Daily Archives: September 7, 2016

Seeing the future of climate policy under the next president

E120, e130,

Changes in anthropogenic carbon storage in the Northeast Pacific in the last decade – Chu

In order to understand the ocean’s role as a sink for anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2), it is important to quantify changes in the amount of anthropogenic CO2 stored in the ocean interior over time. From August to September 2012, an ocean acidification cruise was conducted along a portion of the P17N transect (50°N 150°W to 33.5°N 135°W) in the Northeast Pacific. These measurements are compared with data from the previous occupation of this transect in 2001 to estimate the change in the anthropogenic CO2 inventory in the Northeast Pacific using an extended multiple linear regression (eMLR) approach.

Maximum increases in the surface waters were 11 µmol kg−1 over 11 years near 50°N. Here, the penetration depth of anthropogenic CO2 only reached ∼300 m depth, whereas at 33.5°N, penetration depth reached ∼600 m. The average increase of the depth-integrated anthropogenic carbon inventory was 0.41 ± 0.12 mol m−2 yr−1 across the transect. Lower values down to 0.20 mol m−2 yr−1 were observed in the northern part of the transect near 50°N and increased up to 0.55 mol m−2 yr−1 toward 33.5°N. This increase in anthropogenic carbon in the upper ocean resulted in an average pH decrease of 0.002 ± 0.0003 pH units yr−1 and a 1.8 ± 0.4 m yr−1 shoaling rate of the aragonite saturation horizon. An average increase in apparent oxygen utilization of 13.4 ± 15.5 µmol kg−1 centered on isopycnal surface 26.6 kg m−3 from 2001 to 2012 was also observed.

Harvard Library access.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Latest ocean warming review reveals extent of impacts on nature and humans

Ocean warming is affecting humans in direct ways and the impacts are already being felt, including effects on fish stocks and crop yields, more extreme weather events and increased risk from water-borne diseases, according to what has been called the most comprehensive review available on the issue, launched today by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) at the IUCN World Conservation Congress in Hawai’i.

The report, Explaining ocean warming: Causes, scale, effects and consequences, reviews the effects of ocean warming on species, ecosystems and on the benefits oceans provide to humans. Compiled by 80 scientists from 12 countries, it highlights detectable scientific evidence of impacts on marine life, from microorganisms to mammals, which are likely to increase significantly even under a low emissions scenario.

…(read more).

International Union for Conservation of Nature. (2016, September 6). Latest ocean warming review reveals extent of impacts on nature and humans. ScienceDaily. Retrieved September 7, 2016 from www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160906085016.htm

International Union for Conservation of Nature. “Latest ocean warming review reveals extent of impacts on nature and humans.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 6 September 2016. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/09/160906085016.htm>.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

America’s Murderous Legacy in Laos


TheRealNews

Published on Sep 7, 2016

As Barack Obama becomes the first sitting U.S. president to visit Laos, The Real News brings you an interview with Fred Branfman, the man who first exposed America’s secret bombing campaign there

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Hungary prepares for anti-refugee referendum


euronews (in English)

Published on Sep 7, 2016

Less than one month to go before the referendum in Hungary and the streets are full with different types of billboards. The Hungarian people must answer the following question on 2nd October: “Do you want to allow the European Union to mandate the resettlement of non-Hungarian citizens to Hungary without the approval of the National Assembly?”

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Water Protectors Lock Their Bodies to Machines to Stop Dakota Access Pipeline Construction


Democracy Now!

Published on Sep 7, 2016

http://democracynow.org – As a temporary restraining order that halts construction on part of the Dakota Access pipeline was issued Tuesday, about 100 people again shut down construction on another part of the pipeline by obstructing equipment. Some of them locked themselves to the heavy machinery. Native Americans from across the U.S. and Canada continue to arrive at the resistance camps. We speak with Tara Houska, national campaigns director for Honor the Earth.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Standing Rock Sioux Tribe’s Lawyer: Judge’s Ruling Allows Dakota Access to “De secrate” Sacred Ground


Democracy Now!

Published on Sep 7, 2016

http://democracynow.org – In Washington, D.C., a federal judge has ruled that construction on sacred tribal burial sites in the path of the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline can continue. Yesterday, U.S. District Judge James Boasberg issued a temporary restraining order that halts construction only between Route 1806 and Lake Oahe, but still allows construction to continue west of this area. The ruling does not protect the land where, on Saturday, hundreds of Native Americans forced Dakota Access to halt construction, despite the company’s security forces attacking the crowd with dogs and pepper spray. This part of the construction site is a sacred tribal burial ground. We get an update from Stephanie Tsosie, associate attorney with Earthjustice who helps represent the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe in its lawsuit against the Army Corps of Engineers over the Dakota Access pipeline.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice