Daily Archives: July 12, 2019

Louisiana braces for epic flooding from Tropical Storm Barry

CNN

Published on Jul 12, 2019

Tropical Storm Barry presents New Orleans with an unprecedented problem, according to the National Weather Service. The Mississippi River, which is usually at 6 to 8 feet in midsummer in the Big Easy, is now at 16 feet, owing to record flooding that’s taken place this year all along the waterway. In the meantime, Barry is spinning away in the Gulf of Mexico, threatening a storm surge of 2 to 3 feet at the mouth of the river, said Jeffrey Graschel, a hydrologist with the weather service’s Lower Mississippi River Forecast Center in Slidell, Louisiana. The unusual confluence of factors adds up to a forecast that has the river cresting Saturday at 19 feet, a level not seen since February 1950 and about 2.3 feet shy of the record set in April 1922, the weather service said Thursday. “Look, there are three ways that Louisiana floods: storm surge, high rivers and rain,” Gov. John Bel Edwards said Thursday. “We’re going to have all three.” States of emergency have been declared in Orleans, Jefferson, St. Bernard, Plaquemines and St. Charles parishes. Jefferson Parish and Plaquemines Parish have instituted mandatory evacuations as a precaution in low-lying areas or those outside major levees.

Tropical Storm Barry: New Orleans Braces for Possible Hurricane, Floods | NBC New York

NBC New York

Published on Jul 12, 2019

Building toward hurricane strength, Tropical Storm Barry began hitting Louisiana with wind and rain Friday as it closed in for what could be a long, slow — and epic — drenching that could trigger flooding in and around New Orleans. With the storm expected to blow ashore by early Saturday as the first hurricane of the season, National Guard troops and rescue crews were posted around the state with boats, high-water vehicles and helicopters. Drinking water was lined up. Utility repair crews with bucket trucks moved into position in the region. And homeowners sandbagged their property or packed up and left. “This is happening. … Your preparedness window is shrinking,” National Hurricane Center Director Ken Graham warned. He added: “It’s powerful. It’s strengthening. And water is going to be a big issue.” Forecasters said Barry could unload 10 to 20 inches (25 to 50 centimeters) of rain through Sunday across a swath of Louisiana that includes New Orleans and Baton Rouge as well as southwestern Mississippi, with pockets in Louisiana getting 25 inches (63 centimeters). Some low-lying roads near the coast were already covered with water Friday morning as the tide rose and the storm pushed water in from the Gulf of Mexico.

Louisiana braces for Tropical Storm Barry

CBS News

Published on Jul 12, 2019

Thousands of Louisiana residents have been ordered to evacuate their homes as Tropical Storm Barry approaches the Gulf Coast. CBS News weather producer David Parkinson has the forecast for the area.

About SAFN | FoodAnthropology

https://foodanthro.com/about-safn/

Home Page: https://foodanthro.com/

Overview

The Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition (SAFN), formerly known as the Council on Nutritional Anthropology (CNA), was organized in 1974 in response to the increased interest in the interface between social sciences and human nutrition. SAFN has the following objectives:

  • To encourage research and exchange of ideas, theories, methods and scientific information relevant to understanding the socio-cultural, behavioral and political-economic factors related to food and nutrition;
  • To provide a forum for communication and interaction among scientists sharing these interests and with other appropriate organizations;
  • To promote practical collaboration among social and nutritional scientists at the fields and program levels.

Current Officers

David Beriss
President
University of New Orleans
Anthropology and Sociology
dberiss@uno.edu

Joan Gross
President-Elect
Oregon State University
Anthropology
jgross@oregonstate.edu 

Rachel E. Black (interim)
SAFN Treasurer
Connecticut College
Anthropology
reblack@gmail.com
www.rachelblack.ca

Kelly Alexander
Student Representative
Duke University
Anthropology
kellyalexander9@hotmail.com

Committees

Nominations

David Sutton, Anthropology, Southern Illinois University, dsutton@siu.edu

Meetings and Program

Jennifer Jo Thompson, Crop and Soil Sciences, University of Georgia, jjthomp@uga.edu

Daniel Shattuck, Anthropology, University of New Mexico, dgshattuck@gmail.com

Ashley Stinnett, Folk Studies and Anthropology, Western Kentucky University, ashley.stinnett@wku.edu

Hilary King, Development Practice, Emory University, hbking@emory.edu

FoodAnthro Web site editors

Amy B. TrubekNutrition and Food Science Department, University of Vermont, atrubek@uvm.edu

Abigail Adams, Anthropology, Central Connecticut State University, adams@ccsu.edu

Anthropology News SAFN Section Editors

Amanda Green, Environmental Studies, Davidson College, amagreen@gmail.com

Kelly Alexander, Anthropology, Duke University, kellyalexander9@hotmail.com

Awards 

Ryan Adams, Sociology and Anthropology, Lycoming College, adamsr@lycoming.edu

Joan Gross, Anthropology, Oregon State University, jgross@oregonstate.edu 

Amanda Green, Environmental Studies, Davidson College, amagreen@gmail.com

2004 Name Change

To more fully engage the spectrum of theoretical and methodological perspectives of individuals AAA-wide, at the 2003 meetings a motion was made by the then CNA Executive Board to put a name change to a vote by its membership during the spring 2004 AAA Elections. The ballot question was passed and changed the organization’s name from ‘Council on Nutritional Anthropology’ (CNA) to ‘Society for the Anthropology of Food and Nutrition’ (SAFN).

 

Review: Organic Food, Farming and Culture | FoodAnthropology

Review: Organic Food, Farming and Culture

Chrzan, Janet and Jacqueline A. Ricotta, eds. Organic Food, Farming and Culture. An Introduction. Bloomsbury Academic. 2019. 332 pp. ISBN 1350027839, 9781350027831

Ellen Messer, Ph.D. (Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University, and Boston University Program in Gastronomy)

On a recent walk through the Portland (Maine) lower port area, I happened upon a burger joint announcing its 100 percent organic grass-fed beef, ground and shaped into a patty that was broiled and served with any other number of “value added” ingredients. The place was relatively empty on this not yet high tourist season day and pre-dinner hour, so I initiated a conversation with the young man taking the orders. “What’s the simplest burger you have?” I asked. The answer was that the default option was with cheese and one sauce + relishes. If I wanted just a plain burger, I would have to specify “no cheese”.

“What about the sauces and toppings—are they all organic?” I asked. He honestly didn’t know. Were the buns organic? Someone else would have to check. From the consumer’s value-driven perspective, such limitations on the boundaries of organic foodstuffs are confusing, not to say, troubling, as concerned, values/ideology-driven eaters try to negotiate dietary intakes that are healthy, respectful of the environment, and caring regarding biological food sources; kind and committed to labor and justice issues, and also wary of contributing to local or larger world food and hunger problems. Local food and sustainable farming advocates, additionally, emphasize the dangers of transferring one’s nutritional loyalties and food dollars to non-local, transnational food corporations that access their ingredients or processed foods wherever they are cheapest and for whatever reasons, never mind injustice to labor or damages to the environment, so long as they don’t enter into the profit-accounting assessment.

These are the conundrums and issues that Organic Food, Farming and Culture. An Introduction. edited by Janet Chrzan (and anthropologist) and Jacqueline A. Ricotta (a professor of horticulture) seek to clarify. The reasonably well-organized volume deliberately begins with some history of organics and ends with an essay contrasting GMOs and organics. Sandwiched in between are short profile pieces by organic farmers, chefs, and consumers, juxtaposed with scholarly essays by academics, policy-makers, industry leaders, cooks or chefs, and other users.

Part One provides multiple “History” entries that succinctly explore the origins of organic food science and technology practices and the organic food movement in the US, Europe, and other places. Gene Anderson’s lyrical chapter on traditional foods as organic foods, with special attention to Chinese and Mexican food systems that are his main areas of ethnographic research, will serve admirably as a classroom basis for understanding the particulars of these histories, and could also be used to encourage students to write their own comparative chapters, based on other world places Anderson has not treated.

Part Two examines “Organics in Practice,” with separate chapters considering agronomics, markets and evolving monitoring standards all along the supply chain. The two-part “Consumers, Citizens, and the Participatory Processes on Organic Food: Two Case Studies from Denmark” compare and contrast bottom-up municipal organic food efforts with top-down Copenhagen government organic efforts and are well worth reading in any course dealing with comparative food-policy (or other policy), government-community relationships, and networking.

Part Three considers “Organic Food Values, Sustainability and Social Movements” reviews and updates evidence on the “Farming for Food or Farming for Profits” controversy. Simply stated: how can and do organic farmers manage to make a living, which starts with gaining access to land and then matching production to effective demand. Syntheses of the demonstrably incomplete and variably framed scientific evidence tying organic foods to (as yet unproven) superior nutrition and health benefits, or the additional controversy surrounding whether organic food-production has the capacity to feed the world, allow readers to access the evidence and draw their own conclusions. Particularly the organic food and “food security” issues suggest good research or exam questions on whether the evidence supports the “yes” or “no it can’t” point of view, and also what additional studies are necessary to move this debate forward.

The final section Four continues the examination of user understandings when choosing organic over non-organic or unmarked foods and “organic food culture,” that encourages eaters to associate with others who favor eating organic as a cultural identity. Here, chefs and academics together raise the usually contentious question— “Is there Really a Difference Between Conventional, Organic, and GMO?”. Here the authors agree in principle and practice with Food Politics blogger Marion Nestle, who advises: Much depends on which foods, which measurements, and which values make a difference. In their concluding chapter, authors Anderson, Chrzan, and Ricotta summarize the plethora of values and challenges facing food producers, processors, purveyors, and consumers in their multiple value-laden choices to eat healthy, environmentally sustainable, socially just, affordable, palatable, and culturally appropriate food. Take-aways, not surprisingly, are that people do not always act on their stated values; also, that chefs and consumers probably care more about the trusted relationship with the farmer who assures them that the produce they buy is farmed organically, and less about official (USDA) certification. Overall, it “takes a community” and reliable partners all along the food value chain to keep organic production viable and attract new entrants. From beginning to end, this book provides numerous examples of such growing relationships (multiple entendres intended), and encourages readers to seek and share more profiles and vignettes from their personal experiences. Unfortunately, readers like me will likely complete the historical, operational, social-organizing, and concluding chapters with no clearer answer to the question whether organic food can feed the world? I have never been convinced by conventional and GMO proponents that it could not, but most pro-organic examples, including those here, lead or leave me to wonder about the limits to livelihoods, dedicated labor and enterprise for most organic practitioners, however passionate.

…(read more).

See related

Food-matters,

China sanctions US over Taiwan arms deal – Ben Swann

RT America

Published on Jul 12, 2019

China announced today that it plans to impose sanctions on US companies after the US Department of State approved a $2.2 billion dollar arms sale to Taiwan. Chinese officials say they’re making moves to safeguard their national interests.

The Genetic Revolution


WGBHForum
Published on Jul 12, 2019

Innovation Hub’s Kara Miller and Marketplace Tech’s Molly Wood lead a fascinating conversation about the genetics revolution: how it’s helping to create breakthrough medicines, why it’s raising privacy concerns, and how the cost of research is impacting drug prices. This event’s panel of experts include Katrine Bosley, a biotech entrepreneur and former President and CEO of Editas Medicine, Safi Bahcall, co-founder and former President and CEO of Synta Pharmaceuticals, Joep Muijrers, Ph.D in Molecular Biology, Chief Financial Officer at the Venture Capital Firm PureTech Health and Barry Werth, author of The Antidote and The Billion-Dollar Molecule for an in-depth conversation. WGBH Forum Network ~ Free online lectures: Explore a world of ideas