Rats, Lice and History – Hans Zinsser

When “Rats, Lice and History” appeared in 1935, Hans Zinsser (1878-1940) was a highly regarded Harvard biologist who had never written about historical events. Although he had published under a pseudonym, virtually all of his previous writings had dealt with infections and immunity and had appeared either in medical and scientific journals or in book format. He isolated the bacterium that causes the European type of typhus, developed the first anti-typhus vaccine, and, with colleagues, found a way to mass-produce the vaccine. This book recounts the effects of typhus on humankind written by the man who discovered a vaccine for typhus. Asserts that disease had destroyed more civilizations than war and documents mankind’s efforts to eradicate disease. In continuous print since 1935.

This copy comes from the 1st printing as “A Bantam Pathfinder Edition,” by which Bantam publishers denote this title as a culturally significant work. This copy was a privately owned mass-market paperback. Cover is complete with creases from poor storage in covers and reading crease in spine. Names signed by two prior owners on ffep, pages darkening with age. Interior is tight, clean and otherwise unmarked. Copyright 1934,1935. Published by arrangement with Little, Brown & Company, Inc. Indicated that this Bantam Pathfinder Edition of May, 1965 is the 5th edition published and this copy from the 1st printing of that edition. Bantam catalog: SP116. No ISBN or LCCN. MSR = $0.75.

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Hans Zinsser (1878-1940) was a highly regarded Harvard biologist.

 

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