Daily Archives: July 20, 2016

2016 climate trends continue to break records

The first six months of 2016 were the warmest six-month period in NASA’s modern temperature record, which dates to 1880.
Credit: NASA/Goddard Institute for Space Studies

Date: July 19, 2016 Source: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center Summary: Two key climate change indicators — global surface temperatures and Arctic sea ice extent — have broken numerous records through the first half of 2016, according to NASA analyses of ground-based observations and satellite data.

Two key climate change indicators — global surface temperatures and Arctic sea ice extent — have broken numerous records through the first half of 2016, according to NASA analyses of ground-based observations and satellite data.

Each of the first six months of 2016 set a record as the warmest respective month globally in the modern temperature record, which dates to 1880, according to scientists at NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) in New York. The six-month period from January to June was also the planet’s warmest half-year on record, with an average temperature 1.3 degrees Celsius (2.4 degrees Fahrenheit) warmer than the late nineteenth century.

Five of the first six months of 2016 also set records for the smallest respective monthly Arctic sea ice extent since consistent satellite records began in 1979, according to analyses developed by scientists at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, in Greenbelt, Maryland. The one exception, March, recorded the second smallest extent for that month.

While these two key climate indicators have broken records in 2016, NASA scientists said it is more significant that global temperature and Arctic sea ice are continuing their decades-long trends of change. Both trends are ultimately driven by rising concentrations of heat-trapping carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

The extent of Arctic sea ice at the peak of the summer melt season now typically covers 40 percent less area than it did in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Arctic sea ice extent in September, the seasonal low point in the annual cycle, has been declining at a rate of 13.4 percent per decade.

“While the El Niño event in the tropical Pacific this winter gave a boost to global temperatures from October onwards, it is the underlying trend which is producing these record numbers,” GISS Director Gavin Schmidt said.

Previous El Niño events have driven temperatures to what were then record levels, such as in 1998. But in 2016, even as the effects of the recent El Niño taper off, global temperatures have risen well beyond those of 18 years ago because of the overall warming that has taken place in that time.

…(read more).

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Kevin Anderson on The Unforgiving Math For Staying Under 2 Degrees


The Elephant

Published on Feb 15, 2016

In the Paris accord, 195 countries agreed that they would collectively keep average global temperatures from rising more than 2 degrees. But what does science have to say on how fast, and by how much, will we have to cut our emissions to get there? Professor Kevin Anderson of the Tyndall Centre is a climate scientist who looks at exactly this question. And the math he comes away with, isn’t pretty.

Kevin Anderson shares his thoughts on what will need to happen if we are to meet the declarations in Paris, why it’s a matter of justice that we act, and why he personally has made the difficult decision to give up air travel.

Recorded for The Elephant Podcast
Subscribe in iTunes: http://bit.ly/elephantpod
www.elephantpodcast.com

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01 Introduction and Linda Pentz Gunter


EXCALIBURprdctns

Published on May 27, 2016

The introduction and first speaker – Linda Pentz Gunter – at the Beyond Nuclear conference held in Manchester in March 2016.

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Fukishima: No End in Sight for Nuclear Meltdown | Interview with Paul Gunter of Beyond Nuclear


breakingtheset

Published on Jun 27, 2014

Abby speaks with Paul Gunter, reactor oversight director at Beyond Nuclear, discussing the many unanswered questions surrounding the ongoing nuclear crisis at Fukushima Japan, including the construction of a massive underground ‘ice wall’ and the rate at which contaminated water continues to pour into the Pacific Ocean.

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600 Tons Of Nuclear Waste Is Missing!


The Big Picture RT

Published on Jun 9, 2016

Kevin Kamps, Beyond Nuclear joins Thom. In Nuke News… it’s been five years since the disaster at Fukushima and a TEPCO official announced recently that 600 TONS of highly radioactive nuclear fuel called “corium” from the Fukushima nuclear plant is simply missing. What’s scarier? Even if they could find the missing corium – Japan doesn’t even have the technology to extract the melted uranium fuel!

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Ban Ki-moon calls for improved preparedness for severe weather patterns


CCTV Africa

Published on Jul 20, 2016

UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon has warned that the world needs to brace it’s self for more severe changing weather patterns in 2017. Speaking at a high level forum on the issue, Ban says droughts and floods have devastated more than 60 million people globally. He’s called for more efforts in understanding the El-Nino weather phenomenon and says the world needs to prepare for another wave of changing weather patterns that will extend into 2017.

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Living in Denial: Climate Change, Emotions, and Everyday Life: Kari Marie Norgaard

Global warming is the most significant environmental issue of our time, yet public response in Western nations has been meager. Why have so few taken any action? In Living in Denial, sociologist Kari Norgaard searches for answers to this question, drawing on interviews and ethnographic data from her study of “Bygdaby,” the fictional name of an actual rural community in western Norway, during the unusually warm winter of 2000-2001.

In 2000-2001 the first snowfall came to Bygdaby two months later than usual; ice fishing was impossible; and the ski industry had to invest substantially in artificial snow-making. Stories in local and national newspapers linked the warm winter explicitly to global warming. Yet residents did not write letters to the editor, pressure politicians, or cut down on use of fossil fuels. Norgaard attributes this lack of response to the phenomenon of socially organized denial, by which information about climate science is known in the abstract but disconnected from political, social, and private life, and sees this as emblematic of how citizens of industrialized countries are responding to global warming.

Norgaard finds that for the highly educated and politically savvy residents of Bygdaby, global warming was both common knowledge and unimaginable. Norgaard traces this denial through multiple levels, from emotions to cultural norms to political economy. Her report from Bygdaby, supplemented by comparisons throughout the book to the United States, tells a larger story behind our paralysis in the face of today’s alarming predictions from climate scientists.

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