Daily Archives: February 8, 2019

The Schomburg Center

The New York Public Library

Published on Sep 29, 2015

In honor of the Schomburg Center’s 90th anniversary year, some of its curators, Junior Scholars, staff, and notable names share what the Schomburg means to them. The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture is one of the world’s leading research facilities devoted to the preservation of materials on the global African and African diasporan experiences. A focal point of Harlem’s cultural life, the Center also functions as the national research library in the field, providing free access to its wide-ranging noncirculating collections. It also sponsors programs and events that illuminate and illustrate the richness of black history and culture. Learn more at nypl.org/locations/schomburg

Zaire Revisited: Congolese nostalgic for era of dictator Mobutu

FRANCE 24 English

Published on Nov 2, 2018

More than 20 years after the fall of the charismatic Congolese dictator Mobutu Sese Seko, who ruled the vast African country with an iron fist from 1965 to 1997, many Congolese look back fondly on the era of “Papa Marshal”, as he was nicknamed. Our reporters went to DR Congo to explore the legacy of the longtime strongman. It’s been 21 years since Marshal Mobutu Sese Seko was ousted as leader of the Democratic Republic of Congo, meaning 21 years since the large African country swapped dictatorship for supposed democracy. And although the country seemed to suffocate under Mobutu’s autocratic regime, many Congolese now look back with nostalgia on the Zaire years, as the country was called at the time. From national pride to roads and electricity, plus a weakening of tribal influence, the successes of the “Marshal” now seem to outweigh his many failings. In the north of DR Congo, not far from the border with the Central African Republic, lies Gbadolite.

This is the location that Mobutu, the “leopard of Zaire”, chose to be the stronghold of his power. Formerly a hamlet of 2,000 souls made up of a few terracotta huts, Gbadolite was transformed in the late 1960s to accommodate the dictator and his entourage. In just a few years, a modern and stylish city emerged in the heart of the rainforest. But one morning of May 1997, the village found itself frozen in time. Driven out by rebels led by Laurent-Désiré Kabila, Mobutu had to flee to Morocco. The Marshal’s extravagant palaces were looted or destroyed. Some buildings under construction were never completed. Our reporters Horaci Garcia Marti and Thomas Nicolon visited the ruins of Gbadolite and then Kinshasa, the bustling Congolese capital, to try to understand what traces Mobutu has left on the landscape and in the wider collective consciousness. By speaking to those who worked with the dictator, plus those who suffered from his autocratic regime, our reporters explore the difficulty of moving on from a dictatorship that lasted for more than three decades.
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Is Germany making Europe dependent on Russia? | DW News

DW News
Published on Feb 8, 2019

Germany’s plans for a pipeline supplying Russian gas have been thrown into doubt. The US ambassador to Berlin has urged Germany to ditch the Nord Stream 2 project. And now France says it could halt the construction process by subjecting the Russian company building it to tougher European Union rules. Critics say the pipeline – due to start pumping later this year – will make Germany dependent on Moscow and undermine European security. That leaves a key part of Germany’s energy strategy under threat.

Gas wars: The problem with Nord Stream 2 – BBC News

BBC News

Published on Feb 8, 2019

Nord Stream 2 is the name of the undersea pipeline that should soon pump more Russian gas into Europe. It is a divisive project within Europe and has infuriated the US, which fears that more Russian gas means more Russian influence and less share of the lucrative European gas market for American liquefied natural gas. BBC’s Berlin correspondent Jenny Hill has been looking at the issue.

U.S. slave ship descendants gather at ‘Africatown’

China’s African Gold Rush | 101 East

Al Jazeera English

Published on Dec 15, 2016

Ghana is one of the world’s poorest countries, yet it is rich in gold. For a decade now, Chinese miners from the region of Shanglin have travelled there to try their luck mining gold. 101 East travels to the middle of the tropical rainforest to meet the Chinese miners and Ghanaian workers trying to escape poverty. But is this gold rush really benefiting the impoverished nation, or is all the money going back to China with the miners – leaving Ghana with an environmental bill to pay?

The price of gold: Chinese mining in Ghana documentary | Guardian Investigations


The Guardian
Published on Apr 24, 2013

Ghana has had a gold rush but here, Afua Hirsch discovers how Chinese immigrants are profiting from industrialising the country’s small-scale mining industry. She sees for herself that, for the many locals who chance losing life and limb for a piece of the same pie, the risks are rarely worth it, and explores where the responsibility for regulating this industry lies. The price of gold: Chinese mining in Ghana documentary

Afua Hirsch reports on Ghana’s gold rush in a film that discovers how Chinese immigrants are profiting from industrialising the country’s small-scale mining industry. She sees for herself that, for the many locals who chance losing life and limb for a piece of the same pie, the risks are rarely worth it, and explores where the responsibility for regulating this industry lies.