Daily Archives: September 23, 2016

Jonathan Patz: Climate, Health Risks and Opportunities


Climate State

Published on Sep 23, 2016

How can we protect human health from the effects of climate change? Professor Jonathan Patz relates the historic outcomes of the UN Conference of the Parties meeting (COP21) to his more than two decades of research on the health effects of climate change and shows how a low-carbon economy can offer large public health opportunities.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice
Public Health

Merchants of Doubt 2014 Documentary


Bronsen Linnette

Published on May 31, 2016

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Erik M. Conway – Merchants of Doubt: How Climate Science Became a Victim of th e Cold War


Earth101

Published on Sep 14, 2015

There is a long-standing “debate” over the reality of anthropogenic climate change between the mainstream climate science community and a handful of “skeptics,” most, though not all, of whom are financed by fossil-fuel companies and right-wing political foundations. This is well documented. Less well documented, and far less well understood, is the motivation of these deniers. Conway (2008) briefly argued that they are motivated by market fundamentalism. In Merchants of Doubt, Oreskes and Conway (2010) have also argued that this market fundamentalism is rooted in the American Cold War experience. In this talk, Conway will discuss the origin of one of the principal founts of misinformation about climate science, the George C. Marshall Institute, in the political fight over the Strategic Defense Initiative.

Erik Conway is a historian of science and technology residing in Pasadena, CA, currently employed by the California Institute of Technology. He studies and documents the history of space exploration, and examines the intersections of space science, Earth science, and technological change. Conway has co-authored two books with Naomi Oreskes on climate change, the Merchants of Doubt (2010), concerning the deliberate misrepresentation of climate change by a few high-level scientists, and The Collapse of ‘Western’ Civilization (2014), a science-based work of fiction that gives a critique of our present time from a future perspective.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

How Dead is Denial?


Earth101

Published on Sep 23, 2016

How dead is denial? Stefan Rahmstorf and Michael E. Mann talk about denial and the science of climate change.

Michael E. Mann is Distinguished Professor of Atmospheric Science at Penn State University and director of the Penn State Earth System Science Center (ESSC).

Mann received his Ph.D. in Geology & Geophysics from Yale University. His research involves use of theoretical models and observational data to better understand Earth’s climate system. He was a Lead Author on the Observed Climate Variability and Change chapter of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Third Scientific Assessment Report in 2001 and has received a number of honors including NOAA’s outstanding publication award in 2002, the Hans Oeschger Medal of the European Geosciences Union in 2012 and the National Conservation Achievement Award for science by the National Wildlife Federation in 2013. He also contributed, with other IPCC authors, to the award of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize. He made Bloomberg News list of fifty most influential people in 2013.

Dr. Mann is author of more than 190 peer-reviewed publications and has published the books Dire Predictions: Understanding Climate Change and The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars: Dispatches from the Front Lines. He co-founded the award-winning science website RealClimate.org.

Stefan Rahmstorf obtained his PhD in oceanography at Victoria University of Wellington in 1990. He has worked as a scientist at the New Zealand Oceanographic Institute, at the Institute of Marine Science in Kiel and since 1996 at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research. His work focuses on the role of the oceans in climate change.

In 1999 Rahmstorf was awarded the $ 1 million Centennial Fellowship Award of the US-based James S. McDonnell foundation. Since 2000 he teaches Physics of the Oceans as a professor at Potsdam University. Rahmstorf served from 2004–2013 in the German Advisory Council on Global Change (WBGU) and was one of the lead authors of the 4th IPCC Assessment Report.

Dr. Rahmstorf has published over 100 scientific papers (30 in leading journals such as Nature, Science and PNAS) and co-authored four books. Available in English are Our Threatened Oceans (2009, with Katherine Richardson) and The Climate Crisis (2010, with David Archer).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Museum of African American History Reception


The White House

Published on Sep 23, 2016

President Obama and the First Lady will attend a reception for the opening of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and
Culture at the White House.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Naomi Klein: ‘Let Them Drown: the violence of othering in a warming world’


London Review of Books (LRB)

Published on May 25, 2016

Read the lecture: http://lrb.me/290
In her 2016 Edward W. Said lecture, Naomi Klein examines how Said’s ideas of racial hierarchy, including Orientalism, have been the silent partners to climate change since the earliest days of the steam engine, continuing to present day decisions to let entire nations drown and others warm to lethal levels. The lecture looks at how Said’s bold universalist vision might form the basis for a response to climate change grounded in radical inclusion, belonging and restorative justice.

ABOUT THE LRB

Since 1979, the London Review of Books has stood up for the tradition of the literary and intellectual essay in English. Each issue contains up to 15 long reviews and essays by academics, writers and journalists. There are also shorter art and film reviews, as well as poems and a lively letters page.

A typical issue moves through political commentary to science or ancient history by way of literary criticism and social anthropology. So, for example, an issue can open with a piece on the rhetoric of war, move on to reassessing the reputation of Pythagoras, follow that with articles on the situation in Iraq, the 19th-century super-rich, Nabokov’s unpublished novel, how saints got to be saints, the life and work of William Empson, and an assessment of the poetry of Alice Oswald.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Big Thinking – Naomi Klein: This changes everything: Capitalism vs. the climate


IdeasIdees

Published on May 29, 2016

Forget everything you think you know about global warming. The really inconvenient truth is that it’s not about carbon—it’s about capitalism. The convenient truth is that we can seize this existential crisis to transform our failed system and build something radically better. In her most provocative talk yet, Naomi Klein, award‐winning journalist, syndicated columnist and New York Times bestselling author, tackles the most profound threat humanity has ever faced: the war our economic model is waging against life on earth.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice