Daily Archives: March 7, 2020

How women in Iowa are leading farmland conservation efforts

PBS NewsHour

Mar 7, 2020

Each year, produce like corn and soybeans are grown on millions of acres of Iowa farmland. While the bulk of the farming is conducted by men, roughly half of the state’s farmland is owned, or co-owned, by women. Mark Bittman recently spoke with farm owner Jean Eells about the role women are playing in sustainable agriculture as part of our “Future of Food” series with Pulitzer Center support.

Food-matters,

 

 

Is Greta Thunberg Over-Reacting About Climate Change? | Good Morning Britain

Good Morning Britain

Mar 4, 2020

Today Greta Thunberg will visit the European Parliament to discuss future laws and environmental targets. The 17-year-old has led a global movement through climate change strikes and marches. But is Greta really representative of what the world’s young people really think? Is she inspiring change or causing unnecessary alarm?

Broadcast on 04/03/2020

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Could spring impact the spread of the coronavirus (COVID-19)?

The Weather Network

Mar 3, 2020

The transition into warmer seasons with increased humidity can hinder the spread of some viruses, including the coronavirus (COVID-19). https://www.theweathernetwork.com/ca/… Captured a weather video or photo that you want to share? Join The Weather Network community by signing up and submitting your videos or photos.

Coronavirus and warm weather: Explaining the potential impact of seasonality

Washington Post
Mar 3, 2020

President Trump has repeatedly suggested warm weather could slow the spread of the novel coronavirus. It appears he is referencing seasonality, which describes how active a virus is depending on the climate. In other words, the idea that people get sick more often in the winter. Health experts say that for this strain of the coronavirus, which continues to spread across the globe, it’s too early to know if seasonality will have an impact. There are still too many unknowns to predict what will happen to the virus in warmer months. Even if the novel coronavirus does dissipate in the currently impacted areas, it may find new life in the tropics and southern hemisphere. And that migration between hemispheres can actually prolong the lifespan of the disease. Experts say this means the virus could exist year round.

Read more: https://wapo.st/2TlUc74.

How the Trump administration squandered time and lost control of the coronavirus crisis – The Washington Post

Over the past month, President Trump has regularly sought to downplay the coronavirus threat with a mix of facts and false statements. (Video: JM Rieger/Photo: Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post)

By Ashley Parker,

Yasmeen Abutaleb and

Lena H. Sun

March 7, 2020 at 2:19 p.m. EST

The coronavirus had already begun to spiral out of control when Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, during routine Senate testimony, made a surprising claim.

“As of today, I can announce that the CDC has begun working with health departments in five cities to use its flu surveillance network to begin testing individuals with flu-like symptoms for the Chinese coronavirus,” Azar said. “This effort will help see whether there is broader spread than we have been able to detect so far.”

But there were two major problems: the cities weren’t ready and the tests didn’t work.

In fact, when Azar’s team had sent his prepared remarks to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention before delivery, the agency pushed back and urged him to soften his language. State health departments had not yet been informed of the plans — and were certain to be upset by them — and the coronavirus test kits contained a faulty component that caused a spike in inconclusive results. Azar announced the plans anyway, in part because “it would be really valuable for him [to] have the news,” as one HHS official put it in an internal email.

 

 

BU Launches Coronavirus Website | BU Today | Boston University

 

See: COVID-19 Information

March 2, 2020
BU Today staff

Does Boston University have a coordinated plan for the coronavirus? Yes.

With so many uncertainties with a fast-moving situation, BU on Monday launched a new website of frequently asked questions to address some of the most pressing coronavirus issues facing the University community, from housing to academics to health and safety to communication to residence life and dining services and more.

University officials have been meeting daily and communicating with students, parents, faculty, and staff, both in Boston and at programs across the United States and around the world. The University already had in place a response plan for major infectious diseases, and that plan has now been updated to specifically address the coronavirus (COVID-19).

The website will be updated regularly with answers to frequently asked questions, resources, and new information as it becomes available. To submit a question, click on the individual subject matter and there is a form for comments at the bottom of the story.

Read all of BU Today’s ongoing coverage of the coronavirus situation here.

See: COVID-19 Information

and:

 

 

Should I be worried about coronavirus at Boston University?


Boston University

Jan 30, 2020

Learn more about the coronavirus and how it impacts the Boston University community.