Daily Archives: July 13, 2016

West African Coastal Towns Swallowed by Ocean

E120, e130,

Restoring Ecological Health to Your Land (The Science and Practice of Ecological Restoration Series): Steven I. Apfelbaum, Alan W. Haney

Restoring Ecological Health to Your Land is the first practical guidebook to give restorationists and would-be restorationists with little or no scientific training or background the “how to” information and knowledge they need to plan and implement ecological restoration activities. The book sets forth a step-by-step process for developing, implementing, monitoring, and refining on-the-ground restoration projects that is applicable to a wide range of landscapes and ecosystems.

The first part of the book introduces the process of ecological restoration in simple, easily understood language through specific examples drawn from the authors’ experience restoring their own lands in southern and central Wisconsin. It offers systematic, step-by-step strategies along with inspiration and benchmark experiences. The book’s second half shows how that same “thinking” and “doing” can be applied to North America’s major ecosystems and landscapes in any condition or scale.

No other ecological restoration book leads by example and first-hand experience likethis one. The authors encourage readers to champion restoration of ecosystems close to where they live . . . at home, on farms and ranches, in parks and preserves. It provides an essential bridge for people from all walks of life and all levels of experience—from land trust member property stewards to agency personnel responsible for restoring lands in their care—and represents a unique and important contribution to the literature on restoration.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

The Restoring Ecological Health to Your Land Workbook (The Science and Practice of Ecological Restoration Series): Steven I. Apfelbaum, Alan W. Haney

Restoring Ecological Health to Your Land was the first practical guidebook to give restorationists and would-be restorationists with little or no scientific background the “how to” information and knowledge they need to plan and implement ecological restoration activities. The book sets forth a step-by-step process for developing, implementing, monitoring, and refining on-the-ground restoration projects that is applicable to a wide range of landscapes and ecosystems.

This companion workbook describes more fully the planning tools and techniques outlined in the book and offers a wealth of specific resources, including worksheets and spreadsheets to help you determine what equipment and plant materials you need, create project schedules, monitor results, and estimate costs. Online versions of the forms are available, making it even easier for you to incorporate them into your own projects. In addition, the authors and their network of professional advisers are offering free consulting sessions of up to one hour to purchasers of the book, giving you expert knowledge and experience that can help make your project a success.

Both books make the process of restoration accessible to everyone, from professional land managers to volunteer stewards. The tools offered will help you collect and process the information you need to make good decisions about your projects and are an invaluable resource for anyone thinking about or working on a hands-on restoration project.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Nature’s Second Chance: Restoring the Ecology of Stone Prairie Farm: Steven Apfelbaum

Renowned conservationist Aldo Leopold once wrote, “A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it does otherwise.”

Few have taken Leopold’s vision more to heart than Steven I. Apfelbaum, who has, over the last thirty years, transformed his eighty-acre Stone Prairie Farm in Wisconsin into a biologically diverse ecosystem of prairie, wetland, spring-fed brook, and savanna. In healing his land, Apfelbaum demonstrates how humans might play a starring role in healing the planet.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

David R. Montgomery – Soil Erosion: A Historical Perspective


USDA NRCS East National Technology Support Center

Published on Jul 6, 2016

Presented by:

David R. Montgomery, Ph.D., Professor, Quaternary Research Center and Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

View the webinar at http://conservationwebinars.net to earn CEUs.

Participants will gain an understanding of the impact soil erosion has had on civilization through time and what society needs to do to protect this precious resource.

Soil is the root of our existence, supporting our feet, our farms, and our cities. This presentation will reveal that we are running out of soil and, unlike civilizations in the past, there are no new regions to exploit. Dr. Montgomery will discuss the natural and cultural history of soil that sweeps from ancient civilizations to modern times, and he will explore the idea that we are—and have long been—using up Earth’s soil. Participants will learn how soil has shaped us and how we have shaped soil—as society after society has risen, prospered, and plowed through a natural endowment of fertile dirt.

This webinar is presented by USDA NRCS Science and Technology.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice