Daily Archives: March 14, 2018

Lessons from Holland on fighting rising sea levels


CBS Sunday Morning
Published on Aug 27, 2017

Windmills are more than just a traditional part of the Dutch landscape; they have played a key role in the war Holland has waged against the sea for centuries. Today the Dutch are using ever-more innovative methods to combat rising sea levels, strategies that may also benefit other nations confronting the effects of climate change. Martha Teichner reports. Originally broadcast on May 21, 2017.

What the lowlands can teach about warding off high water


PBS NewsHour
Published on Oct 29, 2013

Superstorm Sandy showed U.S. coastal cities the damage water can do — a threat the Dutch have lived with for centuries. Their system of dams and dikes, locks and levees is keeping the Netherlands safe in a world with rising seas. Miles O’Brien reports on what Americans can learn from the Dutch model of flood management.

Why The Netherlands Isn’t Under Water


Real Engineering
Published on Oct 31, 2017

Malaria and the Fall of Rome


koniec19
Published on May 8, 2016

Roman Art and Archaeology. Rome in Late Antiquity (305 – 608 CE)

Holland’s Barriers to The Sea


Largest Dams
Published on Apr 19, 2014

The Delta Works in the Netherlands (Holland) is the largest flood protection project in the world. This project consists of a number of surge barriers, for examples:

1- The Oosterscheldekering is the largest of the 13 ambitious Delta Works series of dams and storm surge barriers and it is the largest surge barrier in the world, 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) long. The dam is based on 65 concrete pillars with 62 steel doors, each 42 metres wide. It is designed to protect the Netherlands from flooding from the North Sea.

2- The Maeslantkering is a storm barrier with two movable arms; when the arms are open the waterway remains an important shipping route however when the arms close a protective storm barrier is formed for the city of Rotterdam. Closing the arms of the barrier is a completely automated process done without human intervention.

The Great Wall of Louisiana


Largest Dams
Published on Feb 1, 2016

The IHNC Lake Borgne Surge Barrier also called the Great Wall of Louisiana is a storm surge barrier constructed near the confluence of and across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway and the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet near New Orleans. The barrier runs generally north-south from a point just east of Michoud Canal on the north bank of the GIWW and just south of the existing Bayou Bienvenue flood control structure. Navigation gates where the barrier crosses the GIWW and Bayou Bienvenue reduce the risk of storm surge coming from Lake Borgne and/or the Gulf of Mexico. Another navigation gate (Seabrook Floodgate) has been constructed in the Seabrook vicinity where the IHNC meets Lake Pontchartrain to block a storm surge from entering the IHNC from the Lake.

Louisiana Disappearing: Living On The Brink Of Climate Change


AJ+

Published on Dec 2, 2015

Every hour, Louisiana loses a football field worth of land to the Gulf of Mexico, thanks to rising sea levels and canals dredged by oil and gas companies. At this rate, most of southeastern Louisiana not protected by levees will be underwater in just 50 years.