Daily Archives: January 10, 2019

Robert Costanza, Wellbeing Economy needs to be Primary Goal

Climate State
Published on Jan 7, 2019

Robert Costanza (Australian National University), speaks about planetary boundaries and ecological economy at the Club of Rome 50th Anniversary Meeting in Rome, October 2018. Watch the full panel via https://www.facebook.com/clubofrome/v… and https://50thclubofrome.com

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Trump Nominates Ex-Coal Lobbyist Andrew Wheeler as Permanent EPA Head

Jan 10, 2019

President Trump has nominated former coal lobbyist Andrew Wheeler as Environmental Protection Agency administrator. Wheeler is a former coal lobbyist and has been the acting head of the EPA since Scott Pruitt resigned in July amid an onslaught of financial and ethics scandals. Wheeler has regularly engaged with right-wing conspiracy accounts on social media and “liked” a racist post featuring the Obamas in 2013.

China vs U.S. Rising Global Greenhouse Emissions in 2018

Climate State
Published on Jan 10, 2019

A brief outline of CO2 emissions, based on global trends, with a focus on China by Zeke Hausfather (Berkeley) and U.S. CO2 emissions by Trevor Houser (Rhodium Group), as well as an outline on reductions by Drew Shindell about various emissions, including SLCP’s (Short Lived Climate Pollutants). Sources: Global release of greenhouse gases has increased in two consecutive years. University of California Berkeley expert, and Carbon

Brief writer, Zeke Hausfather, has analysis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqvUw…
NPR: U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions Are Once Again On The Rise https://www.npr.org/2019/01/08/683258…
Drew Shindell (Duke University) via https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VnOCD…

From EPA to TSA, Agencies Devoted to Nation’s Health and Safety Are Going Unfunded Dur ing Shutdown

Democracy Now!

Published on Jan 10, 2019

https://democracynow.org – The partial government shutdown has entered its 20th day. On Saturday, it will become the longest shutdown in U.S. history if a deal is not reached. President Trump reportedly stormed out of a meeting with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer Wednesday after they refused to back a deal to fund a wall on the southern border. Schumer accused Trump of throwing a temper tantrum. Trump described the meeting as a “total waste of time.” We speak with Robert Weissman, president of Public Citizen. The group just released a report titled “As Shutdown Drags On, Agencies Devoted to Consumer and Worker Health and Safety Unfunded and Deprioritized.”

Congressman Explains Stupidity Of Trump’s Border Wall

The Atlantic World: A History, 1400 – 1888 : Douglas R. Egerton, Alison Games, Jane G. Landers, Kris Lane, Donald R. Wright

Before the voyage of Columbus in 1492, the Atlantic Ocean stood as a barrier to contact between the people (and their ideas and institutions), plants, animals, and microbes of Eurasia and Africa on the one hand and the Americas on the other.

Following Columbus’s voyage, the Atlantic turned into a conduit for transferring these things among the four continents bordering the ocean in ways that affected people living on each of them.

The appearance of The Atlantic World marks an important achievement, for it stands out as the first successful attempt to combine the many strains of Atlantic history into a comprehensive, thoughtful narrative. At the core of this ground-breaking and eloquently written survey lies a consideration of the relationships among people living in Europe, Africa, and the Americas, with a focus on how these relationships played important roles—often the most important roles—in how the histories of the people involved unfolded. The ways of life of millions of people changed, sometimes for the better but often for the worse, because of their relationship to the larger Atlantic world. And unlike existing texts dealing with one or another aspect of Atlantic history, The Atlantic World does not subjugate the history of Africa and South America to those of the “British Atlantic” or Europe.

With historians and other scholars beginning to reconceptualize the Atlantic World as a dynamic zone of exchange in which people, commodities, and ideas circulated from the mid-fifteenth century until the dawn of the twentieth century, the interconnections between people along the Atlantic rim create a coherent region, one in which events in one corner inevitably altered the course of history in another. As this book testifies, Atlantic history, properly understood, is history without borders—in which national narratives take backstage to the larger examination of interdependence and cultural transmission.

Conceived of and produced by a team of distinguished authors with countless hours of teaching experience at the college level, this thoughtfully organized, beautifully written, and lavishly illustrated book will set the standard for all future surveys intended as a core text for the new and rapidly growing courses in Atlantic History.

Google Books  |  Endnote reference

 

The Oxford Handbook of Slavery in the Americas (Oxford Handbooks): Robert L. Paquette, Mark M. Smith

The Oxford Handbook of Slavery in the Americas offers penetrating, original, and authoritative essays on the history and historiography of the institution of slavery in the New World. With essays on colonial and antebellum America, Brazil, the Caribbean, the Indies, and South America, the Handbook has impressive geographic and temporal coverage. It also includes a generous range of thematic essays on comparative slavery, the economics of slavery, historical methodology in the field, slavery and the law, for instance.

While obviously indebted to the foundational works of the 1960s and 1970s, current writing on the history of slavery and forms of unfree labor in the Americas has taken decidedly original, new, often ingenious turns. A younger generation of scholars has shown a healthy respect for that tradition while posing new, often interdisciplinary, and theoretically informed questions, considering, for example, the nature and definition of slave resistance in the Americas, evolving meanings of gender and race under slavery, the complicated nature of class formation in unfree societies, the elaboration of proslavery and antislavery ideologies, the origins and subsequent elaboration of race-based slavery, and mechanisms of emancipation.

Written by an international team including some of the field’s most eminent historians and the most innovative younger scholars working today, The Oxford Handbook of Slavery in the Americas seeks to explain the enduring importance of the earlier historiography, identify current trends and developments, and offer suggestive but informed commentary on future developments in the field for a global scholarly audience.

Google Books 

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