Daily Archives: June 26, 2016

A People’s Curriculum for the Earth: Teaching About the Environmental Crisis

https://www.amazon.com/Peoples-Curriculum-Earth-Teaching-Environmental/dp/0942961579/ref=ecoethicsA/

Five years in the making, A People’s Curriculum for the Earth is a collection of articles, role plays, simulations, stories, poems, and graphics to help breathe life into teaching about the environmental crisis. The book features some of the best articles from Rethinking Schools magazine alongside classroom-friendly readings on climate change, energy, water, food, and pollution–as well as on people who are working to make things better. At a time when it’s becoming increasingly obvious that life on Earth is at risk, here is a resource that helps students see what’s wrong and imagine solutions.

Chapter 1: The Whole Thing Is Connected
We can continue the enclosure of the commons, begun so long ago the privatization and commodification of nature or we can recognize the fundamental truth that we are all connected and that there is nothing private about how we treat the Earth, or each other.

Chapter 2: Grounding Our Teaching
Grounding our students in their communities doesn t just connect them to nature; it also connects them to the ways their communities have been battered by powerful interests, and how race and class have shaped those communities.

Chapter 3: Facing Climate Chaos
Articles in this chapter will help students recognize the significance of the climate crisis and see that the people being hit the hardest are the ones least responsible. Through various activities students consider root causes of the crisis in order to critically think about the deep social changes we will need to respond fairly and decisively.

Chapter 4: Burning the Future
Burning the Future has a metaphorical ring, but it s no metaphor it s literally true: We are burning the future. This chapter deals with the overall issue of fossil fuels and then is divided into three sections: coal, oil, and natural gas and fracking. Yes, we are burning the future. But nothing is inevitable. This is a key lesson from history, and from the activities included in this chapter.

Chapter 5: Teaching in a Toxic World
Articles in this chapter describe how toxic trespass happens in far too many ways in our lives here and around the world. Because of the intimate nature of the toxic trespass, students first reaction may be self-protection or individual consumer choices, rather than collective action. This chapter provides abundant evidence that people are taking collective action.

Chapter 6: Food, Farming, and the Earth
Food embodies many of the ecological problems and social injustices highlighted throughout the book. And similarly, it calls out for activism that recognizes the interconnectedness of these issues.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

Deadly California wildfire ravages homes


Al Jazeera English

Published on Jun 26, 2016
A wildfire that has already claimed the lives of at least two people and destroyed more than 100 homes continues to burn in California.
An emergency has been declared in the central part of the US state, where thousands more homes remain under threat.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

An Extraordinary Account of the Lynching of Black America (2003)


The Film Archives

Published on Jun 26, 2016

Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931), more commonly known as Ida B. Wells, was an African-American journalist, newspaper editor, suffragist, sociologist, feminist [1] Georgist,[2] and an early leader in the Civil Rights Movement. She was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909.

Born into slavery in Mississippi, as an adult she documented lynching in the United States in the 1890s, showing that it was often used as a way to control or punish blacks who competed with whites, rather than being based on criminal acts by blacks, as was usually claimed by whites.[3] She was active in women’s rights and the women’s suffrage movement, establishing several notable women’s organizations. Wells was a skilled and persuasive rhetorician and traveled internationally on lecture tours.[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ida_B._…

James Weldon Johnson (June 17, 1871 – June 26, 1938) was an American author, educator, lawyer, diplomat, songwriter, and civil rights activist. Johnson is best remembered for his leadership of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), where he started working in 1917. In 1920 he was the first African American to be chosen as executive secretary of the organization, effectively the operating officer.[1] He served in that position from 1920 to 1930. Johnson established his reputation as a writer, and was known during the Harlem Renaissance for his poems, novels, and anthologies collecting both poems and spirituals of black culture.

He was appointed under President Theodore Roosevelt as US consul in Venezuela and Nicaragua for most of the period from 1906 to 1913. In 1934 he was the first African-American professor to be hired at New York University.[2] Later in life he was a professor of creative literature and writing at Fisk University.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_W…

Walter Francis White (July 1, 1893 – March 21, 1955) was an American civil rights activist who led the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) for almost a quarter of a century and directed a broad program of legal challenges to racial segregation and disfranchisement. He was also a journalist, novelist, and essayist. He graduated in 1916 from Atlanta University (now Clark Atlanta University), a historically black college.

In 1918 he joined the small national staff of the NAACP in New York at the invitation of James Weldon Johnson. He acted as Johnson’s assistant national secretary and traveled to the South to investigate. White succeeded Johnson as the head of the NAACP, leading the organization from 1931 to 1955.

White oversaw the plans and organizational structure of the fight against public segregation. He worked with President Truman on desegregating the armed forces after the Second World War and gave him a draft for the Executive Order to implement this. Under White’s leadership, the NAACP set up its Legal Defense Fund, which raised numerous legal challenges to segregation and disfranchisement, and achieved many successes. Among these was the Supreme Court ruling in Brown v. Board of Education (1954), which determined that segregated education was inherently unequal. White also quintupled NAACP membership to nearly 500,000.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_…

William Edward Burghardt “W. E. B.” Du Bois (pronounced /duːˈbɔɪz/ doo-BOYZ; February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was an American sociologist, historian, civil rights activist, Pan-Africanist, author, and editor. Born in Great Barrington, Massachusetts, Du Bois grew up in a relatively tolerant and integrated community. After completing graduate work at the University of Berlin and Harvard, where he was the first African American to earn a doctorate, he became a professor of history, sociology and economics at Atlanta University. Du Bois was one of the co-founders of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) in 1909.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W._E._B…

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

China says won’t participate in South China Sea arbitration


CCTV Africa

Published on Jun 26, 2016

The Chinese government has once again made it clear that it will never recognize, accept, or participate in the South China Sea arbitration initiated by the Philippines. The case is the first of a neighbor challenging China’s territorial claims through international arbitration.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

Traditional rulers playing greater role in the globalized world


CCTV Africa

Published on Jun 26, 2016

The role of the African monarchy is changing dramatically. Some traditional rulers are playing a greater role in the globalized world in order to advocate for their people in many areas of development. One of the pioneers of this modernized monarchy is Ghanaian King Drolor Bosso Adamtey the First of the Se people.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

Yemenis facing severe food insecurity


Al Jazeera English

Published on Jun 26, 2016

Some 2.8 million Yemenis have been displaced by the civil war, and 80 percent of that population needs humanitarian aid, according to the UN.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics

Floods in US state of West Virginia kill 23


Al Jazeera English

Published on Jun 25, 2016
At least 23 people in West Virginia have died in flooding.
Up to 25 centimetres of rain fell in the US state on Thursday, causing rivers and streams to overflow.
Hundreds have been rescued from flooded homes.
Al Jazeera’s Alexi O’Brien reports.

Global Climate Change
Environmental Justice
Environment Ethics