Daily Archives: August 16, 2020

Longtime GOP strategist says he’ll ‘work with Democrats’ to defeat Trump


PBS NewsHour

Published on Aug 5, 2020

Stuart Stevens is one of the Republican Party’s most successful campaign strategists, with a career spanning decades. In his revealing new book, “It Was All a Lie: How the Republican Party Became Donald Trump,” Stevens admits the GOP uses race as an issue to divide Americans and win elections — and says the party has abandoned its principles in the Trump era. He joins Judy Woodruff to discuss.

Bernie Sanders: ‘Trump Is The Most Dangerous President In American History’ | MSNBC


MSNBC

Published on Aug 16, 2020

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont says his long-term goal after electing Biden is to “rally the American people around the progressive agenda.”» Subscribe to MSNBC:

Trump Family Will Make Tons Of Money Off GOP Convention


The Ring of Fire

Published on Aug 16, 2020

Even though the Republican Convention is going digital, there will still be enough “live” events happening in Washington, D.C. to ensure that people show up. That’s why the President’s campaign strategically planned to hold these live events in areas that are adjacent to his D.C. hotel. This will help to corral people into his business, therefore lining the pockets of the President while also spending the week praising him. Ring of Fire’s Farron Cousins explains what’s happening.

Exposing the Shadow World Created by Journalists and Government Officials: The American Press


The Film Archives

Published on Aug 16, 2020

Journalism in America began as a “humble” affair and became a political force in the campaign for American independence. About the book: https://amzn.to/3h3xJ88

Following independence, the first amendment to the U.S. Constitution guaranteed freedom of the press and speech and the American press grew rapidly following the American Revolution. The press became a key support element to the country’s political parties but also organized religious institutions.

During the 19th century, newspapers began to expand and appear outside eastern U.S. cities. From the 1830s onward the penny press began to play a major role in American journalism and technological advancements such as the telegraph and faster printing presses in the 1840s helped expand the press of the nation as it experienced rapid economic and demographic growth.

By 1900 major newspapers had become profitable powerhouses of advocacy, muckraking and sensationalism, along with serious, and objective news-gathering. In the early 20th century, before television, the average American read several newspapers per day. Starting in the 1920s changes in technology again morphed the nature of American journalism as radio and later, television, began to play increasingly important roles.

In the late 20th century, much of American journalism merged into big media conglomerates (principally owned by media moguls, Ted Turner and Rupert Murdoch). With the coming of digital journalism in the 21st Century, newspapers faced a business crisis as readers turned to the internet for news and advertisers followed them.

Journalism historian David Nord has argued that in the 1960s and 1970s:

“In journalism history and media history, a new generation of scholars . . . criticised traditional histories of the media for being too insular, too decontextualised, too uncritical, too captive to the needs of professional training, and too enamoured of the biographies of men and media organizations.”[64]

In 1974, James W. Carey identified the ‘Problem of Journalism History’. The field was dominated by a Whig interpretation of journalism history.

“This views journalism history as the slow, steady expansion of freedom and knowledge from the political press to the commercial press, the setbacks into sensationalism and yellow journalism, the forward thrust into muck raking and social responsibility….the entire story is framed by those large impersonal forces buffeting the press: industrialisation, urbanisation and mass democracy.

O’Malley says the criticism went too far, because there was much of value in the deep scholarship of the earlier period.

AMAZON UNDER THREAT: A Global Climate Emergency


NV atCEPImperial

Published on Aug 16, 2020

The Amazon rainforest, home to over 30 percent of the world’s species, is often referred to as the “lungs of the planet.” Every year, the world emits approximately 40 billion tons of carbon into the atmosphere. The Amazon rainforest absorbs 2 billion tons of carbon per year, making it a significant player in preventing climate change. Brazil has been a persistent leader in environmental diplomacy and effective climate policies. The international conventions on climate change and ecological diversity, for instance, originated during the historic 1992 United Nations Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. There, Brazil played a vital role in addressing disputed issues between environmental conservation and international trade. Brazil also emphasized the important role indigenous people play in conserving the environment through traditional practices. But, that legacy is now under threat. Since Brazil’s new president, Jair Bolsonaro, took office in 2018, various government departments committed to climate change have been shut down. The former army captain and far-right leader prioritizes economic development over environmental security, with an emphasis on Brazil’s massive agricultural industry. During his presidential campaign, Bolsonaro received the backing of the agribusiness lobby, which is one of the country’s most dominant congressional associations. On April 11, 2019, Bolsonaro issued Presidential Decree No. 9760 to investigate environmental fines imposed by IBAMA for environmental damage, an effective measure to deter illicit deforestation of the Amazon and other fragile biomes. The removal of the Amazon’s few protections, including the suspension of indigenous reservations such as Raposa Serra do Sol, has also been recommended based on the justification that the area is too big for its natives. Brazil’s indigenous people occupy 13 percent of land area, which is under high risk of multinational companies that export beef to places including Hong Kong, China, and the European Union. Brazil is the largest exporter of beef globally, supplying 20 percent of the world’s total exports. Last year, the country transported 1.64 million tons of meat – the highest amount in history – producing $6.57 billion in revenue according to the Brazilian Beef Exporters Association. Wildfires in the Amazon are not unusual, but their method of spreading the last few years has been alarming. Throughout the Amazon’s history, the rainforest was comparatively fire-resistant due to its natural humidity and moisture. Wildfires in the Amazon today are the result of a combination of regional deforestation, economic policies and anthropogenic climate change. Deforestation in the Amazon is pushing the forest into a drier, savanna-like ecosystem with weak biodiversity. In the states of Pará and Mato Grosso, where Brazil’s agricultural development has spread into the forest basin, wildfires and deforestation have increased. The World Wildlife Fund estimates that 27 percent of the Amazon will be without trees by 2030 if the current rate of deforestation persists. Additional factors escalating deforestation include the increase of soy plantations and cattle ranching in the Andean Amazon nations, including Peru and Bolivia. The Amazon’s deforestation problem is not the responsibility of a single country; it is crucial to have combined policies and actions across and beyond the borders of Brazil. By placing restrictions on Bolosonaro’s harsh climate policies, the international community can enforce sanctions on companies with corrupt supply chains, target leading lawbreakers, boycott products, and support public protests. Simultaneously, one of the most effective ways to preserve the Amazon is by working with beef and cattle industries. Many international importers and exporters are raising concern over greening their supply chains, by abiding to zero-carbon standards as the backlash over the Amazon continues. The Responsible Commodities Facility, the world’s first green chain promoting sustainable trading and production, disclosed its intent to issue low-interest credit channels to Brazilian corn and soy producers. Farmers who abstain from clearing forests for food production are eligible to gain up to $1 billion over the next four years. There is no doubt that a combination of incentives and fines is necessary to promote better governance of the Amazon basin. A healthy Amazon is not only a priority for the international community, but also for Brazilians at a local level, who risk experiencing disrupted water supplies and severe droughts due to the effects of rising deforestation. If the Amazon is destroyed, the increasing emissions will accelerate global warming

Trump’s Postmaster General CAUGHT Profiting Off Destroying The Post Office


The Ring of Fire

Published on Aug 16, 2020

Louis Dejoy, the postmaster general that Donald Trump installed to destroy the post office, still is holding large amounts of investments in competitors to the postal service that are now bringing in huge dollars due to DeJoy’s destruction of the post. This is about as criminal as you could get, and DeJoy must immediately be called to testify as part of an investigation. The crimes are so blatant and this administration almost seems to get off on it, as Ring of Fire’s Farron Cousins explains. Link – https://www.rawstory.com/2020/08/trum…

Exposing the Shadow World Created by Journalists and Government Officials: The American Press


The Film Archives

Published on Aug 16, 2020

Journalism in America began as a “humble” affair and became a political force in the campaign for American independence. About the book: https://amzn.to/3h3xJ88

Following independence, the first amendment to the U.S. Constitution guaranteed freedom of the press and speech and the American press grew rapidly following the American Revolution. The press became a key support element to the country’s political parties but also organized religious institutions.

During the 19th century, newspapers began to expand and appear outside eastern U.S. cities. From the 1830s onward the penny press began to play a major role in American journalism and technological advancements such as the telegraph and faster printing presses in the 1840s helped expand the press of the nation as it experienced rapid economic and demographic growth.

By 1900 major newspapers had become profitable powerhouses of advocacy, muckraking and sensationalism, along with serious, and objective news-gathering. In the early 20th century, before television, the average American read several newspapers per day. Starting in the 1920s changes in technology again morphed the nature of American journalism as radio and later, television, began to play increasingly important roles.

In the late 20th century, much of American journalism merged into big media conglomerates (principally owned by media moguls, Ted Turner and Rupert Murdoch). With the coming of digital journalism in the 21st Century, newspapers faced a business crisis as readers turned to the internet for news and advertisers followed them.

Journalism historian David Nord has argued that in the 1960s and 1970s:

“In journalism history and media history, a new generation of scholars . . . criticised traditional histories of the media for being too insular, too decontextualised, too uncritical, too captive to the needs of professional training, and too enamoured of the biographies of men and media organizations.”[64]

In 1974, James W. Carey identified the ‘Problem of Journalism History’. The field was dominated by a Whig interpretation of journalism history.

“This views journalism history as the slow, steady expansion of freedom and knowledge from the political press to the commercial press, the setbacks into sensationalism and yellow journalism, the forward thrust into muck raking and social responsibility….the entire story is framed by those large impersonal forces buffeting the press: industrialisation, urbanisation and mass democracy.

O’Malley says the criticism went too far, because there was much of value in the deep scholarship of the earlier period.

How Black immigrant Mainers are fighting COVID-19


PBS NewsHour

Published on Aug 16, 2020

Despite low rates of COVID-19 infections, Maine has the largest racial disparity of infection rates in the country. Special Correspondent Kira Kay reports that Black immigrant Mainers have been disproportionately affected and that state aid needed to fight the virus has been slow to reach them. The story is part of our ongoing series, “Chasing The Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America.” Special Thanks: James Myall

Mitch McConnell Is Single Handedly Causing Another Recession


The Ring of Fire

Published on Aug 16, 2020

Republicans in the Senate, lead by Mitch McConnell, are refusing to create a new Coronavirus Relief Package that includes aid to the states to combat the disease and keep their economies running. As a result, economists predict that we could see a sudden and intense shrinking of state economies and rising unemployment rates across the country, all because of this move by Mitch McConnell. Ring of Fire’s Farron Cousins explains what’s happening.

Weekly Address: Celebrating the National Museum of African American History and Culture

The Obama White House
Sep 24, 2016

In this week’s address, President Obama commemorated the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. The President recognized the museum for celebrating the many accomplishments of the African American community – and for telling the fuller story of America by facing the uncomfortable truths of our Nation’s history all while embracing the knowledge that America is a constant work in progress. The National Museum of African American History and Culture not only tells the African American story – it tells the American story. By telling the fuller account of the American story, the President said, the museum will give all of us a chance to reflect and set the course for generations to come.