Daily Archives: July 27, 2019

World Civilizations: Sources, Images and Interpretations

World Civilizations: Sources, Images and Interpretations, Volume 1

Photographs, illustrations, maps, charts, and texts are celebrating the arrival of a larger size and beautiful colors to the fourth edition of World Civilizations: Sources, Images, and Interpretations. This collection of primary, secondary, and visual sources for world history survey courses offers a broad introduction to the materials historians use and the interpretations historians make.

This text also provides introductions, commentaries, guides, and questions, making it a truly valuable source for world history courses. The selections and accompanying notes, drawn from a vast spectrum of approaches, provide insight into how historians work and place the material in a context that furthers readers’ understanding.

World Civilizations: Sources, Images and Interpretations, Volume 2: Dennis Sherman, A. Tom Grunfeld, David Rosner, Linda Heywood

Photographs, illustrations, maps, charts, and texts are celebrating the arrival of a larger size and beautiful colors to the fourth edition of World Civilizations: Sources, Images, and Interpretations. This collection of primary, secondary, and visual sources for world history survey courses offers a broad introduction to the materials historians use and the interpretations historians make. This text also provides introductions, commentaries, guides, and questions, making it a truly valuable source for world history courses. The selections and accompanying notes, drawn from a vast spectrum of approaches, provide insight into how historians work and place the material in a context that furthers readers’ understanding

Soundings in Atlantic History: Latent Structures and Intellectual Currents, 1500-1830 : Bernard Bailyn, Patricia L. Denault, Stephen D. Behrendt, Linda Heywood, John Thornton, David Hancock, Wim Klooster, J. Gabriel Martínez-Serna, Rosalind Beiler, Jorge Cañizares-Esguerra, Neil Safier, Londa Schiebinger, Beatriz Dávilo, Emma Roths child, Mark Allen Peterson

These innovative essays probe the underlying unities that bound the early modern Atlantic world into a regional whole and trace some of the intellectual currents that flowed through the lives of the people of the four continents. Drawn together in a comprehensive Introduction by Bernard Bailyn, the essays include analyses of the climate and ecology that underlay the slave trade, pan-Atlantic networks of religion and of commerce, legal and illegal, inter-ethnic collaboration in the development of tropical medicine, science as a product of imperial relations, the Protestant international that linked Boston and pietist Germany, and the awareness and meaning of the Atlantic world in the mind of that preeminent intellectual and percipient observer, David Hume.

In his Introduction Bailyn explains that the Atlantic world was never self-enclosed or isolated from the rest of the globe but suggests that experiences in the early modern Atlantic region were distinctive in ways that shaped the course of world history.

Captive Passage: The Transatlantic Slave Trade and the Making of the Americas: Edward Reynolds, Linda M. Heywood, et al., Beverly C. McMillan, Collection of the Mariners’ Museum, Newport News, Virginia

Written by a team of historians under the auspices of the Smithsonian Institution, Captive Passage examines the complex causes, outcomes and legacies of the 400-year transatlantic slave trade. The physical, social and emotional meaning of the Middle Passage is explored, as are the history of the abolitionist movement and the struggle for racial justice. This impressive 8 1/2 x 11 book contains over 200 photos of art and artifacts as well as historical figures and documentation.

Central Africans and Cultural Transformations in the American Diaspora: Linda M. Heywood

This volume sets out a new paradigm that increases our understanding of African culture and the forces that led to its transformation during the period of the Atlantic slave trade and beyond, putting long due emphasis on the importance of Central African culture to the cultures of the United States, Brazil, and the Caribbean. Focusing on the Kongo/Angola culture zone, the book illustrates how African peoples re-shaped their cultural institutions as they interacted with Portuguese slave traders up to 1800, then follows Central Africans through all the regions where they were taken as slaves and captives.

Njinga of Angola: Africa’s Warrior Queen: Linda M. Heywood

“The fascinating story of arguably the greatest queen in sub-Saharan African history, who surely deserves a place in the pantheon of revolutionary world leaders.”
―Henry Louis Gates, Jr.

Though largely unknown in the West, the seventeenth-century African queen Njinga was one of the most multifaceted rulers in history, a woman who rivaled Queen Elizabeth I in political cunning and military prowess. In this landmark book, based on nine years of research and drawing from missionary accounts, letters, and colonial records, Linda Heywood reveals how this legendary queen skillfully navigated―and ultimately transcended―the ruthless, male-dominated power struggles of her time.

“Queen Njinga of Angola has long been among the many heroes whom black diasporians have used to construct a pantheon and a usable past. Linda Heywood gives us a different Njinga―one brimming with all the qualities that made her the stuff of legend but also full of all the interests and inclinations that made her human. A thorough, serious, and long overdue study of a fascinating ruler, Njinga of Angola is an essential addition to the study of the black Atlantic world.”
―Ta-Nehisi Coates

“This fine biography attempts to reconcile her political acumen with the human sacrifices, infanticide, and slave trading by which she consolidated and projected power.”
New Yorker

“Queen Njinga was by far the most successful of African rulers in resisting Portuguese colonialism… Tactically pious and unhesitatingly murderous…a commanding figure in velvet slippers and elephant hair ripe for big-screen treatment; and surely, as our social media age puts it, one badass woman.”
―Karen Shook, Times Higher Education

Central Africans, Atlantic Creoles, and the Foundation of the Americas, 1585-1660: Linda M. Heywood, John K. Thornton

This book shows that the first generation of Africans taken to English and Dutch colonies before 1660 were captured by pirates from these countries from slave ships coming from Kongo and Angola. This region had embraced Christianity and elements of Western culture, such as names and some material culture, the result of a long period of diplomatic, political, and military interaction with the Portuguese. This background gave them an important role in shaping the way slavery, racism, and African-American culture would develop in English and Dutch colonies throughout the Western Hemisphere.

See related:

https://www.bu.edu/history/files/2011/03/news_oct07.pdf

Is the world ignoring Syria’s war? | Inside Story

Published on Jul 27, 2019
The United Nations says the world is ignoring the bloodsheld in Syria as President Bashar Al Assad steps up the campaign to take back the rebels’ last stronghold. Government fighters backed by Russia began the offensive on Idlib province in April. At least 450 civilians have died since then, with 103 killed in the past 10 days. But the UN says the international community is not paying attention to the mounting death toll. Have we become indifferent to the eight-year conflict?

Presenter: Martine Dennis

Guests: Marwan Kabalan – Head of Policy Analysis at the Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies Nour Hallak – Syrian civil society activist Yahya Al Aridi – Syrian opposition representative