Daily Archives: September 5, 2016

President Obama Holds a Press Conference


The White House

Published on Sep 5, 2016

Hangzhou, China

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

An Energy Revolution is Possible


Friends of the Earth International

Published on Sep 5, 2016

A short animation explaining our report that with money in hidden in tax havens we can power half the world with 100% renewable energy. Please share and join our fight for climate justice.

You can read more in our report here: http://www.foei.org/resources/an-ener…

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Jill Stein’s ‘green’ view on the economy


RT America

Published on Sep 5, 2016

Ameera David talks to Green Party Presidential candidate Dr. Jill Stein about her economic priorities for America and the platform that results from those ideas.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Saving Planet Earth & Stop Climate Change – Geoengineering


The secret space

Published on Jun 4, 2016

For more science and technology videos and documentaries, please subscribe to my channel The secret space: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC3B8…

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Dakota Access Pipeline Company Attacks Native American Protesters with Dogs & Pepper Spray


Democracy Now!

Published on Sep 3, 2016

On September 3, the Dakota Access pipeline company attacked Native Americans with dogs and pepper spray as they protested against the $3.8 billion pipeline’s construction. If completed, the pipeline would carry about 500,000 barrels of crude per day from North Dakota’s Bakken oilfield to Illinois. The project has faced months of resistance from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe and members of nearly 100 more tribes from across the U.S. and Canada.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

ND: 2 Stop Dakota Access Construction by Locking Bodies to Machines + Iowa: 30 Arrested Blocking Dakota Access Pipeline Construction


September 01, 2016 Headlines

In North Dakota, eight people were arrested after two people locked themselves to heavy machinery to block construction of the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, which would carry 500,000 barrels of crude from the Bakken oilfields of North Dakota through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. It took the police hours to remove Dale American Horse Jr., who was locked to an excavator.

Iowa: 30 Arrested Blocking Dakota Access Pipeline Construction

Meanwhile, 30 people were arrested in Iowa in an effort to block construction of the Dakota Access pipeline there. And in Texas, members of the group Anti-Colonialists Against Billionaires say they poured superglue into the locks on the doors of the corporate offices of Energy Transfer Partners in Dallas before dawn on Wednesday.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Native Americans Hold Largest Gathering in a Century to Oppose Oil Pipeline


TheRealNews

Published on Sep 3, 2016

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Facing the Anthropocene: The Earth’s New Geological Era


TheRealNews

Published on Sep 4, 2016

Ian Angus, author of the new book Facing the Anthropocene, explains the significance of a new epoch marked by an unprecedented level of human impact on the Earth

See:

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Extinction: A Radical History: Ashley Dawson

Some thousands of years ago, the world was home to an immense variety of large mammals. From wooly mammoths and saber-toothed tigers to giant ground sloths and armadillos the size of automobiles, these spectacular creatures roamed freely. Then human beings arrived. Devouring their way down the food chain as they spread across the planet, they began a process of voracious extinction that has continued to the present.

Headlines today are made by the existential threat confronting remaining large animals such as rhinos and pandas. But the devastation summoned by humans extends to humbler realms of creatures including beetles, bats and butterflies. Researchers generally agree that the current extinction rate is nothing short of catastrophic. Currently the earth is losing about a hundred species every day.

This relentless extinction, Ashley Dawson contends in a primer that combines vast scope with elegant precision, is the product of a global attack on the commons, the great trove of air, water, plants and creatures, as well as collectively created cultural forms such as language, that have been regarded traditionally as the inheritance of humanity as a whole.

This attack has its genesis in the need for capital to expand relentlessly into all spheres of life. Extinction, Dawson argues, cannot be understood in isolation from a critique of our economic system. To achieve this we need to transgress the boundaries between science, environmentalism and radical politics. Extinction: A Radical History performs this task with both brio and brilliance.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Capitalism driving biodiversity loss to point of no return

Posted on August 24, 2016

Ashley Dawson: ‘Today’s mass extinction crisis is one of the clearest indications of the fundamental irrationality and destructiveness of the capitalist system.’

Ashley Dawson is the author of Extinction: A Radical History (OR Books, 2016). He was interviewed for Truthout by Mark Karlin.

Mark Karlin: How does capitalism’s inexorable and “ceaseless expansion” play a key role in the decimation of the environment and extinction of species?

Ashley Dawson: Capitalism is predicated on endless expansion. It is a socio-economic system that must grow indefinitely or cease to exist. And it has to grow at a compound rate, leading it to commodify and consume ever-greater portions of the planet at an accelerating velocity. Since we only have one planet, there is clearly a fundamental contradiction between our economic system and the environment upon which it, and all of humanity, ultimately depends. But since capitalism grows in a spatially uneven manner, some people can live obscenely affluent, insulated lives while other people face stark ecological catastrophe. But at some point, capitalism will take the entire planet past a point of ecological destruction from which there will be no return, at least on any time scale that is meaningful for human beings.

Current rates of extinction suggest that we are approaching that point. Looked at in historical perspective, species often go extinct, but, at the same time, new species are also constantly evolving in a process called speciation. At the moment, however, the rate of extinction far exceeds the rate of speciation. Studies suggest that over the last fifty years a shockingly high 40 percent of the world’s flora and fauna have become extinct. And this extinction rate is accelerating.

There are a number of factors that explain the dramatic mass extinction event that we are living through. By far the most important is habitat destruction. While all of the world’s ecosystems host myriad wonderfully diverse life forms, the greatest troves of biodiversity are concentrated in a few regions. The richest places on the planet in terms of biodiversity are tropical rainforests. And these rainforests are being burnt and chopped down at alarming rates.

…(read more).

See also:

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice