Daily Archives: July 28, 2019

A Colombian student helps stop blast fishing to protect the environment

Published on Jul 28, 2019
A marine biology student is trying to end an extreme way of fishing in Colombia.

Blast fishing is a form of fishing in which explosives are used to increase a fisherman’s catch.

In addition to killing hundreds of fish, it also shatters coral reefs. In many places it’s illegal.

But Colombia is a country where fishermen still employ the practice.

Colombia has coastlines along both the Pacific Ocean and the Caribbean Sea. Its waters contain 2,600 marine species.

Meet Our Game Changer Yassandra Barrios.

Watch CGTN LIVE on your computer, tablet or mobile http://america.cgtn.com/livenews

Under Brazil’s Far Right Leader, Amazon Protections Slashed and Forests Fall – The New York Times

By Letícia Casado and Ernesto Londoño
July 28, 2019

BRASÍLIA — The destruction of the Amazon rain forest in Brazil has increased rapidly since the nation’s new far-right president took over and his government scaled back efforts to fight illegal logging, ranching and mining.

Protecting the Amazon was at the heart of Brazil’s environmental policy for much of the past two decades. At one point, Brazil’s success in slowing the deforestation rate made it an international example of conservation and the effort to fight climate change.

But with the election of President Jair Bolsonaro, a populist who has been fined personally for violating environmental regulations, Brazil has changed course substantially, retreating from the efforts it once made to slow global warming by preserving the world’s largest rain forest.

While campaigning for president last year, Mr. Bolsonaro declared that Brazil’s vast protected lands were an obstacle to economic growth and promised to open them up to commercial exploitation.

…(read more).

Climate Change and National Security: A Conversation with Dr.Rod Schoonover Tickets, Tue, Jul 30, 2019 at 2:00 PM

Date and Time
Tue, July 30, 2019
2:00 PM – 3:00 PM EDT

Add to Calendar

Location

World Resources Institute, James A. Harmon Conference Center
10 G Street Northeast
Suite 800
Washington, DC 20002

View Map

Description

Join us for a discussion of climate, science, and security in the first public appearance by Dr. Rod Schoonover since leaving the U.S. government.

Up until resigning on July 12, Dr. Rod Schoonover was arguably the top remaining U.S. government official working on climate change and national security. He served for over a decade as a Senior Analyst in the State Department’s Bureau of Intelligence and Research and was Director of Environment and Natural Resources at the National Intelligence Council in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence which produces the annual Worldwide Threat Assessment of the U.S. Intelligence Community. Last month, Dr. Schoonover testified before the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence on the national security implications of climate change. While he delivered his oral testimony to the Committee, the written submission for the Congressional record was blocked by the White House over disputes about the underlying science, as has been widely covered in the media.

Join the World Resources Institute on July 30 for an in-depth conversation between Dr. Schoonover and Andrew Light, WRI Distinguished Senior Fellow and former State Department senior climate change official. They will discuss the relationship between climate change and national security, how the U.S. and the world can better prepare for the security implications of a warming world, and the current state of climate science in the U.S. federal government.

Speakers

  • Dr. Rod Schoonover, Former Senior Analyst, Bureau of Intelligence and Research, U.S. Department of State
  • Andrew Light, Distinguished Senior Fellow, WRI

How can India tackle its water crisis? – BBC News

BBC News

Published on Jul 3, 2019

“Twenty-one of India’s major cities may run out of ground water as early as 2020 according to a government report. Some experts contest that assessment but daily water woes are a part of life for almost half of the country’s population.

The southern city of Chennai, where reservoirs are drying up due to a delayed monsoon and poor water management, is severely affected. Residents there have been queuing up to collect water from rationed government services, and schools, hospitals and restaurants are struggling to cope. Meanwhile, the Indian government has set up a new Jal Shakti (water power) Ministry, and is proposing a massive project to interlink India’s rivers as an answer to the water crisis.

We focus on water conservation and management solutions to India’s water crisis. We speak to a water activist based in Chennai who restores lakes and ponds, the head of a Delhi-based non-profit that works to recharge groundwater, and a water expert who specialises in rural irrigation economy and policy making.

Presenter: Devina Gupta

Contributors: Aditi Mukherjee, Principal Researcher, International Water Management Institute; Jyoti Sharma, President, FORCE Non-profit; Arun Krishnamurthy, Founder, Environmentalist Foundation of India

Chennai water crisis: city comes to a standstill as reservoirs run dry


Business Today
Published on Jun 20, 2019

Hotels in Chennai are rationing water, schools are giving over early and the city is coming to a standstill as water crisis worsens. Employees in companies such as Fiat Chrysler, TCS, Wipro and Cognizant have been asked to cut down on water use in canteens. It is the worst water shortage Chennai has faced in the last four years due to a delayed monsoon and reservoirs running dry. Watch the video for more.

India’s Geography Problem

Wendover Productions

Published on Dec 5, 2017

Why is India growing so fast? | CNBC Explains

CNBC International

Published on Jul 5, 2018

India is poised to be the world’s fastest-growing major economy this year. CNBC’s Xin En Lee explains what the world’s second most populous economy has going for it.