Daily Archives: May 3, 2019

In Historic First, U.K. Parliament Declares a Climate Emergency

May 02, 2019

And in Britain, the House of Commons Wednesday became the first parliament in the world to declare a climate emergency. This is Labour Party Leader Jeremy Corbyn.

Jeremy Corbyn: “We have no time to waste. We are living in a climate crisis that will spiral dangerously out of control unless we take rapid and dramatic action now. This is no longer about a distant future. We’re talking about nothing less than the irreversible destruction of the environment within our lifetimes of members of this house.”

Wednesday’s resolution is largely symbolic. It comes on the heels of April’s Extinction Rebellion uprising in London that saw police arrest more than 1,000 protesters, many of whom superglued themselves to buildings, trains and sidewalks in a nonviolent direct action campaign.

100 Million in India and Bangladesh in Path of Worst Indian Ocean Cyclone in Five Years

May 02, 2019

In the Indian Ocean, Cyclone Fani has strengthened into the worst tropical storm to threaten India and Bangladesh in at least five years. The cyclone is packing winds of about 120 miles per hour, making it the equivalent of a Category 3 hurricane. About 100 million people are in the path of the storm.

The ‘Badge of Honor’ of COP24


UPFSI
Published on May 2, 2019

The COP24 in 2018 in Katovice, Poland, saw Greta Thunberg – then youth climate activist, soon to become global climate movement leader – rise to world fame. In this video, Stuart Scott explains his part of the story of how that all came about. Stuart is interviewed here by Dave Gardner, host of the GrowthBusters podcast (http://www.growthbusters.org/podcast). Their full conversation will be published soon as an episode of the podcast.

Foods of the Future – Great Tasting and Healthy Foods for a Low Carbon World

Food-matters,

The Reconquest (Reconquista) of Iberian Peninsula

The History of Sardinia and Italy: Every Year

South Africa is Bracing for an Electoral Storm Over the Climate Crisis (2/2)

Amsterdam: A History of the World’s Most Liberal City: Russell Shorto

An endlessly entertaining portrait of the city of Amsterdam and the ideas that make it unique, by the author of the acclaimed Island at the Center of the World

Tourists know Amsterdam as a picturesque city of low-slung brick houses lining tidy canals; student travelers know it for its legal brothels and hash bars; art lovers know it for Rembrandt’s glorious portraits.

But the deeper history of Amsterdam, what makes it one of the most fascinating places on earth, is bound up in its unique geography-the constant battle of its citizens to keep the sea at bay and the democratic philosophy that this enduring struggle fostered. Amsterdam is the font of liberalism, in both its senses. Tolerance for free thinking and free love make it a place where, in the words of one of its mayors, “craziness is a value.” But the city also fostered the deeper meaning of liberalism, one that profoundly influenced America: political and economic freedom. Amsterdam was home not only to religious dissidents and radical thinkers but to the world’s first great global corporation.

In this effortlessly erudite account, Russell Shorto traces the idiosyncratic evolution of Amsterdam, showing how such disparate elements as herring anatomy, naked Anabaptists parading through the streets, and an intimate gathering in a sixteenth-century wine-tasting room had a profound effect on Dutch-and world-history. Weaving in his own experiences of his adopted home, Shorto provides an ever-surprising, intellectually engaging story of Amsterdam.

The Island at the Center of the World: The Epic Story of Dutch Manhattan and the Forgotten Colony That Shaped America: Russell Shorto

In a riveting, groundbreaking narrative, Russell Shorto tells the story of New Netherland, the Dutch colony which pre-dated the Pilgrims and established ideals of tolerance and individual rights that shaped American history.

“Astonishing . . . A book that will permanently alter the way we regard our collective past.” –The New York Times

When the British wrested New Amsterdam from the Dutch in 1664, the truth about its thriving, polyglot society began to disappear into myths about an island purchased for 24 dollars and a cartoonish peg-legged governor. But the story of the Dutch colony of New Netherland was merely lost, not destroyed: 12,000 pages of its records–recently declared a national treasure–are now being translated. Russell Shorto draws on this remarkable archive in The Island at the Center of the World, which has been hailed by The New York Times as “a book that will permanently alter the way we regard our collective past.”

The Dutch colony pre-dated the “original” thirteen colonies, yet it seems strikingly familiar. Its capital was cosmopolitan and multi-ethnic, and its citizens valued free trade, individual rights, and religious freedom. Their champion was a progressive, young lawyer named Adriaen van der Donck, who emerges in these pages as a forgotten American patriot and whose political vision brought him into conflict with Peter Stuyvesant, the autocratic director of the Dutch colony. The struggle between these two strong-willed men laid the foundation for New York City and helped shape American culture. The Island at the Center of the World uncovers a lost world and offers a surprising new perspective on our own.

“We Shall Overcome”: Remembering Folk Icon Pete Seeger on What Would Have Been His 100th Birthday

Democracy Now!

Published on May 3, 2019

It was 100 years ago today that the late folk singer and activist Pete Seeger was born. In 2004, Seeger came into our Firehouse studio for an in-depth interview. We play an excerpt to mark his centennial celebration, in which he recalls how he learned about the classic civil rights anthem “We Shall Overcome,” that he helped to popularize. Watch the full interview and our full archive of interviews with Seeger.