Daily Archives: July 9, 2019

Why Asia is the center of the world (again) | Parag Khanna | TEDxGateway

TEDx Talks

Published on Jan 25, 2019

Asians don’t think of themselves as Asian, but as the new Silk Roads re-emerge and propel Asia to the center of the world economy, Asians are rediscovering their greatness and forging a new Asian identity for the 21st century. Parag Khanna was born in India grew up in the UAE, USA, and Germany, and in recent years has lived in London and Singapore. He is an adventure traveler, scholar, and bestselling author of six books including The Second World, Connectography, and The Future is Asian. Parag is the founder and managing partner of FutureMap, a strategic advisory firm. He has appeared in major television and print media around the world, and has spoken at TED Global 2009, TED 2016, TEDxGateway, and other TED events.

China’s rise: The three key things everyone needs to know | Kerry Brown | TEDxThessaloniki

TEDx Talks

Published on Jun 26, 2019
There is more to China than it’s current prominence in global affairs. In this enlightening talk, Kerry Brown reflects on China’s rise and invites us to question our understanding of the country, its people and its values. How did China transform within a few decades to the global powerhouse it is today and what does a future with China in the steering wheel hold for the rest of the world?

Η άνοδος της Κίνας: Τα τρία πράγματα που πρέπει να ξέρουν όλοι

Η Κίνα έχει σήμερα κυρίαρχη θέση στην παγκόσμια γεωπολιτική σκακιέρα. Σ’αυτήν τη διαφωτιστική ομιλία, ο Kerry Brown αναφέρεται στην άνοδο της Κίνας και μας καλεί να εντρυφήσουμε στη χώρα, την ιστορία και τους ανθρώπους της. Πώς μεταμορφώθηκε η Κίνα στην υπερδύναμη που βλέπουμε σήμερα και τι σημαίνει για όλους μας ένα μέλλον με την Κίνα στο τιμόνι της ανθρωπότητας;

Music by audionautix.com

Kerry Brown is Professor of Chinese Studies and Director of the Lau China Institute at King’s College, London. He is an Associate of the Asia Pacific Programme at Chatham House, London.
From 2012 to 2015, he was Professor of Chinese Politics and Director of the China Studies Centre at the University of Sydney, Australia. From 2006 to 2012, he worked at Chatham House as Senior Fellow and then Head of the Asia Programme. From 1998 to 2005, he worked at the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office, as First Secretary at the British Embassy in Beijing, and then as Head of the Indonesia, Philippines and East Timor Section. He lived in the Inner Mongolia region of China from 1994 to 1996. He holds an MA from Cambridge, and a PhD in Chinese politics and language from Leeds University.
Professor Brown has directed the Europe China Research and Advice Network. He is the author of almost 20 books on modern Chinese politics, history and language. This talk was given at a TEDx event using the TED conference format but independently organized by a local community. Learn more at https://www.ted.com/tedx

My Seditious Heart: Collected Nonfiction: Arundhati Roy

Twenty years, a thousand pages, and now a single beautiful edition of Arundhati Roy’s complete nonfiction.

Bookended by her two extraordinary novels, The God of Small Things (1997) and The Ministry of Utmost Happiness (2017), My Seditious Heart collects the work of a two-decade period when Arundhati Roy devoted herself to the political essay as a way of opening up space for justice, rights, and freedoms in an increasingly hostile environment.

Radical and superbly readable, the essays speak in a voice of unique spirit, marked by compassion, clarity, and courage. Roy offers a powerful defense of the collective, of the individual, and of the land, in the face of the destructive logic of financial, social, religious, military, and governmental elites.

In constant conversation with the themes and settings of her novels, the essays form a near-unbroken memoir of Arundhati Roy’s journey as both a writer and a citizen, of both India and the world, from “The End of Imagination,” which begins this book, to “My Seditious Heart,” with which it ends.

Arundhati Roy studied architecture in New Delhi, where she now lives. She is the author of the novels The God of Small Things, for which she received the 1997 Booker Prize, and The Ministry of Utmost Happiness.

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism: Robin DiAngelo, Michael Eric Dyson

The New York Times best-selling book exploring the counterproductive reactions white people have when their assumptions about race are challenged, and how these reactions maintain racial inequality.

In this “vital, necessary, and beautiful book” (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and “allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to ‘bad people’ (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.

An Imaginary Racism: Islamophobia and Guilt: Pascal Bruckner

‘Islamophobia’ is a term that has existed since the nineteenth century. But in recent decades, argues Pascal Bruckner in his controversial new book, it has become a weapon used to silence criticism of Islam. The term allows those who brandish it in the name of Islam to ‘freeze’ the latter, making reform difficult. Whereas Christianity and Judaism have been rejuvenated over the centuries by external criticism, Islam has been shielded from critical examination and has remained impervious to change. This tendency is exacerbated by the hypocrisy of those Western defenders of Islam who, in the name of the principles of the Enlightenment, seek to muzzle its critics while at the same time demanding the right to chastise and criticize other religions. These developments, argues Bruckner, are counter-productive for Western democracies as they struggle with the twin challenges of immigration and terrorism. The return of religion in those democracies must not be equated with the defence of fanaticism, and the right to religious freedom must go hand in hand with freedom of expression, an openness to criticism, and a rejection of all forms of extremism.

There are already more than enough forms of racism; there is no need to imagine more. While all violence directed against Muslims is to be strongly condemned and punished, defining these acts as ‘Islamophobic’ rather than criminal does more to damage Islam and weaken the position of Muslims than to strengthen them.

The Political Economy of Inequality: Frank Stilwell

During the last few decades, the gap between the incomes, wealth and living standards of rich and poor people has increased in most countries. Economic inequality has become a defining issue of our age.

In this book, leading political economist Frank Stilwell provides a comprehensive overview of the nature, causes, and consequences of this growing divide. He shows how we can understand inequalities of wealth and incomes, globally and nationally, examines the scale of the problem and explains how it affects our wellbeing. He also shows that, although governments are often committed to ‘growth at all costs’ and ‘trickle down’ economics, there are alternative public policies that could be used to narrow the gap between rich and poor.

Stilwell’s engaging and clear guide to the issues will be indispensable reading for all students, general readers and scholars interested in inequality in political economy, economics, public policy and beyond.

Ecomodernism: Technology, Politics and The Climate Crisis: Jonathan Symons

Is climate catastrophe inevitable? In a world of extreme inequality, rising nationalism and mounting carbon emissions, the future looks gloomy. Yet one group of environmentalists, the ‘ecomodernists’, are optimistic. They argue that technological innovation and universal human development hold the keys to an ecologically vibrant future. However, this perspective, which advocates fighting climate change with all available technologies – including nuclear power, synthetic biology and others not yet invented – is deeply controversial because it rejects the Green movement’s calls for greater harmony with nature.

In this book, Jonathan Symons offers a qualified defence of the ecomodernist vision. Ecomodernism, he explains, is neither as radical or reactionary as its critics claim, but belongs in the social democratic tradition, promoting a third way between laissez-faire and anti-capitalism. Critiquing and extending ecomodernist ideas, Symons argues that states should defend against climate threats through transformative investments in technological innovation. A good Anthropocene is still possible – but only if we double down on science and humanism to push beyond the limits to growth.