Daily Archives: October 13, 2020

“Let the People Decide!” Protests at Amy Coney Barrett Hearing Decry GOP Po wer Grab, Attack on ACA

Democracy Now!

Oct 13, 2020

Hundreds protested outside the Senate Monday against the confirmation hearing for President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Judge Amy Coney Barrett. At least 21 were arrested after staging a sit-in to oppose the Senate pushing through Barrett’s nomination in the middle of the presidential election. Senate Democrats warn the federal judge’s record suggests she would overturn the Affordable Care Act and threaten reproductive rights if she takes the seat left vacant by the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. “Trump and the Republicans are trying to execute a power grab,” says Ana María Archila, co-executive director of the Center for Popular Democracy, who joins us from the steps of the U.S. Supreme Court ahead of another day of protests. Amid the coronavirus pandemic, she says lawmakers should instead focus on doing “everything they can to provide urgent relief to millions of people.”

Packing the Courts: How Republicans Spent Decades Installing Judges to Cement Minority Rule

Democracy Now!

Oct 13, 2020

Amid Senate confirmation hearings for Amy Coney Barrett, we look at how conservatives have used dark money to push to seat her on the Supreme Court before the November 3 election, following a decades-long project by conservatives to install right-wing judges across the federal judiciary. “There’s no doubt that what we’re facing is increasingly rule by a minority,” says former Senate Judiciary Committee staffer Lisa Graves, executive director of True North Research. “When people say that the court needs to be packed, it really needs to be unpacked.”

A Rigged Judiciary Leads to Rigged Elections: Ari Berman on Barrett Hearings & GOP Voter Suppression

Democracy Now!

Oct 13, 2020

Amy Coney Barrett’s involvement in the court fight over the 2000 presidential election, when she was a member of George W. Bush’s legal team, shows she is willing to bend the law to benefit Republican candidates, says Mother Jones reporter Ari Berman. “That’s what’s so disturbing about Amy Coney Barrett, because that’s exactly what President Trump wants to do right now,” says Berman. “He wants a justice who will rule his way on the vote count, no matter what the facts or the law actually says.” Berman also looks at challenges voters are facing nationwide as early voting is underway from Georgia to Arizona, where the Pascua Yaqui Tribe filed a lawsuit Monday to reinstate the only early in-person voting site on the reservation, which was shut down in 2018.

Uncanny Parallels: How India in the 2020s resembles Italy in the 1920s

Hitler and Mussolini in Munich, Germany, June 18, 1940. Hitler was at a high point, as his army accomplished a string of victories and was completing its conquest of continental Western Europe.
Shutterstock

I read a lot of biographies, these often set in other countries than my own. A book I have just finished is Benedetto Croce and Italian Fascism, by the Canadian scholar, Fabio Fernando Rizi. It uses the life of a great philosopher to tell a larger story of the times he passed through.

Reading Rizi’s book, I found uncanny parallels between the Italy of the 1920s and the India of the 2020s. The myth of Benito Mussolini, like the myth of Narenda Modi, was crafted by writers and propagandists “eager to sing paeans to the genius of the Duce.” These propagandists had begun to call the leader of fascism “the providential man”, “the man of massive faith”, or simply, “the Man of Providence”. Thus was created “the myth of the Duce, the chief who is always right, the leader who dares where others vacillate.”

In December 1925, the Italian State passed a new law, which came down hard on the press and its freedoms. The consequences of this law were that “within a few months, the most important papers came under Fascist control, one by one. Some owners were compelled to sell under economic or political pressure. All the liberal editors had to resign and were replaced by more accommodating men.”

…(read more).

For additional related material see: http://www.ramachandraguha.in/

3rd India Lecture: Ramachandra Guha on “Why Gandhi Matters”


D’Amore-McKim School of Business

Oct 23, 2018

Ramachandra Guha, an award-winning biographer and historian, brought the Indian leader to life Thursday night at Northeastern in a lecture hosted by the university’s Center for Emerging Markets, which is directed by Distinguished Professor Ravi Ramamurti. The presentation was based on his newly-released biography, Gandhi: The years that changed the world (1914-1948), which tells the story of Gandhi’s three-decade effort to liberate India from British rule while seeking to unify his polarized nation.

Learn more: http://www.damore-mckim.northeastern….

3rd India Lecture, Part 2: Ramachandra Guha on “Five Fault Lines of Contemporary India”

D’Amore-McKim School of Business

Oct 23, 2018

Ramachandra Guha, an award-winning biographer and historian, brought the Indian leader to life Thursday night at Northeastern in a lecture hosted by the university’s Center for Emerging Markets, which is directed by Distinguished Professor Ravi Ramamurti. The presentation was based on his newly-released biography, Gandhi: The years that changed the world (1914-1948), which tells the story of Gandhi’s three-decade effort to liberate India from British rule while seeking to unify his polarized nation.

Learn more: http://www.damore-mckim.northeastern….

For additional related material see: http://www.ramachandraguha.in/

The Challenge of Contemporary History| Dr. Ramachandra Guha @Godrej

Godrej Archives

Sep 28, 2018

The 11th Godrej Archives Annual Lecture was delivered by Dr. Ramachandra Guha, a historian and biographer based in Bangalore.

For additional related material see: http://www.ramachandraguha.in/

Ramachandra Guha: “The Three Waves of Environmentalism in India”

devschooluea

Oct 14, 2016

Ramachandra Guha, Indian historian and writer, speaking on “The Three Waves of Environmentalism in India” at the annual Piers Blaikie Lecture at UEA on 5th October 2016. Filmed & edited by dominicjoycefilm.com

For additional related material see: http://www.ramachandraguha.in/

Talk on ‘History Beyond Chauvinism’ by Dr. Ramchandra Guha

Ashoka University   Dec 13, 2018

Ashoka University hosted a guest lecture by Dr. Ramchandra Guha, Historian and Author on 13 December 2018 on ‘History Beyond Chauvinism.’ Dr. Guha was in conversation with Prof. Rudrangshu Mukherjee, Chancellor and Professor of History at Ashoka University. Watch the full session here!

(+ linked series of lectures & talks…)

For additional related material see: http://www.ramachandraguha.in/

Heroic Africans: Legendary Leaders, Iconic Sculptures


The Met

Sunday at the Met, November 20, 2011

Delve into the installation and commemoration rites that defined important individuals immortalized by artists in West and Central Africa through major sculptural traditions. The afternoon’s speakers explore this larger context that informs a range of distinctive cultural aesthetics.

Lectures:
Enshrining Greatness through African Sculpture
Alisa LaGamma, curator, Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas, The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Competing for Fame and Glory: Kings and Their Arts in the Cameroon Grassfields
Christraud M. Geary, Teel Senior Curator of African and Oceanic Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston

Powerful Men and Beautiful Women in Chokwe and Luluwa Leadership Arts
Constantine Petridis, curator of African Art, Cleveland Museum of Art

Related Exhibition:
Heroic Africans: Legendary Leaders, Iconic Sculptures
September 21, 2011 — January 29, 2012

The exhibition is made possible in part by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, The Ceil & Michael E. Pulitzer Foundation, Inc., and the National Endowment for the Arts.
The exhibition catalogue is made possible by The MCS Endowment Fund.

Bárbaro Martínez Ruiz: ”Seeing Things as They Are: Annotating African in Cuban Art”

Afro-Latin American Research Institute Harvard University

Oct 12, 2020

The lecture, part of the Seminar Series on Afro-Latin American Studies, covers a global debate on Western representations of African and Afro-Cuban art with particular attention to issues such as how aesthetic concepts, museum politics, art display, colonialism, identity practices, and nationalism intersect across a global diaspora. It explores questions of representation of African art and culture from primary sources and in the context of avant-garde and contemporary art in Cuba. It also considers the proliferation of African art in the collections of major institutions worldwide and will query the dichotomy between viewing ‘African’ artistic practices in the diaspora as either influenced by the (‘modern’) cultures of the West or by traditional (‘primitive’) non-Western cultures.