Daily Archives: August 14, 2018

Glacier melt in B.C. at ‘shocking’ levels


CBC News: The National
Published on Oct 21, 2015

Scientists say it’s just a matter of time before a warming planet causes B.C.’s glaciers to melt away altogether.

CO2 May Make Earth +10-15ºC Hotter, Like Early Paleogene


Climate State
Published on Aug 10, 2018

A new study led by scientists at the University of Bristol has warned that unless we mitigate current levels of carbon dioxide emissions, Western Europe and New Zealand could revert to the hot tropical climate of the early Paleogene period – 56-48 million years ago. https://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2018/j… Read The Atlantic article here: They were strange days at the beginning of the age of mammals. The planet was still hungover from the astonishing disappearance of its marquee superstars, the dinosaurs. Earth’s newest crater was still a smoldering system of hydrothermal vents, roiling under the Gulf of Mexico. https://www.theatlantic.com/science/a… Study: High temperatures in the terrestrial mid-latitudes during the early Palaeogene https://www.nature.com/articles/s4156…

Noam Chomsky – Nonviolent Resistance

Energy Foundation China

http://www.efchina.org/

Energy Foundation Beijing Representative Office (hereinafter referred to as “Energy Foundation China”), established in Beijing in 1999, is a grantmaking charity organization dedicated to China’s sustainable energy development. As part of the U.S.-based Energy Foundation, it is registered under the Beijing Municipal Public Security Bureau and supervised by the National Development and Reform Commission of China.

Our mission is to assist in China’s transition to a sustainable energy future by promoting energy efficiency and renewable energy.

Energy Foundation China, previously known as the China Sustainable Energy Program, was initiated with funding from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Over the years, Energy Foundation China has achieved steady growth, with our pool of funders growing. Our cumulative grantmaking in China reached more than USD260 million through 2016.

We support policy research, the development of new standards, capacity building, and dissemination of best practices across seven programs: clean power, environmental management, industry, low carbon economic growth, low carbon cities, transportation, and strategic communications, with a view to assisting China in coping with energy challenges.

By the end of 2016, Energy Foundation China had funded 2,600 projects operated by 670 grantees in China. The grantees include leading policy research institutes, academies, industry associations, local energy efficiency institutions, and NGOs in China and abroad, such as the Development Research Center of the State Council, the Energy Research Institute of the National Development and Reform Commission, Chinese Academy of Fiscal Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Tsinghua University, etc.

Key funders:

  • William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
  • The David and Lucile Packard Foundation
  • Children’s Investment Fund Foundation
  • Laura and John Arnold Foundation
  • Bloomberg Philanthropies
  • ClimateWorks Foundation
  • Oak Foundation

EF China Brochure Download:

Energy Foundation China Brochure
http://www.efchina.org/Attachments/Publication/energy-foundation-china-brochure/efc2015-brochure-en/at_download/file
=================

See also:

Grant Application
and
Jobs

Contact The Foundation

China Office
CITIC Building, Room 2403, No. 19
Jianguomenwai Dajie
Beijing 100004, P.R.
China Phone: +86-10-5821-7100
Email: china

Headquarters301
Battery Street, 5th Floor,
San Francisco, CA 94111, USA

Website: http://www.ef.org

Liu Shuang – Director of the Low Carbon Economic Growth Programme at Energy Foundation China as a participant in the BBC program:

BBC World Service – The Real Story, The Coming Pandemic

Real-story-pand.jpg

Ebola is back. In 2014, it killed over 11,000 people in West Africa. Now the disease has struck once again in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This time doctors are better equipped, with a vaccine and immunisation campaign but the outbreak highlights the ever-present dangers posed by infectious diseases. One hundred years ago the Spanish flu killed over 50 million people in just one year. And doctors now say the next pandemic will be upon us in a matter of decades. We don’t know where it will start but in a hyper-connected world we know it will spread easily. Ritula Shah asks a panel of expert guests about the scenarios that keep them up at night and whether global health infrastructure is ready for the coming pandemic.

Contributors

Laura Spinney – Author of Pale Rider, a history of the 1918 Spanish flu

Arlene King – Adjunct professor Dalla Lana school of public health at the University of Toronto

Dr Jonathan Quick – Harvard Medical School, Chair of the Global Health Council, and author of The End of Epidemics

David Heymann – Professor of infectious disease epidemiology at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine

Richard Hatchett – Chief Executive, Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations

Photo

A health worker in Liberia. Credit: Dominique Faget/AFP/Getty Images

BBC World Service – The Real Story, Extreme Heat: The New Normal?

In many parts of the world this has been a season of extreme heat. Records have been broken from North America to Europe, from the Middle East to Japan and Korea. We know the climate is changing, and that many of the reasons are man-made. International commitments to limit the average rise in global temperature – to less than two degrees above pre-industrial levels – demand concerted action around the world. Chris Morris and a panel of expert guests discuss the science behind extreme heat. What are the political solutions and the new technologies that may be able to help us? And even if we can mitigate against extreme temperatures, are heatwaves going to become the new normal?

(Photo: Cameroonian Girl sweating and drinking water from a green jerry can. Credit: Getty Images)

Contributors

Joanna Haigh – Co-Director, Grantham Institute for Climate Change, Imperial College London

James Murray – Editor of the website, BusinessGreen

Nick Loris – Economist at the Heritage Foundation, Washington DC

Liu Shuang – Director of the Low Carbon Economic Growth Programme at Energy Foundation China

Also Featuring:

Matt McGrath – BBC Environment Correspondent

Prem Shankar Jha – Author of ‘Dawn of the Solar Age: an end to global warming and fear’

Jainey Bavishi – New York Mayor’s Office of Recovery and Resiliency

Nicky Chambers – CEO of Origen Power

Scientists lay out how to save a melting Antarctica — and the rest of the world – CNN

CNN goes inside Antarctica 03:41

(CNN)Sea levels will rise and all coastal countries could be seriously threatened by flooding if nothing is done to stop the massive melt of sea ice in Antarctica, according to nine award-winning scientists who have spent decades studying the icy continent and the waters around it.

They are proposing two scenarios, onebleak, one promising, for what could happen by 2070 in Wednesday’s edition of the journal Nature.
The paper is highly speculative rather than making forecasts. These scenarios are more like data-driven conversation starters according to the authors, all who have won the Tinker-Muse Prize for Science and Policy in Antarctica game out what could happen if the world does nothing — or if policy-makers take significant action in the next 10 years to stop the destruction.
Related interactive: Protecting the Antarctic
And although you may never get to see Antarctica for yourself, these scientists want you to know that what happens in this remote region has a significant impact in your own backyard.

Story highlights

  • Nine scientists think though what could happen if sea ice melts in Antarctica by 2070
  • If no steps are taken, sea levels will rise; fish and penguins will die; the US could see $1 trillion in damage
  • If policy-makers try to limit pollution, Antarctica will still be vulnerable but can be saved

(CNN)Sea levels will rise and all coastal countries could be seriously threatened by flooding if nothing is done to stop the massive melt of sea ice in Antarctica, according to nine award-winning scientists who have spent decades studying the icy continent and the waters around it.

Related interactive: Protecting the Antarctic
And although you may never get to see Antarctica for yourself, these scientists want you to know that what happens in this remote region has a significant impact in your own backyard.

They are proposing two scenarios, onebleak, one promising, for what could happen by 2070 in Wednesday’s edition of the journal Nature.
The paper is highly speculative rather than making forecasts. These scenarios are more like data-driven conversation starters according to the authors, all who have won the Tinker-Muse Prize for Science and Policy in Antarctica game out what could happen if the world does nothing — or if policy-makers take significant action in the next 10 years to stop the destruction.

Why we should care about Antarctica

Yes, there are adorable penguins living there, but that’s not the only reason we should care about Antarctica. It is covered by ice sheets that get channeled into the oceans through a network of ice streams and glaciers. Recently, the continent has seen a reduction in the extent of floating ice shelves. The shelves have also thinned due to our warming planet, scientists think.

Penguins, Seals, and Krill: Antarctica’s fragile food chain

The Southern Ocean that surrounds the continent is vital to the health of all the rest. It soaks up more heat and carbon than any other ocean, and in doing so, it helps slow the speed with which the atmosphere is warming. The region also does the world a real service by returning nutrient-rich deep water to the surface, and it exports these nutrients to lower latitudes that rely on them to support the life in our seas.

…(read more).

Globe rallies newspapers to protect free press from Trump attacks – The Boston Globe

Lane Turner/Globe Staff
The offices of the Boston Globe at 53 State Street in downtown Boston.
By Bob Salsberg Associated Press August 10, 2018

BOSTON (AP) — A Boston newspaper is proposing a coordinated editorial response from publications across the U.S. to President Donald Trump’s frequent attacks on the news media.‘‘We are not the enemy of the people,’’ said Marjorie Pritchard, deputy managing editor for the editorial page of The Boston Globe, referring to a characterization of journalists that Trump has used in the past. The president, who contends he has largely been covered unfairly by the press, also employs the term ‘‘fake news’’ often when describing the media.

The Globe has reached out to editorial boards nationwide to write and publish editorials on Aug. 16 denouncing what the newspaper called a ‘‘dirty war against the free press.’’

…(read more).

‘Not the Enemy of the People’: 70 News Organizations Will Blast Trump’s Attack on the Media

By Cleve R. Wootson Jr., The Washington Post

The Washington Post article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/arts-and-entertainment/wp/2018/08/11/not-the-enemy-of-the-people-70-news-organizations-will-blast-trumps-attack-on-the-press/

13 August 18

For most of the past 19 months, President Trump’s war of words with American news organizations has been more of a one-sided barrage — at least according to the Boston Globe’s editorial board.

Trump labeled the news media “the enemy of the American people” a month after taking the oath of office. In the year that followed, a CNN analysis concluded, he used the word “fake” — as in “fake news,” “fake stories,” “fake media” or “fake polls” — more than 400 times. He once fumed, the New York Times reported, because a TV on Air Force One was tuned to CNN.

And last week, at a political rally in Pennsylvania, Trump told his audience that the media was “fake, fake disgusting news.”

“Whatever happened to honest reporting?” he asked the crowd. Then he pointed to a group of journalists covering the event. “They don’t report it. They only make up stories.”

… (read more).

The US’ hidden methane problem

Arch Coal’s West Elk mine near Somerset, Colorado, is the only still-active large coal mine in the North Fork Valley and is the state’s largest emitter of methane (Photo: Mark Olalde)

Published on 13/08/2018, 1:29pm

Unregulated, unnoticed coal mines across the US are leaking a potent greenhouse gas with the same greenhouse effect as 13 million cars

By Mark Olalde

Across the US, a major, uncontrolled leak of a potent greenhouse gas is going unregulated and largely unnoticed.

Climate Home News analysis of government data has identified roughly 300 active and 200 abandoned coal mines, which are the source of almost one-tenth of US methane pollution.

Methane has 34 times the long-term warming effect of carbon dioxide and accounts for 10% of US greenhouse gas emissions. Its emissions from the oil and gas industry and the efforts of the Trump administration to roll back regulations on them have been widely publicised.

Meanwhile, US coal mines released 60.5 MMTCO2e of methane in 2016, with roughly the same warming impact as 13 million cars. Efforts to control the problem are being hampered despite those with the technical expertise claiming a whole industry could be built on capturing these emissions and turning them into electricity.

Data collected by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), shows Warrior Met Coal Mining’s No 7 Mine in Alabama emits the most methane of any mine in the US.

“The coal seams Warrior Met Coal mine contain high levels of methane gas. Much of the gas is captured prior to, during and after active mining operations and distributed into commercial pipelines,” Warrior spokesperson Bill Stanhouse said in an emailed statement. Even with these efforts, the mine emits at least 262,700m3 of methane into the atmosphere per day.

The remainder of the top five methane-emitting coal mines, according to MSHA’s data, are:

  • Alliance Resource Partners’ recently closed Pattiki mine in Illinois – more than 113,300m3 per day
  • ERP Compliant Fuels’ Pinnacle Mine in West Virginia – more than 111,700m3 per day
  • Sunrise Coal’s Oaktown Fuels Mine No 1 in Indiana – more than 86,600m3 per day
  • Txoma Mining’s P8 North mine in Oklahoma – more than 81,900m3 per day

Besides Warrior, none of these companies replied to requests for comment.

The data shows many of the most gaseous abandoned mines are in Kentucky and West Virginia and belonged to large operators such as Alpha Natural Resources, which also did not respond to requests for comment, and Alliance Resource Partners. Sealing shafts and allowing abandoned mines to flood can significantly decrease methane emissions.

The owner of the third-highest emitting coal mine, ERP Compliant Fuels, is part of the Virginia Conservation Legacy Fund network, a nonprofit group that claims to be operating coal mines in order to reclaim them.

Even as US coal production has plummeted over the past decade, and the number of active mines halved, coal mine methane emissions fell at a much slower pace, EPA data published in April shows. This indicates mines are not being fully sealed as they shut down.

…(read more).