Daily Archives: January 17, 2019

A new vision for Harvard’s Houghton Library – Harvard Gazette

Kaitlin Buckley Harvard Library Communications

Date January 14, 2019

Planned renovation will improve research and exhibition facilitiesAn upcoming renovation to Houghton Library will modernize its research and teaching facilities, expand its exhibition galleries, improve physical access to its spaces and holdings, and create a more welcoming, inviting, and accessible environment.

The renovation represents a key component of a larger vision for the rare books library, which celebrated its 75th anniversary last year. It serves as a research center and teaching laboratory for students and faculty across many disciplines that use primary sources, hosting nearly 300 class visits each year and programming a series of exhibitions and events that draw a range of visitors from across Harvard and surrounding communities. To expand its reach vastly, the library’s digitization efforts have placed its collections within reach of researchers around the world.

“We want all of Houghton Library — the collections, the building, and our expert staff — to generate interest in and passion for the humanities, the arts, the social sciences, and more,” said Thomas Hyry, Florence Fearrington Librarian of Houghton Library. “Our efforts to create a more inclusive atmosphere and to increase access to Houghton’s collections and services will ensure the library becomes an even more active and highly valued resource for Harvard and the world at large.”

…(read more).

The Yoke of Bondage: Christianity and African Slavery in the United States | Harvard Library

Through Friday, Mar 15, 2019

Open to the public

Location

Andover-Harvard Theological Library, 2nd floor
Andover-Harvard Theological Library
45 Francis Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
See All Hours

December 5, 2018

Opening December 5, our new exhibit is curated by Freshman Seminar 43D: Christianity and Slavery in America, 1619-1865 taught by Professor Catherine Brekus. On display will be original materials from our Special Collections, as well as reproductions from materials held at other Harvard libraries.

At the reception, 4:30-6:00 on the 2nd floor of the library, the student curators will be on hand to discuss their selections, and the Kuumba Singers of Harvard College will perform, 5:00-5:30.

The exhibit will remain on display until March 15, 2019…

slave-ship2

From Talking to Action: Fostering Deep Collaboration Between University Libraries, Museums, and IT

https://vimeo.com/307424684
Background

From Talking to Action: Fostering Deep Collaboration Between University Libraries, Museums, and IT

Susan Gibbons
Stephen F. Gates ’68 University Librarian; Deputy Provost for Collections & Scholarly Communication
Yale University

Louis King
Enterprise Architect, Information Technology Services
Yale University

Michael Appleby
Head of Information Technology, Yale Center for British Art
Yale University

Dale Hendrickson
Director of Library Information Technology
Yale University

Coalition for Networked Information (CNI)
Fall 2018 Membership Meeting
December 10-11, 2018
Washington, DC
cni.org/mm/fall-2018/

CNI: Coalition for Networked Information
Published on Jan 14, 2019

Published on Jan 14, 2019
From Talking to Action: Fostering Deep Collaboration Between University Libraries, Museums, and IT

Susan Gibbons
Stephen F. Gates ’68 University Librarian; Deputy Provost for Collections & Scholarly Communication
Yale University

Louis King
Enterprise Architect, Information Technology Services
Yale University

Michael Appleby
Head of Information Technology, Yale Center for British Art
Yale University

Dale Hendrickson
Director of Library Information Technology
Yale University

Coalition for Networked Information (CNI)
Fall 2018 Membership Meeting
December 10-11, 2018
Washington, DC
https://www.cni.org/mm/fall-2018/

Trump Nukes Russia Nuke Deal, Putin fires back

Michael Wall discusses space cooperation between China and US agencies

Jeremy Grantham’s $1 Billion Plan to Fight Climate Change – Bloomberg


January 17, 2019, 5:00 AM EST

The veteran money manager will devote $1 billion to helping the world escape catastrophe.
By Ben Steverman

Terrifying an audience is one of Jeremy Grantham’s specialties. The legendary investor, co-founder of Grantham Mayo Van Otterloo (GMO), is famous for predicting doom. And he’s famous for being right, with a remarkable record of spotting investment bubbles before they pop, notably the 2000 tech crash and 2008 financial crisis.

These days, the topic of Grantham’s warnings is not financial markets but the environment. At universities and investor conferences, gardening clubs and local environmental groups, he gives a talk titled “Race of Our Lives”—the one between the Earth’s rapidly warming temperature and the human beings coming up with ways to fight and adapt to climate change.

Green technologies, like batteries and solar and wind power, are improving far faster than many realize, he says. Decarbonizing the economy will be an investing bonanza for those who know it’s coming—“the biggest reshuffling of the economy since the Industrial Revolution.” Despite these gains, people are losing the race: Climate change is also accelerating, with consequences so dire that they’re almost impossible to imagine.

Grantham says he’ll devote 98 percent of his net worth, or about $1 billion, to help humans win the race. Currently he and his wife, Hanne, are giving more than $30 million a year to eight large nonprofits and about 30 smaller ones. Beneficiaries include three academic institutes in the U.K. named after him, at Imperial College London, the London School of Economics, and his alma mater, the University of Sheffield.

“On income inequality, I am left of Karl Marx”

While the donations fund a variety of climate research and policy projects, Grantham focuses his presentations on overpopulation. Forget the flooding of oceanfront cities such as Miami or his adopted hometown of Boston. “Agriculture is in fact the real underlying problem produced by climate change,” he says. With topsoil disappearing at a rate of 1 percent a year and “only 30 to 70 good harvest years left depending on your location,” he says, farmers will struggle to feed the planet. Higher sea levels will inundate the world’s great rice-producing river deltas.

“Even without climate change,” he says, “it would be somewhere between hard and impossible to feed 11.2 billion” people, the United Nations’ median population estimate for 2100. Every other animal species on Earth lives with “recurrent waves of famine,” Grantham says, with population rising and falling based on their food supply. Why not us? He brings up a chart showing the tripling of the world’s population since he was born, more than 80 years ago. “If that’s the curve in the stock market,” he says, “you know what to do: panic and go short.” Translation: When something goes up that far for that long, it’s almost certain to plummet. The only question is when. The next bubble, he seems to be implying, is humans. “The presentation is so severe and raw,” says Morningstar Inc. Chief Marketing Officer Rob Pinkerton, who watched almost 1,300 financial advisers take in Grantham’s keynote speech at the Morningstar Investment Conference in Chicago in May. “It really rattled them.”

Grantham’s discussion of overpopulation makes some people uneasy. “Population is a delicate issue,” says Jonathan Foley, a climate scientist who focuses on agriculture and is executive director of Project Drawdown, a group working on responses to climate change. On the one hand, the decision to have children is “one of the most fundamental of human rights,” he says. “Naturally it’s a sensitive topic to bring up, especially coming from the West.” Still, Foley agrees the issue needs to be discussed. “We can’t pretend there are no limits to the planet,” he says. “You need to address the seriousness of this without triggering people to become fatalistic.”

…(read more).

Rhodes Ahead: Public Leadership Series – SoundCloud

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The Rhodes Ahead podcast brings listeners thought leadership from the Rhodes Scholar Community.

The Rhodes Ahead: Public Leadership Series reflects upon leadership in the 21st century. In particular, it looks at the challenges of ethical leadership, cultural understanding, and communication in today’s fast-moving inter-connected world.

A Short History of Progress: Ronald Wright

Each time history repeats itself, the cost goes up. The twentieth century—a time of unprecedented progress—has produced a tremendous strain on the very elements that comprise life itself: This raises the key question of the twenty-first century: How much longer can this go on?

With wit and erudition, Ronald Wright lays out a-convincing case that history has always provided an answer, whether we care to notice or not. From Neanderthal man to the Sumerians to the Roman Empire, A Short History of Progress dissects the cyclical nature of humanity’s development and demise, the 10,000-year old experiment that we’ve unleashed but have yet to control.

It is Wright’s contention that only by understanding and ultimately breaking from the patterns of progress and disaster that humanity has repeated around the world since the Stone Age can we avoid the onset of a new Dark Age. Wright illustrates how various cultures throughout history have literally manufactured their own end by producing an overabundance of innovation and stripping bare the very elements that allowed them to initially advance. Wright’s book is brilliant; a fascinating rumination on the hubris at the heart of human development and the pitfalls we still may have time to avoid.

The Silence of Animals: On Progress and Other Modern Myths: John Gray

John Gray draws on an extraordinary array of memoirs, poems, fiction and philosophy to make us re-imagine our place in the world. Writers as varied as Ballard, Borges, Freud and Conrad are mesmerised by forms of human extremity – experiences on the outer edge of the possible, or which tip into fantasy and myth. What happens to us when we starve, when we fight, when we are imprisoned? And how do our imaginations leap into worlds way beyond our real experience?

The Silence of Animals is consistently fascinating, filled with unforgettable images and a delight in the conundrum of our existence – an existence which we decorate with countless myths and ideas, where we twist and turn to avoid acknowledging that we too are animals, separated from the others perhaps only by our self-conceit. In the Babel we have created for ourselves, it is the silence of animals that both reproaches and bewitches us.

See:
https://www.vice.com/en_us/article/qbwqem/john-gray-interview-atheism

Protecting Our Way of Life – John Gray


tradarchive
Published on Jul 6, 2017

John Gray assesses what lies behind the Trump phenomenon.