Daily Archives: July 20, 2018

ScienceCasts: The “Sleeping Giant” in Arctic Permafrost


cienceAtNASAPublished on Jun 21, 2013

Visit http://science.nasa.gov/ for breaking science news. Arctic permafrost soils contain more accumulated carbon than all the human fossil-fuel emissions since 1850 combined. Warming Arctic permafrost, poised to release its own gases into the atmosphere, could be the “sleeping giant” of climate change.

ScienceCasts: What Exploded Over Russia?


ScienceAtNASA
Published on Feb 25, 2013

Visit http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/… for more. Two weeks after an asteroid exploded over Russia’s Ural mountains, scientists are making progress understanding the origin and make-up of the unexpected space rock. This week’s ScienceCast presents their latest results.

Underwater: Rising Seas, Chronic Floods, and the Implications for US Coastal Real Estate (2018) | Union of Concerned Scientists

Hundreds of thousands of homes are at risk of chronic flooding due to sea level rise over the coming decades. The implications for coastal residents, communities, and the economy are profound.

Sea levels are rising. Tides are inching higher. High-tide floods are becoming more frequent and reaching farther inland. And hundreds of US coastal communities will soon face chronic, disruptive flooding that directly affects people’s homes, lives, and properties.

Yet property values in most coastal real estate markets do not currently reflect this risk. And most homeowners, communities, and investors are not aware of the financial losses they may soon face.

This analysis looks at what’s at risk for US coastal real estate from sea level rise—and the challenges and choices we face now and in the decades to come.

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Complete data by state
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Información disponible en español

Trump “ready” to levy tariffs on $500 billion Chinese goods

The Caribbean: Island Cultures from Slavery to Global Climate Change

For the relation with Africa see:

The History of the Dutch Slave Trade 1600- 1863


Timescape Indonesia
Published on Jul 6, 2013

The colonial Dutch empire was one of the wealthiest European empires, with colonies in Aica, the America’s and the Dutch East indies (now Indonesia),much of this wealth came from piracy, slavery and smuggling in the early centuries of this vast empire. This short film primarily explores the Slave trade, which enriched an empire, and changed the social fabric of the nations which it traded with, forever. Explore the brief history of the Dutch slave trade, from its origins to the final end of a once lucrative trade. Useful Source: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DUK8Z5O

NASA ScienceCasts: Exploring Beneath the Waves

What does a sustainable energy future look like?

Welcome to the Meghalayan Age – a new phase in history – BBC News

Image caption The famous timeline will be updated to reflect the new “stages”, or “ages”, as they are called.

By Jonathan Amos BBC Science Correspondent
18 July 2018

The official history of Earth has a new chapter – and we are in it.

Geologists have classified the last 4,200 years as being a distinct age in the story of our planet.

They are calling it the Meghalayan Age, the onset of which was marked by a mega-drought that crushed a number of civilisations worldwide.

The International Chronostratigraphic Chart, the famous diagram depicting the timeline for Earth’s history (seen on many classroom walls) will be updated.

Image copyright IUGS Image caption A portion of an Indian stalagmite that defines the beginning of the Meghalayan Age

It should be said, however, there is disquiet in the scientific community at the way the change has been introduced. Some researchers feel there has been insufficient discussion on the matter since the Meghalayan was first raised as an idea in a scholarly paper six years ago.

Geologists divide up the 4.6-billion-year existence of Earth into slices of time.

Each slice corresponds to significant happenings – such as the break-up of continents, dramatic shifts in climate, and even the emergence of particular types of animals and plant life.

…(read more).

See also:

Global surface warming enhanced by weak Atlantic overturning circulation | Nature

https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0320-y

Naturevolume 559, pages387–391 (2018)

Abstract

Evidence from palaeoclimatology suggests that abrupt Northern Hemisphere cold events are linked to weakening of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC)1, potentially by excess inputs of fresh water2. But these insights—often derived from model runs under preindustrial conditions—may not apply to the modern era with our rapid emissions of greenhouse gases. If they do, then a weakened AMOC, as in 1975–1998, should have led to Northern Hemisphere cooling. Here we show that, instead, the AMOC minimum was a period of rapid surface warming. More generally, in the presence of greenhouse-gas heating, the AMOC’s dominant role changed from transporting surface heat northwards, warming Europe and North America, to storing heat in the deeper Atlantic, buffering surface warming for the planet as a whole. During an accelerating phase from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s, the AMOC stored about half of excess heat globally, contributing to the global-warming slowdown. By contrast, since mooring observations began3,4,5 in 2004, the AMOC and oceanic heat uptake have weakened. Our results, based on several independent indices, show that AMOC changes since the 1940s are best explained by multidecadal variability6, rather than an anthropogenically forced trend. Leading indicators in the subpolar North Atlantic today suggest that the current AMOC decline is ending. We expect a prolonged AMOC minimum, probably lasting about two decades. If prior patterns hold, the resulting low levels of oceanic heat uptake will manifest as a period of rapid global surface warming.

…(read more).