Daily Archives: February 24, 2020

Democracy for Sale?


MoveToAmend



Published on Jan 9, 2011

The Supreme Court’s “Citizens United” case unleashed corporations to have an even greater influence on both our political process and our politicians.

In reaction the Monahan brothers decided to walk across the country to raise awareness of the corruption of our system, that this ruling would inevitably cause.

“It’s Viral!” The Movement to Overturn Citizens United Swamps the Internet

Jay Harris



Published on Jan 9, 2012

Comedian Lee Camp (“Moment of Clarity”) helps democracy advocates take their message about the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision “viral.” Starring Katrina vanden Heuvel of The Nation, Jim Hightower, Laura Flanders, Cenk Uygur of The Young Turks, and Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield of Ben & Jerry’s. Cute cats, babies, Mentos and More! Concept/Produced by Negin Farsad, Justin Krebs, Vaguely Qualified Productions, and Living Liberally. Exec produced by the We the People Campaign.

Directed by Negin Farsad Produced by Justin Krebs/Living Liberally & Negin Farsad/Vaguely Qualified Productions in collaboration with the We the People Campaign Edited by Mark Lechner Written by Lee Camp with Negin Farsad Concept by Negin Farsad, Justin Krebs, Lee Camp, Katie Halper Cinematography by Adam Barton and Blair Johnson Music by Gaby Alter & Paris, Ontario

facebook.com/wethepeoplecampaign gabyalter.com/ http://www.neginfarsad.com http://www.leecamp.net http://www.livingliberally.org http://www.vaguelyqualified.com http://www.nativeresonance.com http://www.drinkingliberally.org

Overpopulation facts – the problem no one will discuss: Alexandra Paul at TEDxTopanga


TEDx Talks

Actress Alexandra Paul breaks the silence on one of the most taboo subjects of our time: human overpopulation and how to resolve the crisis that is adding 220,000 more people to the planet every day. In this fact filled talk, Alexandra discusses the overpopulation problems of 7 billion humans multiplying at a rate of 1 billion more people every 12 years and offers a simple solution: Transform negative cultural attitudes about the Only Child, and celebrate the short and long term benefits of small families.

Alexandra reminds us that coercion in any form is not the answer to changing cultural and biological norms. Instead, rewiring our biology through strong cultural messaging, education of girls and empowerment of women are the solutions to stopping the current momentum towards 10 billion people on the planet in 40 years.

Alexandra emphasizes that because each American born uses so many more resources than someone from a developing country, it is equally important that wealthy countries have small families. She discusses the economic tradeoffs of a smaller population in a world where capitalism reigns: because the capitalist system depends upon more and more consumers, there are strong forces at work to keep the numbers of people on earth growing. But at what expense?

And since human numbers cannot keep getting larger forever, at what point will we change our ways? When it is too late?

Most controversially, Alexandra believes that, if humans are to survive on this planet, the ideal family has one child and the ideal number of people on earth is 2 billion. “If that is too radical, then it is time for radicalism. Too much is at stake to be polite.” This talk is full of overpopulation facts.

Actress Alexandra Paul breaks the silence on one of the most taboo subjects of our time: human overpopulation and how to resolve the crisis that is adding 220,000 more people to the planet every day. In this fact filled talk, Alexandra discusses the overpopulation problems of 7 billion humans multiplying at a rate of 1 billion more people every 12 years and offers a simple solution: Transform negative cultural attitudes about the Only Child, and celebrate the short and long term benefits of small families. Alexandra reminds us that coercion in any form is not the answer to changing cultural and biological norms. Instead, rewiring our biology through strong cultural messaging, education of girls and empowerment of women are the solutions to stopping the current momentum towards 10 billion people on the planet in 40 years. Alexandra emphasizes that because each American born uses so many more resources than someone from a developing country, it is equally important that wealthy countries have small families. She discusses the economic tradeoffs of a smaller population in a world where capitalism reigns: because the capitalist system depends upon more and more consumers, there are strong forces at work to keep the numbers of people on earth growing. But at what expense? And since human numbers cannot keep getting larger forever, at what point will we change our ways? When it is too late? Most controversially, Alexandra believes that, if humans are to survive on this planet, the ideal family has one child and the ideal number of people on earth is 2 billion. “If that is too radical, then it is time for radicalism. Too much is at stake to be polite.” This talk is full of overpopulation facts.

 

Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg on reducing poverty amid rising inequality | YaleNews

Pinelopi Koujianou Goldberg (Photo credit: Christina Felschen/German Academic Exchange Service)

February 21, 2020

Millions of poor people in developing countries in East Asia have escaped the threat of hunger by leaving the fields to work in factories producing manufactured goods to sell in the West. So, what happens to the prospects of the world’s poor when the West stops buying?

Pinelopi (Penny) Koujianou Goldberg, the Elihu Professor of Economics at Yale and outgoing chief economist of the World Bank Group, has thought deeply about it. Her recent research explores the extent to which cross-border trade reduces poverty in developing countries and the effects the current trade war with China is having on the U.S. economy.

In advance of her Feb. 27 delivery of the 30th annual Kuznets Lecture, Goldberg spoke with YaleNews about how changes in world politics affect approaches to reducing poverty, particularly in Africa — and how Simon Kuznets’ best known theory, about a tradeoff between growth and inequality in the early stages of development, may be affected by recent developments in a world marked by inequality.

Kuznets (1901-1985), a Nobel laureate in economics instrumental in founding the Yale Economic Growth Center, studied the interactions among growth, inequality, and poverty reduction. Goldberg’s lecture is titled “Poverty Reduction in the Era of Waning Globalization.”

Economic growth is often cited as the tide that will lift all boats — and China and India’s roles in reducing total world poverty are often seen as important testaments to that. Yet, many fast-growing Asian countries are also seeing the gap widen between the very rich and very poor. Looking ahead, how do you see the relationship between growth, inequality, and poverty evolving?

It is true that growth is highly correlated with poverty reduction. It would be hard to deny that, even though we have examples where growth did not generate poverty reduction. Usually that happens where growth is associated with huge inequalities. There are plenty of examples, especially in African countries, where wealth is concentrated in the hands of a few. In such cases, even when the tide rises, only very few boats rise. Growth doesn’t trickle down and doesn’t improve the lot of the poor.

Kuznets was most famous for the Kuznets Curve, which posits that there is a tradeoff in the early stages of development between growth and inequality. One point I want to make in the lecture is that we live at a very different time, when the world is changing rapidly, retreating from globalization. Many fear that the old model of export-led industrialization is no longer going to be relevant. And I want to make the point that in this new world, a certain degree of equality and growth may be complements and not substitutes. To put it in a different way, you cannot have growth unless you have a certain degree of equality.

…(read more).

Yale-Pres-Economist

 

 

 

Harvard, Yale accused of failing to report millions of foreign funding


RT

Feb 23, 2020
Authorities have accused two of America’s top universities – Harvard and Yale – of failing to report millions of dollars of funding from states like Russia, China and Iran.

Empty shelves as coronavirus fears spark food shortages in northern regions of Italy

RT

Feb 24, 2020
Residents of the small commune of Rozzano outside Milan lined up at grocery store. Driven by fears of the rapidly-spreading coronavirus, Italians in the Lombardy region have begun stockpiling food and basic necessities, leaving shops in a post-apocalyptic-looking state

Nature Is Speaking – Edward Norton is The Soil | Conservation International (CI)

Conservation International

Oct 5, 2014

Julia Roberts, Harrison Ford, Edward Norton, Penélope Cruz, Robert Redford and Ian Somerhalder all join forces to give nature a voice.

Watch the films and take action at: http://ci-intl.org/1OiRBh3

See related

 

The Soil Story by Kiss The Ground


Kiss The Ground   Aug 31, 2015

WATCH the follow up, The Compost Story! http://bit.ly/2ov6zf8
MIRA LA VERSION EN ESPAÑOL AQUI! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m-y9q

Science meets inspiration in this tale of nature’s best hidden innovation: soil.

The Soil Story, created by Kiss the Ground, is a five-minute film that shares the importance of healthy soil for a healthy planet.

Learn how we can “sequester” (store) carbon from our atmosphere, where it is harmful, and pull it back into the earth, where it belongs, through regenerative agriculture, composting, and other land management practices.

The film was directed in partnership with Louis Fox, best-known for the acclaimed viral series, “The Story of Stuff”.

LEARN: http://www.kisstheground.com

See related:

 

 

 

Imperial College MSc in Environmental Technology


NV atCEPImperial



Published on Feb 23, 2020

The MSc in Environmental Technology was established over three decades ago, and provides the highest standard of knowledge and skills development for environmental specialists.

The term technology in the course title refers to the application of scientific knowledge, policy and engineering to solve environmental problems and address sustainability.

You will acquire a diverse range of discipline-specific problem-solving frameworks for tackling contemporary environmental issues, while combining the natural and social sciences with engineering and medicine in a truly interdisciplinary manner.

A major emphasis of the course is on the way environments function and on the compatible tools, alternative technologies and policies for sustainable environmental management.

There are specialist options available in the second term, designed to cater for a variety of individual interests and career requirements.

You complete a research project which normally stems from one of the specialist options. The project term extends from April to September, with the whole of this period devoted to the project.

Your project may be laboratory or desk-based and can involve fieldwork. Projects are usually carried out in conjunction with outside organisations, and can take place in the UK or abroad.

See https://www.imperial.ac.uk/study/pg/e…