Daily Archives: June 18, 2019

The International Labor Organization Today: Social Justice versus ‘Total Market’ (2/2)

Published on Jun 18, 2019
To mark the 100 year centenary of International Labor Organization and the 75 year anniversary of the Declaration of Philadelphia, TRNN present the full length original footage of Alain Supiot’s 2010 ILO Public Lecture, The Declaration of Philadelphia Today: Social justice versus total market.(Presentation in French; English translation provided in full length transcript)

US hacks Russian power grid – report

Published on Jun 17, 2019
Reports of Russia’s attempts to hack the US power grid had been debunked. In fact, it’s the US that has deployed “American computer code” into Russian power grid systems, the New York Times reports. Investigative journalist Ben Swann joins In Question to unpack this development.

All of the Mueller report’s major findings in less than 30 minutes

Published on Jun 17, 2019
When special counsel Robert Mueller broke his silence in May, his main point was that his long-awaited report spoke for itself. But the report is 448 pages long. So Lisa Desjardins and William Brangham decided to dig into what the findings say – and what they don’t. Here, in less than 30 minutes, are all of the most important points from the Mueller report.

Greenland record melting

Pompeo: Trump doesn’t want war with Iran

Published on Jun 18, 2019
On a visit to the U.S. Central Command in Florida, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo says President Donald Trump does not want war and is only seeking to re-establish a deterrent to Iranian threats. (June 18)

Julian Assange Indictment “Criminalizes the News Gathering Process,” Says Pentagon Papers La wyer

Published on Jun 18, 2019
A London judge has ordered WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange to appear before a court in February 2020 to face a full extradition hearing. Prosecutors in the U.S. have indicted Assange on 18 counts, including 17 violations of the Espionage Act. This is the first-ever case of a journalist or publisher being indicted under the World War I-era law. Assange said that his life was “effectively at stake” if the U.K. honors a U.S. request for his extradition. Assange is currently serving a 50-week sentence in London’s Belmarsh Prison for skipping bail in 2012. We speak with James Goodale, former general counsel of The New York Times. In 1971, he urged the paper to publish the Pentagon Papers, which had been leaked by whistleblower Daniel Ellsberg.

What if all humanity had to do to save itself was listen? | Dustin Yellin

Published on Jun 18, 2019
By working together, and learning from one another, we can build better systems.

– Many of the things that we experience, are our imagination manifesting into this physical realm, avers artist Dustin Yellin.

– People need to completely rethink the way they work together, and learn from one another, so that we can build better systems. If not, things may get “really dark” soon.

– The first step to enabling cooperation is figuring out where the common ground is. Through this method, despite contrary beliefs, we may be able to find some degree of peace.

Dustin Yellin is an artist who lives in Brooklyn, New York, and is the founder and director of Pioneer Works, a multidisciplinary cultural center in Red Hook, Brooklyn that builds community through the arts and sciences to create an open and inspired world.

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What does China want? | The Economist

Published on Aug 27, 2014
An animated infographic depicting China’s territorial disputes. Is China trying to expand its territory?

Click here to subscribe to The Economist on YouTube: http://econ.trib.al/rWl91R7

ONE reason China’s spectacular rise sometimes alarms its neighbours is that it is not a status quo power. From its inland, western borders to its eastern and southern seaboard, it claims territory it does not control.

In the west, China’s border dispute with India is more than a minor cartographic tiff. China claims an area of India that is three times the size of Switzerland, the state of Arunachal Pradesh.

Further west, China occupies Indian claimed territory next to Ladakh in Kashmir, an area called the Aksai Chin. China humiliated India in a brief, bloody war over the dispute in 1962. Since 1988, the two countries have put the dispute on the backburner and got on with developing commercial ties, despite occasional flare-ups.

More immediately dangerous is the stand-off between China and Japan over disputed islands in the East China Sea, known as the Senkakus in Japan and Diaoyu in Chinese.

Japan says they have always been its territory and admits no dispute, claiming also that China only started expressing an interest when it began to seem the area might be rich in oil and gas.

A new and much more dangerous phase of the dispute began in 2012 after Japan’s government nationalised three of the islands by buying them from their private owner.

China accused Japan of breaking an understanding not to change the islands’ status. Ever since, it has been challenging not just Japan’s claim to sovereignty over the islands, but its claim to control them, sending Chinese ships and planes to patrol them.

Raising the stakes is Japan’s alliance with America, which says that though it takes no position on who owns the islands, they are covered by its defence treaty with Japan, since it administers them.

Especially provocative to America and Japan was China’s unilateral announcement in November 2013 of an Air-defence Identification Zone, covering the islands.

The worry is less that big powers will deliberately go to war over these desolate little rocks, but that an accidental collision at sea or in the air might escalate unforeseeably.

Similar fears cloud disputes in the South China Sea, where the maritime claims in South-East Asia are even more complex, and, again, competition is made more intense by speculation about vast potential wealth in hydrocarbon resources.

Vietnam was incensed in May 2014 when China moved a massive oil-rig to drill for two months in what it claimed as its waters.

This was near the Paracel Islands, controlled by China since it evicted the former South Vietnamese from them in 1974.

To the south, China and Vietnam also claim the Spratly archipelago, as does Taiwan, whose claim in the sea mirrors China’s. But the Philippines also has a substantial claim. Malaysia and even tiny Brunei also have an interest.

But it is with Vietnam and the Philippines that China’s disputes are most active. The Philippines accuses China of salami-slicing tactics, stealthily expanding its presence in disputed waters. In 1995 it evicted the Philippines from Mischief Reef, and in 2012 from Scarborough Shoal.

This year it has tried to stop the Philippines from resupplying a small garrison it maintains on the Second Thomas Shoal, and appears to be building an airstrip on the Johnson South Reef.

The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea—UNCLOS—is one forum for tackling these disputes. But UNCLOS cannot rule over territorial disputes, just over the waters habitable islands are entitled to.

And China and Taiwan point to a map published in the 1940s, showing a big U-shaped nine-dashed line around the edge of the sea. That, they say, is historically all China’s. This has no basis in international law, and the Philippines, to China’s fury, is challenging it at an UNCLOS tribunal.

In fact China often fails to clarify whether its claims are based on the nine-dashed line, or on claims to islands, rocks and shoals.

That lack of clarity alarms not just its neighbours and rival claimants, but the United States, which says it has its own national interest in the freedom of navigation in a sea through which a huge chunk of global trade passes

Also alarming is that if these arguments over tiny specks in the sea become so unmanageable, what hope is there for resolving the really big issues? And the biggest of all is the status of Taiwan, still seen by China as part of its territory, but in practice independent since 1949.

For now, Taiwan and China have a thriving commercial relationship. But polls suggest that few in Taiwan hanker after unification with the mainland. And China’s rulers still insist that one day they will have to accept just that.

What is the Belt and Road initiative? | CNBC Explains

Published on Feb 21, 2019
The Belt and Road initiative is China’s foreign policy initiative, but what do we know about this giant plan so far? CNBC’s Xin En Lee finds out how the plan is developing.

China’s trillion dollar plan to dominate global trade

Published on Apr 5, 2018
It’s about more than just economics.

Help us make more ambitious videos by joining the Vox Video Lab. It gets you exclusive perks, like livestream Q&As with all the Vox creators, a badge that levels up over time, and video extras bringing you closer to our work!

China’s Belt and Road Initiative is the most ambitious infrastructure project in modern history. It spans over 60 countries and will cost over a trillion dollars. The plan is to make it easier for the world to trade with China, by funding roads, railways, pipelines, and other infrastructure projects in Asia and Africa. China is loaning trillions of dollars to any country that’s willing to participate and it’s been a big hit with the less democratic countries in the region.

This makes the BRI a risky plan as well. But China is pushing forward because its goals are not strictly economic, they’re also geopolitical.

To truly understand the international conflicts and trends shaping our world you need a big-picture view. Video journalist Sam Ellis uses maps to tell these stories and chart their effects on foreign policy.

Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what’s really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com.