Daily Archives: March 3, 2019

Kunta Kinteh Island and Related Sites (UNESCO/NHK)


UNESCO

Published on Mar 26, 2013

James Island and Related Sites present a testimony to the main periods and facets of the encounter between Africa and Europe along the River Gambia, a continuum stretching from pre-colonial and pre-slavery times to independence. The site is particularly significant for its relation to the beginning of the slave trade and its abolition. It also documents early access to the interior of Africa. Source: UNESCO TV / © NHK Nippon Hoso Kyokai URL: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/761/

Roots trip to Juffureh, Gambia


Alan GrayPublished on May 4, 2016

The Roots Excursion to Kunta Kinteh’s village “Juffureh” and to James Island in The Gambia. April 2016

Gambia’s race to save its ‘Roots’ on Kunta Kinteh island

AFP news agency

Published on Apr 20, 2017

As the rebel slave who defied his captors, Kunta Kinte, immortalised in print and on screen in “Roots”, put The Gambia on the map for historical tourism. But the island where he and other west Africans faced the horrors of being chained, branded and separated before leaving their homeland forever, is under threat from sea erosion and neglect.

Kunta Kinteh island Documentary


Lamin Jatta
Published on May 7, 2013

The final prison cell of Kunte Kimteh before being taken to the americas as a man who was enslaved.

KUNTA KINTEH ISLAND, GAMBIA


HUERTOS DE ESPERANZA
Published on Mar 28, 2017

ISLA DE KUNTA KINTEH EN MEDIO DEL RIO GAMBIA . LUGAR DODE GUARDABAN A LOS ESCLAVOS PARA DESPUES EMBARCARLOS HACIA AMERICA

Kunta Kinteh Island Trailer

KuntaKintehIsland
Published on Jun 26, 2012

Gambia fights to save Kunta Kinteh Island – CNN

https://www.cnn.com/2017/05/03/africa/kunta-kinteh-island/index.html
CNN)The island formerly known as James has a dark history.

This speck of land at the mouth of the Gambia river was once a major waypoint of the transatlantic slave trade. African abductees were brutally imprisoned on the island, ahead of being forcibly transported to the US.

“It was the departure point for hundreds of thousands of blacks captured in the Gambia River area from 1588 to 1807,” says historian Hassoum Ceesay, curator of the Gambia National Museum.

The victims included famous rebel Kunta Kinte, who lost a foot resisting the slavers. His story inspired Alex Haley’s 1976 novel “Roots” and the hit TV series of the same name. His legacy has been kept alive in popular culture by artists such as Kendrick Lamar.

Growing public awareness of Kinte’s story and the horrors of slavery has made the island an attraction for tourists and historians.
In 2003, James Island was certified a UNESCO World Heritage Site as a “unique memorial to the Atlantic Slave Trade.” In 2011, James was renamed Kunta Kinteh Island in commemoration of its most famous son.