My Brothers Keeper for Negroes – The Renaissance Series

My Brothers Keeper for Negroes – The Renaissance Series

THE RENAISSANCE
Published on Jul 22, 2018

The Negroes before the slave trade(3) Have you ever imagined what the Negroes lives were like prior to the brutal slave trade of between 1434 – 1900? Have you ever tried to imagine how many Negroes were captured and shipped as slaves to the different parts of the world? Have you ever heard about a group called Hebrew Israelites?

Have you ever tried to understudy why they believe that slavery and slave trade was custom made for them? In this video, we tried to examine who it was that captured and sold the Negroes as slaves between 1434 and 1900. We examine the state of the slave trade today and how the slave masters foot soldiers are still murdering and enslaving the Negroes today.

REFERENCES

Buxton, T. F. (1840). The African slave trade and its remedy.
Burns, A.C (1919) The Nigeria handbook containing statistical and general information respecting the colony and protectorate
Alexander, A. (1846). A history of colonization on the western coast of Africa.
CROWTHER, R. S. (1855). Journal of an Expedition Up The Niger and Tshadda Rivers, Undertaken by MacGregor Laird, Esq. in Connection with the British Government, in 1854 with Map and Appendix.
Robinson, C. H. (1897). Hausaland, Or, Fifteen Hundred Miles Through the Central Soudan. S. Low, Marston.
Blake, W. O. (1861). The History of Slavery and the Slave Trade, Ancient and Modern. H. Miller.
Hazzledine, G. D. (1904). The white man in Nigeria. E. Arnold.
Hodgson, W. B. (1844). Notes on Northern Africa, the Sahara and Soudan. Wiley.
Hodgson, W. B. (1843) The Foulahs of Central Africa and the African Slave Trade
Barrow, J. (1799). An account of travels into the interior of southern Africa, in years 1797 and 1798
Shaw, F. L. (1905). Tropical Dependency.
Lugard, L. F. J. (1922). The dual mandate in British tropical Africa
Thomas, W. (1860). Adventures and observations on the West coast of Africa and its islands, historical and descriptive sketches of Madeira, Canry, Biafra and Cape Verd islands: their climates, inhabitants and productions

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