cast

Dimensions

Height: 2.80 centimetres (a+b)

Height: 2.30 centimetres (a)

Height: 0.90 centimetres (b)

Width: 3.60 centimetres (a)

Width: 3.50 centimetres (b)

Depth: 3.30 centimetres (a)

Depth: 3.50 centimetres (b)

Location

Not on display

Condition

Good.

Acquisition name

Bequeathed by: William Buller Fagg

Acquisition date

1993

Acquisition notes

see Eth.Doc.121.

Department

Africa, Oceania and the Americas

Registration number

Af1993,02.396

Africa | British Museum

Discover Africa…

Our African collection represents the rich and diverse history of a continent, from the beautiful bronze-casting of Igbo-Ukwu, Ife and Benin to objects that delve into the ritual of masquerade – traditional performances that express the secret knowledge of local communities.

Explore the stories of Africa at the Museum.

Visit the Africa gallery
Search the Collection

William Ansah Sessarakoo, 1749 |The British Museum

The British Museum
Object Type
print
Museum number
1902,1011.1867
Title
Object: William Ansah Sessarakoo
Description
Portrait seen half-length to right within oval frame, eyes to front. 1749
Mezzotint with some scratched lines
Producer name
Print made by: John Faber the Younger
After: Gabriel Mathias
School/style
British
Production date
1749
Materials
paper
Technique
mezzotint
Dimensions
Height: 328 millimetres
Width: 225 millimetres
Inscriptions

Inscription type: inscription
Inscription content: Lettered (by scraping out the mezzotint ground) with production detail “G. Mathias Pinxt.” and “J Faber fecit 1749.” on oval frame within image, and with 6 lines of title, account of the sitter’s family, kidnapping and retrieval, a dedication in the name of the painter to the Earl of Halifax and “Price 1s: 6p”, all below image

Curator’s comments
See also Sheila O’Connell, ‘London 1753’, BMP 2003, no. 3.85.
Bibliographic references
Chaloner Smith 1883 / British Mezzotinto portraits from the introduction of the art to the early part of the present century (323.II)
Location
Not on display
Exhibition history
2007 Mar-Jun, London, National Portrait Gallery, ‘Between Worlds:…’
Subjects
black
slave/slavery
Associated names
Portrait of: William Ansa Sasraku
Associated with: George Montagu Dunk, 2nd Earl of Halifax
Associated places
Associated with: Ghana
Africa: sub-Saharan Africa: Ghana
Acquisition name
Bequeathed by: William Meriton Eaton, 2nd Baron Cheylesmore
Acquisition date
1902
Department
Prints and Drawings
Registration number
1902,1011.1867