Daily Archives: February 13, 2018

‘Day Zero’ Nears For Cape Town As Water Runs Low | On Point

January 25, 2018

Water in a major city in South Africa is expected to run out by April.

Cape Town officials are calling it “Day Zero.” After prodding residents to conserve water — and largely failing — the government will shut off the taps entirely on April 12, CBS News foreign correspondent Debora Patta explained in an appearance on the NPR show On Point Thursday.

“The city can no longer cope with its population and the tourists coming in,” Patta said.

Patta joined our program as part of our discussion Thursday about how the world will be able to handle 10 billion people. It’s estimated to hit that mark in 2050.

Population problems are playing out already in drought-stricken Cape Town, where growth has put a massive strain on resources. Cape Town has been dealing with three successive droughts, along with higher temperatures due to climate change.

Residents of Cape Town have had to wait in line to get their allotment of 25 liters of water; to comply with water restrictions, they’re supposed to use the water to shower, then re-use the water, collecting it to flush toilets.

“It’s a very difficult situation and I think for a lot of people it’s a shock — they can’t quite believe that this is really going to happen, and there is a lot of denial,” Patta said.

We also talked Thursday to Charles Mann, whose previous books include “1491” and “1493.” His new book, “The Wizard and the Prophet,” looks at dueling visions about the future of humanity.

Mann explained that previous efforts to control population by coercion ended up veering into grave human rights abuses, like forced abortions and sterilizations.

They were also mostly unsuccessful in controlling the population.

“What is really effective is empowering women by giving them education, an opportunity to make a living,” Mann said.

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Inside Trump’s Plan For Rebuilding American Roads, Railways And Airports | On Point

February 13, 2018  With guest host Jane Clayson.

President Donald Trump releases an infrastructure plan that he says will generate upwards of $1.5 trillion in investment. Can he finally bring everything from our bridges to our water systems up to snuff — and make America modern agaiin.

Note: For an uninterrupted livestream of this show, visit member station WNPR.

This show airs Tuesday at 10 a.m. EST.

Guests:

Lauren Gardner, transportation and infrastructure reporter for Politico Pro. (@Gardner_LM)

Ed Rendell, former governor of Pennsylvania, co-chair of Building America’s Future Educational Fund. (@GovEdRendell)

Nick Sobczyk, reporter for E&E News. (@nick_sobczyk)

Dean Franks, senior vice president for congressional relations at the American Road & Transportation Builders Association.

* * * *

[Analysts of President Trump’s infrastructure “plan” have observed that it is in fact no plan at all — especially since it ignores the key component of what will be crucial for any rational infrastructure planning from now onward.  It is clear to anyone who considers the issues that climate change has to be at the center of all planning procedures going forward.

Scientists have been arguing for many years that as a country, as a civilization as a species we will need to get beyond the “emergency response” mode and move into some sober long-term planning for the infrastructure. This will be necessary to cope with sea-level rise, agricultural collapse, fresh-water scarcity and the predictable ensuing human migrations and exploding public health problems that are already rampant in ever larger regions of the world.  We need to think about the next stages of “Vulnerability & Preparedness Analysis” and long-term “Resilience & Adaptation Planning.”

EV&N-141-title-slide-500President Trump’s much trumpeted “infrastructure” plan does not address these questions adequately, simply because it is not based on sound science and therefore ignores the context within which all infrastructural planning needs to take place — that is, the natural world in which human civilization is embedded.  Sea-level is not a “Democratic conspiracy.”  Climate change is not a Chinese hoax. ]

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Fortunately, although the United States suffers now from a total lack of adequate vision to guide its national infrastructure planning, there are signs that citizens are getting organized throughout the country on a municipal and regional basis to address pressing problems with the best science available.   These citizen-science alliances are sponsoring new kinds of public educational initiatives like the Beacon Hill Seminar series of eight sessions in Boston on “Climate Vulnerability.”

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The Honorable Tip O’Neil was famous for saying that “All politics is local.”  It may well be that for the foreseeable future as well all effective action on climate will have to be local as well.  The urgency for action is becoming ever more apparent.]

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Ted Cruz: I don’t believe in climate change because I ‘follow the science’


Raw Story
Published on Mar 24, 2015

Mitch McConnell’s Not Happy Talking About Climate Change


acttv
Published on Oct 8, 2014

Mitch McConnell made a surprise appearance on Kentucky Sports Radio with host Matt Jones. Things got a little testy when the senator was asked about climate change.

The Internet Is Dead Without Net Neutrality


acttv
Published on Dec 4, 2017

The FCC is set to repeal Net Neutrality on Dec 14th. This is the defining bipartisan issue of our time. We cannot let Net Neutrality die

China and the environment


CGTN Africa
Published on Feb 12, 2018

There is a global trend to pay more attention to the environment. China is one of the countries championing a more conducive environment across the world. The country is now the world leader in renewable technologies. Find out how China has been able to make this happen.

Climate Ready Boston


Boston City TV
Published on Dec 20, 2016

At City Hall, Mayor Walsh releases the Climate Ready Boston Action Plan. By explaining the cause and effects of climate change, combined with active initiatives set forth by experts and political officials, the plan will help prepare Boston for the effects of climate change in the coming decades.