Daily Archives: February 21, 2017

QGIS Uncovered

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL7HotvlLKHCs9nD1fFUjSOsZrsnctyV2R

QGIS Georeferencing Historical Maps v. 2.12 Lyon


Harvard CGA

Published on Feb 29, 2016

How to use the Georeferencer in QGIS 2.12 to rubber sheet historical maps. This tutorial demonstrates how to get a rough placement for the historical map using vector layers, and how to pin the historic map features to online basemaps with the Open Layers Plugin.

Demo by Lex Berman, for the QGIS Workshop: http://maps.cga.harvard.edu/qgis/

Introduction to the WorldMap Warper Tool


Harvard CGA

Published on Oct 31, 2014

This is a brief introduction by Kirk Goldsberry to the Warper tool hosted by Harvard University. In addition to downloading the resulting file as a GeoTIFF, it is also possible to bring you map into another system using the WMS link also available on the Export tab. During Rectification (or warping) please not that one can click on “Control Points” below the map and view the points as you are creating them. There are also advanced warping options available by clicking “Advanced Options”.

NYPL Map Warper Tutorial


Debbie Rabina

Published on Mar 13, 2014

Learn how to use the New York Public Library’s Map Warper tool to bring the past into the digital present.
This tutorial will show you how to overlay historical maps onto present day locations by georectfying, or warping maps from the NYPL collection

UNICEF: 1.4 million children face death from famine

Food-matters

UN seeks $1.9 million to address situation

Pruitt – Timeline

https://www.facebook.com/EcoWatch/videos/1423998830953117/
Unfit to Lead the EPADonald Trump said that he wants to “get rid” of the EPA, and Scott Pruitt is the man he has chosen to do it.

The Senate is about to vote on Pruitt, click on this Earthjustice petition to call your senator and tell them to vote

‘Keep Your Tiny Hands Off Our Data’

http://www.ecowatch.com/trump-science-march-2276071984.html
Climate Nexus

Hundreds of scientists gathered in Boston’s Copley Square on Sunday to “stand up for science,” marking the latest protest in a wave of outspoken political engagement from scientists in reaction to the Trump administration.

The rally, timed to coincide with the annual American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Boston, brought together concerned scientists and activists from across the country.

While the event’s organizers did not explicitly call out Trump, the signs protesters toted highlighted a larger concern for science’s future. As Chris Mooney wrote in the Washington Post, “The challenges for scientists during the Trump administration could not only be bigger, but also potentially more diverse, than those seen during George W. Bush’s administration.”

Geoffrey Supran, a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who studies renewable energy solutions to climate change, told the AP, scientists are responding to the Trump administration’s “anti-science rhetoric.”

“We’re really trying to send a message today to Mr. Trump that America runs on science, science is the backbone of our prosperity and progress,” Supran said.

News: AP, Washington Post, The Hill, Boston Globe, Christian Science Monitor

Commentary: Washington Post, Chris Mooney analysis

For more climate change and clean energy news, you can follow Climate Nexus on Twitter and Facebook, and sign up for daily Hot News.

Climate Nexus

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Assault on the EPA Begins: Trump to Sign Two Executive Orders

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Here’s How This Artist Is Fighting Against Trump’s War on the Environment

GOP to NASA: Forget Climate Science, Focus on Space

http://www.ecowatch.com/nasa-climate-change-2274296275.html

Lorraine Chow

For years, Republican lawmakers have tried to scrap NASA‘s climate change research in favor of space exploration, but with President Trump and his cabinet of climate skeptics now in control, the space agency’s earth sciences budget could finally be on the chopping block.

Rep. Lamar Smith (R-Texas), the notoriously science-averse chairman of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology, told E&E News he wants a “rebalancing” of NASA’s mission.

…(read more).

Assault on the EPA Begins: Trump to Sign Two Executive Orders

http://www.ecowatch.com/epa-pruitt-trump-2276037345.html
Climate Nexus

The Trump administration is expected to begin attacks on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and climate science at the executive level now that the administration has a leader in place at the agency.

Multiple outlets have reported that President Trump may be planning a visit to EPA headquarters as early as this week, where he could sign executive orders targeting Obama administration climate policies and the agency’s structure.

The Washington Post added additional details yesterday evening, reporting that two executive orders being prepared target the Clean Power Plan and the Waters of the U.S rule for a revamp, while also lifting a moratorium on coal leasing on federal land. Congress is keeping busy with climate rollbacks too, as the Senate eyes a vote on methane regulations this week.

As the Washington Post noted:

One executive order—which the Trump administration will couch as reducing U.S. dependence on other countries for energy—will instruct the Environmental Protection Agency to begin rewriting the 2015 regulation that limits greenhouse-gas emissions from existing electric utilities. It also instructs the Interior Department’s Bureau of Land Management (BLM) to lift a moratorium on federal coal leasing.

A second order will instruct the EPA and Army Corps of Engineers to revamp a 2015 rule, known as the Waters of the United States rule, that applies to 60 percent of the water bodies in the country. That regulation was issued under the 1972 Clean Water Act, which gives the federal government authority over not only major water bodies but also the wetlands, rivers and streams that feed into them. It affects development as well as some farming operations on the grounds that these activities could pollute the smaller or intermittent bodies of water that flow into major ones.

…(read more).