Daily Archives: September 9, 2016

After legal disappointment, North Dakota pipeline protesters vow to fight on


PBS NewsHour

Published on Sep 9, 2016

There’s been a months-long standoff over the construction of a $3.8 billion pipeline extension designed to run near tribal land in North Dakota. On Friday, a federal judge denied the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s request to stop the project. But minutes later, three federal agencies asked the company to voluntarily put the project on hold. Lisa Desjardins speaks with William Brangham for more.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

The Human Impact on the Natural Environment: Past, Present, and Future: Andrew S. Goudie

The seventh edition of this classic student text explores the multitude of impacts that humans have had over time upon vegetation, animals, soils, water, landforms and the atmosphere. It also looks into the future and considers the ways in which climate changes and modifications in land cover may change the environment in coming decades.

Extensively re-written, it contains many new statistical tables, figures, and references. It is essential reading for undergraduates in geography and environmental science, and for those who want a thorough, wide-ranging and balanced overview of the impacts of humans upon natural processes and systems from the Stone Age to the Anthropocene and who wish to understand the major environmental issues that concern the human race at the present time.

Additional resources for this book can be found at: www.wiley.com/go/goudiehumanimpact.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

The Earth Transformed: An Introduction to Human Impacts on the Environment: Andrew S. Goudie, Heather A. Viles

The Earth Transformed answers the need for a concise, non-technical introduction to the ways in which the natural environment has been and is being affected by human activities. It is simply and engagingly written, and illustrated with maps, diagrams, figures and photographs.

Among the subjects described and considered by the authors are desertification, deforestation, wetland management, biodiversity, climatic change, air pollution, the impact of cities on climate and hydrology, erosion, salinization, waste disposal, sea level rise, marine pollution, coral reef degradation and aquaculture.

The book is organized around 45 case studies taken from all parts of the globe and chosen for their intrinsic interest and representative nature. Further features of the book include guides to further reading, suggestions for debate and study, and a glossary of terms.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Geomorphology in the Anthropocene: Andrew S. Goudie, Heather A. Viles

The Anthropocene is a major new concept in the Earth sciences and this book examines the effects on geomorphology within this period. Drawing examples from many different global environments, this comprehensive volume demonstrates that human impact on landforms and land-forming processes is profound, due to various driving forces, including: use of fire; extinction of fauna; development of agriculture, urbanisation, and globalisation; and new methods of harnessing energy.

The book explores the ways in which future climate change due to anthropogenic causes may further magnify effects on geomorphology, with respect to future hazards such as floods and landslides, the state of the cryosphere, and sea level. The book concludes with a consideration of the ways in which landforms are now being managed and protected. Covering all major aspects of geomorphology, this book is ideal for undergraduate and graduate students studying geomorphology, environmental science and physical geography, and for all researchers of geomorphology.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

USDA Announces Increased International Collaboration on Agricultural Science | National Institute of Food and Agriculture

WASHINGTON, Sept. 6, 2016 –The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) today announced an enhanced funding partnership with Israel to better leverage new agricultural research for mutual scientific benefit. The updated agreement is administered by the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA) and the U.S.-Israel Binational Agricultural Research and Development Fund (BARD (link is external)).

“This partnership is a win for international scientific collaboration,” said NIFA Director Sonny Ramaswamy. “The enhanced NIFA-BARD agreement will use funding and scientific resources to meet common research goals and have a positive global impact.”

Beginning in early 2017, Israeli scientists can align their research with Fiscal Year 2016 NIFA-funded competitive grant research projects of mutual benefit to both nations. This new opportunity builds on an existing 2013 NIFA-BARD agreement to promote joint research, which has already resulted in the development of a model wastewater reuse program and analysis of hydrophobic soil in dry climates

Through this agreement, U.S. scientists have two ways to collaborate with Israeli researchers either through new joint research projects or by coupling Israeli scientists’ new projects to NIFA projects on the same topic. In both cases the Israeli scientists will receive funding through BARD, and the U.S. scientists will receive funding through NIFA. The resulting research will amplify both the funds and knowledge base to strengthen research outcomes. Some of the research areas of interest for this U.S.-Israel collaborative initiative include food security, water for agriculture, food safety, sustainable bioenergy, and bioproducts.

…(read more).
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Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice
Food-Matters

How the TPP Undermines Climate Change Goals for Agriculture

Climate change is expected to disrupt agricultural production, therefore increasing food price volatility in years to come.
iStock/fotokostic

Two big international agreements have been in the news lately. Last week, President Obama and Chinese President Xi Jinping signed onto the Paris Agreement on climate. The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) involving a dozen countries and covering 40 percent of the global economy, has become a hot button issue in the Presidential election. Unfortunately, like stubborn school children the two agreements aren’t talking to each other—and our planet and food systems could pay the price, according to the new report The Climate Cost of Free Trade: How the TPP and other trade deals undermine the Paris climate agreement by the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy.

National commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, covering sectors like energy, agriculture, and forestry, are at the heart of the Paris climate agreement. Nearly 80 percent of countries’ national climate plans (known as Intended Nationally Determined Contributions or INDCs) include actions on agriculture. Countries are grappling with the best strategies to both reduce agricultural emissions and adapt their food production to climate change. Yet, the policy straightjackets of current trade regimes are major obstacles.

The global food system, including agricultural production and associated land use, is responsible for one-third of global greenhouse gases. The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) identifies the top sources of agricultural emissions as coming from methane produced by livestock (39 percent of the sector’s GHG emissions, with much of this from large-scale, confined operations) and nitrous oxide from synthetic fertilizers used to grow commodity crops, such as corn and soybeans. While agriculture’s direct emissions are considerable, the FAO estimates that an additional 4 billion tons of carbon dioxide equivalent are emitted annually due to deforestation associated with expanded agricultural production.

Most of agriculture’s global emissions mirror the growth of an industrial model of agriculture designed to compete in global markets and take advantage of trade rules put in place over the last several decades. Trade deals, including the TPP, accelerate the expansion of this industrial model.

…(read more).

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice
Food-Matters

Environmental Change Institute -25th Anniversary

2016 marks the 25th anniversary of the Environmental Change Institute and offers us an opportunity to celebrate a quarter of a century of purposeful environmental research, education and outreach. Find out more about our programme of activities planned across the year.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Has the EPA Gone Overboard on Climate Change?


FORA.tv

Published on Sep 8, 2016

Watch the full Intelligence Squared U.S. debate “Climate Change: The EPA Has Gone Overboard” → http://smarturl.it/ClimateChangeDebate

For the motion:
• Charles McConnell, Rice University’s Energy and Environment Initiative
• Michael Nasi, Jackson Walker LLP

Against the motion:
• Carl Pope, Former Executive Director, Sierra Club
• Jody Freeman, Harvard Law School Environmental Law and Policy Program

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

How Do We Get Congress To Stop TPP? (w/Guest Host: Alex Lawson & guest: Lori Wallach)


thomhartmann

Published on Sep 8, 2016

Guest host Alex Lawson speaks with Lori Wallach, Executive Director of Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch, about how to talk to Congress members about stopping the Trans Pacific Partnership.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Senator Ed Markey Urges Action to Combat the Zika Virus, September 8, 2016


Senator Markey

Published on Sep 8, 2016

United States Senate Floor

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice