Daily Archives: February 3, 2018

Living on the Water: Sea Level Change from Venice to Boston & Venetian Art & Architecture


Boston College
Published on Oct 12, 2017

Living on the Water: Coasts, Development, and Sea Level Change from Venice to Boston  EESC170201 – Gail Kineke, Earth and Environmental Sciences
&
Living on the Water: Venetian Art, Architecture, and the Environment, ARTH170101  Stephanie Leone, Art History

1 Natural Science + 1 Arts TTh 9–10:15 + TTh 3–4:15 Tues. 6–7:50 reserved for reflection sessions (4 times during the semester)

These paired courses pose two questions: how does the environment affect humans, and how do humans influence the environment? Venice and Boston offer exemplary case studies of the relationship of humans and the environment in the development of coastal cities. They encourage us to think critically about human and natural history from the rich perspectives of geology and art history, probing the codependence of humans and the environment. Students study the natural processes that define coastlines; their impact on Venice’s history, politics, commerce, art, and architecture; the effect of development on the coastline; and the threat of rising sea levels on the futures of Venice and Boston.

To register for these courses:

Register for both EESC170201 and ARTH170101

Advertisements

NASA | Rising Seas: Science on the Greenland Ice Sheet


NASA Goddard
Published on Sep 15, 2015

Enjoy a deep dive into sea level rise research as NASA scientists and their colleagues discuss their research on and around the Greenland Ice Sheet. To learn more about NASA research and the study of sea level rise, go to http://www.nasa.gov/goddard/risingseas

ScienceCasts: The Hidden Meltdown of Greenland


ScienceAtNASA
Published on Aug 28, 2015

Visit http://science.nasa.gov/ for more. NASA-supported researchers have found that ice covering Greenland is melting faster than previously thought. The action is happening out of sight, below the surface.

NASA | The Ocean: A Driving Force for Weather and Climate


NASA Goddard
Published on Aug 3, 2012

The Ocean is essential to life on Earth. Most of Earth’s water is stored in the ocean. Although 40 percent of Earth’s population lives within, or near coastal regions- the ocean impacts people everywhere. Without the ocean, our planet would be uninhabitable. This animation helps to convey the importance of Earth’s oceanic processes as one component of Earth’s interrelated systems. This animation uses Earth science data from a variety of sensors on NASA Earth observing satellites to measure physical oceanography parameters such as ocean currents, ocean winds, sea surface height and sea surface temperature. These measurements, in combination with atmospheric measurements such as surface air temperature, precipitation and clouds can help scientists understand the ocean’s impact on weather and climate and what this means for life here on Earth. NASA satellites and their unique view from space are helping to unveil the vast… and largely unexplored…. OCEAN. NASA Earth Observing System Data and Information Systems (EOSDIS) EOSDIS is a distributed system of twelve data centers and science investigator processing systems. EOSDIS processes, archives, and distributes data from Earth observing satellites, field campaigns, airborne sensors, and related Earth science programs. These data enable the study of Earth from space to advance scientific understanding. For more information about the data sets used in this animation please visit,http://earthdata.nasa.gov This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: ‪http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11056

NASA | Taking Earth’s Temperature


NASA Goddard
Published on Nov 24, 2009

For more information visit http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/ClimateEssen… Next month, world leaders will gather in Copenhagen at the United Nations Climate Change Conference to negotiate a new global climate treaty. In anticipation of this event, NASA has compiled a multimedia resource collection for editors and producers developing climate-related stories. Taking Earths Temperature, a short film explaining how researchers use computer models to study climate change, is one of the many resources included in the gallery. Organized by topic, the videos, data visualizations, conceptual animations, and print-resolution images illustrate key concepts and discoveries in climate science. The compilation also features ten of NASAs most popular climate visualizations.

NASA | IPCC Projections of Temperature and Precipitation in the 21st Century


NASA Goddard
Published on Sep 27, 2013

New data visualizations from the NASA Center for Climate Simulation and NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio show how climate models

NASA | Taking Earth’s Temperature


NASA Goddard
Published on Nov 24, 2009

For more information visit http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/ClimateEssen… Next month, world leaders will gather in Copenhagen at the United Nations Climate Change Conference to negotiate a new global climate treaty. In anticipation of this event, NASA has compiled a multimedia resource collection for editors and producers developing climate-related stories. Taking Earths Temperature, a short film explaining how researchers use computer models to study climate change, is one of the many resources included in the gallery.