Peter Mitchell, ‘The Archaeology of Africa’s Islands: Colonizing and Being Colonized’ | The Hutchins Center for African & African American Research

Peter Mitchell, University of Oxford

The Archaeology of Africa’s Islands: Colonizing and Being Colonized

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Peter Mitchell is Professor of African Archaeology at the University of Oxford and Tutor and Fellow in Archaeology at St Hugh’s College, Oxford. After completing his undergraduate degree at Cambridge, he took his doctorate at Oxford and then worked in Cape Town and Wales before taking up his present posts in 1995.

As well as continuing to research the archaeology of hunter-gatherers in southern Africa, where he has excavated extensively in Lesotho, he has a strong interest in both the broader, comparative aspects of the African past and human relations with animals.

Key books that have appeared as a result include: The Archaeology of Southern Africa (2002), African Connections: An Archaeological Perspective on Africa’s Relations with the Rest of the World (2005), The First Africans: African Archaeology From the Earliest Toolmakers to Most Recent Foragers (with Larry Barham, 2008), Horse Nations: The Worldwide Impact of the Horse on Indigenous Societies Post-1492 (2015), and The Donkey in Human History: An Archaeological Perspective (2018).

He is co-editor with Paul Lane of The Oxford Handbook of African Archaeology, a past President of the Society of Africanist Archaeologists, and Hon. Secretary of the British Institute in Eastern Africa.

Peter Mitchell

Associate Professor of African Prehistory
Tutor and Fellow in Archaeology

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