Daily Archives: October 17, 2018

On brink of ‘worst famine in 100 years’ – BBC News


BBC News

Published on Oct 15, 2018

The United Nations is warning that 13 million people in Yemen are facing starvation. It’s calling on the military coalition, led by Saudi Arabia, to halt air strikes which are killing civilians, and contributing to what the UN says could become “the worst famine in the world in 100 years”. Yemen’s civil war began three years ago, when Houthi rebels, backed by Iran, seized much of the country, including the capital Sanaa. Saudi Arabia, backed by the US, the UK and France, is using air strikes and a blockade – in support of the internationally-recognised government. At least 10,000 people have been killed in the conflict and millions are displaced. Our international correspondent Orla Guerin, producer Nicola Careem and cameraman Lee Durant sent this report from Sanaa. It contains some distressing scenes.

Food-matters

Author Michael Lewis On ‘The Fifth Risk’ Within The Trump Administration


WGBH News
Published on Oct 4, 2018

World Livestock: Transforming the livestock sector through the SDGs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ev6O5T7RKJU
Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations
Published on Oct 17, 2018

This video illustrates the interlinkages between the livestock sector and the SDGs. It introduces a global report published by FAO, which focuses on how the livestock sector contributes directly or indirectly to each of the SDGs. However, there are complex interactions and the achievement of some of the targets will conflict with the accomplishment of others.

Food-matters

Watch This Retired Admiral Destroy Ted Cruz’s Climate Myths


Climate Desk
Published on Dec 8, 2015

Yes on Measure G to Ban Fracking


Food & Water Watch
Published on Oct 16, 2018

Vote YES on Measure G this November 6th to protect our water, land and air by banning new future fossil fuel extraction and preventing fracking in San Luis Obispo County.

Factory Farm Webinar


Food & Water Watch
Published on Oct 17, 2018

Everyone deserves to trust that the food they eat is healthy. Moreover, clean water and a safe and vital environment is paramount to our health and to growing healthy food now and in the future. And for these reasons, as well as social ones, why we must ban factory farms.

Food-matters

Rising Sea Levels Putting New York City at Risk


Wall Street Journal
Published on Dec 30, 2011

If global warming melts the Earth’s ice caps, New York City could be awash in water. WSJ’s Robert Lee Hotz reports how a possible rise in sea levels is putting New York at risk and what engineers are proposing to protect the populous city.

Trump tours Michael’s devastation, questions climate science


PBS NewsHour

Published on Oct 15, 2018

President Trump toured a Gulf Coast ravaged by Hurricane Michael on Monday. The death toll stands at 17, dozens are still missing and thousands are expected to be without power for at least another week. The president promised federal help in rebuilding. But, appearing on “60 Minutes”, he also challenged whether climate change is man-made and asserted it “will change back.” William Brangham reports.

See: Full news report

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Pictures Of The Arctic Sea Ice In 1970 Versus Today And How Melting Sea Ice Affects Our


The Real Truth About Health
Published on Sep 16, 2018

The Arctic may be free of ice for the first time in 10,000 years. Wadhams shows how sea ice is the ‘canary in the mine’ of planetary climate change. He describes how it forms and the vital role it plays in reflecting solar heat back into space and providing an ‘air conditioning’ system for the planet.

Prof. Peter Wadhams is the UK’s most experienced sea ice scientist, with 48 years of research on sea ice and ocean processes in the Arctic and the Antarctic. This has focused on expeditions and measurements in the field, which has involved more than 50 expeditions to both polar regions, working from ice camps, icebreakers, aircraft, and, uniquely, Royal Navy submarines (6 submerged voyages to the North Pole ). His research group in Cambridge has been the only UK group with the capacity to carry out fieldwork on sea ice.

He is Emeritus Professor of Ocean Physics and is the author of numerous publications on dynamics and thermodynamics of sea ice, sea ice thickness, waves in ice, icebergs, ocean convection and kindred topics. The current main topics of research in the group are sea ice properties, dynamics, and distributions in thickness and concentration. He is also a pioneer in the use of AUVs (autonomous underwater vehicles) under sea ice, using multibeam sonar to map bottom features, work which he has also been done from UK nuclear submarines.

He began his research career at the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge University, where he rose to become Director. He moved to DAMTP in 2001. He has also held visiting professorships in Tokyo (National Institute of Polar Research), Monterey (US Naval Postgraduate School), Seattle (University of Washington) and La Jolla (Green Scholar at Scripps Institution of Oceanography).

He was the coordinator of several European Union Arctic flagship projects (ESOP, GreenICE, CONVECTION, and others) and is currently on the Steering Committee of the EU ICE-ARC project as well as a major US Office of Naval Research initiative in the Arctic. He served eight years on the Scientific Committee of the European Environment Agency and had served on panels of the National Academy of Sciences (USA).

In 1990 he received the Italgas Prize for Environmental Sciences, and he has also been awarded the Polar Medal (UK) (1987) and the W.S. Bruce Prize of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. As well as being Professor at Cambridge he is an Associate Professor at the Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche, run by Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, and is a Professor at the Università Politecnica Delle Marche, Ancona. He is a Member of the Finnish Academy and is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.

His most recent book, “A Farewell to Ice”, documents the ways in which the retreat of sea ice in the Arctic generates feedbacks which impact the entire global climate system, accelerating the rate of warming, the rate of sea level rise, the emission of methane from the offshore, and the occurrence of weather extremes affecting food production. He contends that catastrophic consequences cannot be avoided without making an all-out effort to develop ways of directly capturing carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.dioxide out of the atmosphere.

What Are The Consequences Of The Collapse Of The Arctics Summer Ice? by Peter Wadhams

The Real Truth About Health
Published on Oct 7, 2018

The Arctic may be free of ice for the first time in 10,000 years. Wadhams shows how sea ice is the ‘canary in the mine’ of planetary climate change. He describes how it forms and the vital role it plays in reflecting solar heat back into space and providing an ‘air conditioning’ system for the planet.

Prof. Peter Wadhams is the UK’s most experienced sea ice scientist, with 48 years of research on sea ice and ocean processes in the Arctic and the Antarctic. This has focused on expeditions and measurements in the field, which has involved more than 50 expeditions to both polar regions, working from ice camps, icebreakers, aircraft, and, uniquely, Royal Navy submarines (6 submerged voyages to the North Pole ). His research group in Cambridge has been the only UK group with the capacity to carry out fieldwork on sea ice.

He is Emeritus Professor of Ocean Physics and is the author of numerous publications on dynamics and thermodynamics of sea ice, sea ice thickness, waves in ice, icebergs, ocean convection and kindred topics. The current main topics of research in the group are sea ice properties, dynamics, and distributions in thickness and concentration. He is also a pioneer in the use of AUVs (autonomous underwater vehicles) under sea ice, using multibeam sonar to map bottom features, work which he has also been done from UK nuclear submarines.

He began his research career at the Scott Polar Research Institute, Cambridge University, where he rose to become Director. He moved to DAMTP in 2001. He has also held visiting professorships in Tokyo (National Institute of Polar Research), Monterey (US Naval Postgraduate School), Seattle (University of Washington) and La Jolla (Green Scholar at Scripps Institution of Oceanography).

He was the coordinator of several European Union Arctic flagship projects (ESOP, GreenICE, CONVECTION, and others) and is currently on the Steering Committee of the EU ICE-ARC project as well as a major US Office of Naval Research initiative in the Arctic. He served eight years on the Scientific Committee of the European Environment Agency and had served on panels of the National Academy of Sciences (USA).

In 1990 he received the Italgas Prize for Environmental Sciences, and he has also been awarded the Polar Medal (UK) (1987) and the W.S. Bruce Prize of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. As well as being Professor at Cambridge he is an Associate Professor at the Laboratoire d’Océanographie de Villefranche, run by Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, and is a Professor at the Università Politecnica Delle Marche, Ancona. He is a Member of the Finnish Academy and is a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society.

His most recent book, “A Farewell to Ice”, documents the ways in which the retreat of sea ice in the Arctic generates feedbacks which impact the entire global climate system, accelerating the rate of warming, the rate of sea level rise, the emission of methane from the offshore, and the occurrence of weather extremes affecting food production. He contends that catastrophic consequences cannot be avoided without making an all-out effort to develop ways of directly capturing carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere.