Daily Archives: July 5, 2018

‘Extreme’ Changes Underway in Some of Antarctica’s Biggest Glaciers | InsideClimate News

As unusually warm ocean water melts the ice from below, the glaciers’ grounding lines are receding fast, bolstering fears of worst-case sea level rise.

Antarctica’s glaciers carry ice from the interior of the continent to the ocean. This NASA illustration shows where the ice is moving fastest; areas in red have the fastest flow, followed by those in pink and purple. Credit: NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

By Bob Berwyn, InsideClimate News Apr 2, 2018

A new analysis of satellite data has found “extreme” changes underway at eight of Antarctica’s major glaciers, as unusually warm ocean water slips in under their ice shelves.

The warmer water is eating away at the glaciers’ icy grasp on the seafloor. As a result, the grounding line—where the ice last touches bedrock—has been receding by as much as 600 feet per year, a new study shows. Behind the grounding line, the land-based ice then speeds up, increasing the rate of sea level rise.

The new continent-wide measurements of grounding lines suggests a widespread pattern of melting all around Antarctica, said University of Leeds climate researcher Hannes Konrad, lead author of the analysis published today in the scientific journal Nature Geoscience.

…(read more).

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Ashley Dawson: Extreme Cities

Ed Mays
Published on May 31, 2018
How will climate change affect our lives? Where will its impacts be most deeply felt? Are we doing enough to protect ourselves from the coming chaos? Professor of English and environmental organizer Ashley Dawson argues that highly developed urban cities are ground zero for climate change. In his book Extreme Cities: The Peril and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate Change he highlights the elevated risk of dense metropolises, which contribute the lion’s share of carbon to the atmosphere while also lying on the frontlines of rising sea levels. Today, the majority of the world’s megacities are located in coastal zones, yet few of them are adequately prepared for the floods that will increasingly menace their shores. Instead, most continue to develop luxury waterfront condos for the elite and industrial facilities for corporations. These not only intensify carbon emissions, but also place coastal residents at greater risk when water levels rise. Dawson offers an alarming portrait of the future of our cities, and urges us to invest in our cities not with fortified sea walls but through support of urban movements already fighting to remake our cities in a more just and equitable way.

Ashley Dawson is Professor of English at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. His field of specialization is postcolonial studies, with areas of interest including the experience and literature of migration. He has also worked on contemporary discourses of U.S. imperialism and on emerging global discourses of environmental governance. Dawson is the author of Extinction: A Radical History, The Routledge Concise History of Twentieth-Century British Literature, and Mongrel Nation: Diasporic Culture and the Making of Postcolonial Britain.

Thanks to Town Hall Seattle, Third Place Books and Red May
Recorded 5/6/18

See:

VisioNYC 2080 – Is New York City Prepared for Serious Sea Level Rise?

On October 6, 2011 Klaus Jacob gave the inaugural AIANY Design for Risk and Reconstruction (DfRR) presentation entitled “Vision: New York 2080.” His presentation explored the ever-changing environment of the New York region, natural and man-made, that provides the context in which we design, build, and live. Jacob looked forward beyond the 2030 or 2050 benchmarks, illuminating the opportunities and risks that need to be addressed in the design and adaptive reconstruction of the region’s built environment. This was before Hurricane Sandy.

It has been five years since Jacob first spoke and he has agreed to return, reflect upon, and comment on the changes that have taken place since then and the circumstances we now face moving forward. Jacob will review post-Sandy rebuilding efforts and ongoing urban development in NYC. He will provide insights from the context of development purely to satisfy short and medium term economic needs as opposed to those that meet the long term sustainable vision for the City considering open-ended sea level rise predictions in excess of 10 feet. Jacob and our respondent panel of urbanists will discuss whether it is possible to meet both needs. They will address the question, are we really prepared to plan for serious sea level rise?

There will be a reception prior to the event at 5:30 PM. The program will begin promptly at 6:00 PM.

Speaker: Klaus Jacob, Geophysicist, Urban Environmental Disaster Expert, Columbia University

Panelists:
Deborah Gans, FAIA, Principal, GansStudio
Donald Watson, FAIA, CIP, Principal, EarthRise Design; Professor of Architecture, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Dan Zarrilli, Senior Director, Climate Policy and Programs, NYC Office of the Mayor
Cynthia Rosenzweig, Senior Research Scientist, NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies

Moderator: Lance Jay Brown, FAIA, DPACSA, Founding Co-Chair, AIANY Design for Risk and Reconstruction Committee

Organized by: AIANY Design for Risk and Reconstruction Committee and ASLA-NY

Ashley Dawson: Extreme Cities : Pirate TV Seattle : Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming : Internet Archive

How will climate change affect our lives? Where will its impacts be most deeply felt? Are we doing enough to protect ourselves from the coming chaos? Professor of English and environmental organizer Ashley Dawson argues that highly developed urban cities are ground zero for climate change. In his book Extreme Cities: The Peril and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate Change he highlights the elevated risk of dense metropolises, which contribute the lion’s share of carbon to the atmosphere while also lying on the frontlines of rising sea levels. Today, the majority of the world’s megacities are located in coastal zones, yet few of them are adequately prepared for the floods that will increasingly menace their shores. Instead, most continue to develop luxury waterfront condos for the elite and industrial facilities for corporations. These not only intensify carbon emissions, but also place coastal residents at greater risk when water levels rise.

Dawson offers an alarming portrait of the future of our cities, and urges us to invest in our cities not with fortified sea walls but through support of urban movements already fighting to remake our cities in a more just and equitable way. Ashley Dawson is Professor of English at the Graduate Center, City University of New York. His field of specialization is postcolonial studies, with areas of interest including the experience and literature of migration. He has also worked on contemporary discourses of U.S. imperialism and on emerging global discourses of environmental governance. Dawson is the author of Extinction: A Radical History, The Routledge Concise History of Twentieth-Century British Literature, and Mongrel Nation: Diasporic Culture and the Making of Postcolonial Britain.

Thanks to Town Hall Seattle, Third Place Books and Red May, recorded 5/6/18

https://archive.org/download/scm-594975-ashleydawsonextremecities/piratetv_18_6_2_dawson.m4v

The American Denial of Global Warming – Perspectives on Ocean Science


University of California Television (UCTV)
Published on Dec 20, 2007

Polls show that between one-third and one-half of Americans still believe that there is “no solid” evidence of global warming, or that if warming is happening it can be attributed to natural variability. Others believe that scientists are still debating the point. Join scientist and renowned historian Naomi Oreskes as she describes her investigation into the reasons for such widespread mistrust and misunderstanding of scientific consensus and probes the history of organized campaigns designed to create public doubt and confusion about science. Series: “Perspectives on Ocean Science” [12/2007] [Science] [Show ID: 13459]

Extreme Cities: The Peril and Promise of Urban Life in the Age of Climate Change: Ashley Dawson

A cutting exploration of how cities drive climate change while being on the frontlines of the coming climate crisis

How will climate change affect our lives? Where will its impacts be most deeply felt? Are we doing enough to protect ourselves from the coming chaos? In Extreme Cities, Ashley Dawson argues that cities are ground zero for climate change, contributing the lion’s share of carbon to the atmosphere, while also lying on the frontlines of rising sea levels. Today, the majority of the world’s megacities are located in coastal zones, yet few of them are adequately prepared for the floods that will increasingly menace their shores. Instead, most continue to develop luxury waterfront condos for the elite and industrial facilities for corporations. These not only intensify carbon emissions, but also place coastal residents at greater risk when water levels rise.

In Extreme Cities, Dawson offers an alarming portrait of the future of our cities, describing the efforts of Staten Island, New York, and Shishmareff, Alaska residents to relocate; Holland’s models for defending against the seas; and the development of New York City before and after Hurricane Sandy. Our best hope lies not with fortified sea walls, he argues. Rather, it lies with urban movements already fighting to remake our cities in a more just and equitable way.

As much a harrowing study as a call to arms Extreme Cities is a necessary read for anyone concerned with the threat of global warming, and of the cities of the world.

See:

From Miami to Shanghai: 3C of warming will leave world cities below sea level | Environment | The Guardian

How Shanghai would look with a rise of just 2C: the UN warned this week of a potential 3C scenario. Photograph: Nickolay Lamm/Courtesy Climate Central

Hundreds of millions of urban dwellers around the world face their cities being inundated by rising seawaters if latest UN warnings that the world is on course for 3C of global warming come true, according to a Guardian data analysis.

Famous beaches, commercial districts and swaths of farmland will be threatened at this elevated level of climate change, which the UN warned this week is a very real prospect unless nations reduce their carbon emissions.

Data from the Climate Central group of scientists analysed by Guardian journalists shows that 3C of global warming would ultimately lock in irreversible sea-level rises of perhaps two metres. Cities from Shanghai to Alexandria, and Rio to Osaka are among the worst affected. Miami would be inundated – as would the entire bottom third of the US state of Florida.

…(read more).