Daily Archives: June 4, 2016

John Pilger on the Threat of World War Three (Going Underground)


RT

Published on Jun 4, 2016

Afshin Rattansi goes underground on the outcome of whoever wins the White House in November. Multi-award winning author and filmmaker John Pilger gives his take on the threat of World War Three as Britain’s defence secretary Michael Fallon jets off to Singapore for the Asian Security Conference where the keynote address will be given by US Defence Secretary Ash Carter.

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Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson Vol. I – V: Catalogue of the Library of Thomas Jefferson. 5 Vols.: E. Millicent Sowerby

Reprint of first edition. Originally published: Washington, DC: The Library of Congress, 1952-1959. 5 Vols. Illustrated. Commissioned to honor Jefferson’s 200th birthday, Sowerby’s monumental bibliography recreates the list of books Jefferson sold to the Library of Congress in 1815. It is based on Jefferson’s personal catalogue and the 1839 catalogue of the Library of Congress (the first to incorporate Jefferson’s books). Also known as the Sowerby Catalogue, this invaluable resource with extensive annotations is the most comprehensive and detailed bibliography of the largest and most important American library of the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries.

Available online from the:

Selected Special Collections

Thomas Jefferson’s Library

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Thomas Jefferson’s Garden Book: Thomas Jefferson, Edwin Morris Betts, Peter J. Hatch

Jefferson’s love of gardening is well known. In his day Jefferson not only planned but also worked in the gardens at Monticello, aided by his family members, slaves, and European workers. His delight in gardening is also revealed in his correspondence with leading horticulturists worldwide, bringing to Virginia curiosities such as peppers from Mexico, figs from France, and bean varieties collected by the Lewis and Clark expedition. Jefferson family letters are filled with a “garden gossip” that belies a child-like enthusiasm for the strawberries, tulips, and sugar maples at home. Of course, the greatest evidence of Jefferson’s horticultural passion thrives in the restored gardens at Monticello, admired the world over.

Thomas Jefferson’s Garden Book documents his varied approaches to gardening, whether as landscape architect, pleasure gardener, or horticultural scientist. In his Garden Book, the horticultural diary which he kept from 1766 until 1824, Jefferson noted such observations as how the gardens were sown, the extent of frost damage to his and other area gardens, and when vegetables came “to table.”

To these detailed but lapsing records, the late Edwin Morris Betts, professor of biology at the University of Virginia, added his own commentary, as well as selections from Jefferson’s other writings–compelling letters, unpublished memoranda, sketches, and related entries from Jefferson’s Farm, Account, Weather, and Memorandum Books. Completing this collection is a new introduction by Peter J. Hatch, Director of Gardens and Grounds at Monticello for more than two decades.

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The Farm Book by Thomas Jefferson with light notes and annotations by Sam Sloan

The Farm Book is the primary source for all studies about Thomas Jefferson and his slaves. It is a notebook kept and maintained by Thomas Jefferson from 1774 until just before his death in 1826. Unlike his letters and correspondence which Thomas Jefferson clearly intended to be kept for posterity, the Farm Book contains his private notes that he probably never imagined would be scrutinized and studied by future generations. The “Farm Book” derives its name from those two words that were written on the inside cover. The Farm Book starts with the genealogy of his favorite horse, Caractacus. It then moves on to the first inventory of the Slaves of Thomas Jefferson: “A Roll of the proper slaves of Thomas Jefferson, Jan. 14. 1774.” There are 29 slaves listed here.

After Thomas Jefferson had inherited slaves from his father, his mother, his father-and-law and his wife, after they all died, the number of his slaves grew to 187, the most famous of whom was Sally Hemings, his presumed mistress. The question of whether Thomas Jefferson really fathered children by Sally Hemings remains controversial.

However, putting that aside, a little appreciated fact is that the majority of slaves of Thomas Jefferson were not at Monticello but were at Poplar Forest, in what is now Lynchburg, Virginia. After Thomas Jefferson died in 1826, the slaves at Monticello were sold at auction and were widely disbursed, with the exceptions only of Sally Hemings and her two remaining sons. This was because the land around Monticello was not suitable for cultivation. However, the slaves at Poplar Forest, where the best farmland was, stayed right where they were. Their descendants are still there today, where they attend Jefferson Forest High School. The Farm Book, which groups slaves by their slave families, with husband, wife and children grouped together, needs to be studied in detail by anybody interested in the genealogy of these slave families.

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Permaculture Project | A System for Sustainable Life BBC | Interesting Documentary Films


Interesting Documentary Films

Published on Mar 21, 2016

Permaculture Project | A System for Sustainable Life BBC | Interesting Documentary Films

Permaculture is a system of agricultural and social design principles centered around simulating or directly utilizing the patterns and features observed in natural ecosystems. The term permaculture (as a systematic method) was first coined by Australians David Holmgren, then a graduate student, and his professor, Bill Mollison, in 1978. The word permaculture originally referred to “permanent agriculture”,[1] but was expanded to stand also for “permanent culture”, as it was understood that social aspects were integral to a truly sustainable system as inspired by Masanobu Fukuoka’s natural farming philosophy.
It has many branches that include but are not limited to ecological design, ecological engineering, environmental design, construction and integrated water resources management that develops sustainable architecture, regenerative and self-maintained habitat and agricultural systems modeled from natural ecosystems.

Read more about “Permaculture Project | A System for Sustainable Life BBC | Interesting Documentary Films”:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Permacu…

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The Power of Permaculture | Ryan Harb


TEDx Talks

Published on Sep 18, 2015

Ryan Harb shares his experience creating the first Public University Permaculture Garden in the nation and explains how we can use permaculture to empower ourselves and make a difference in our community and the world.

Ryan Harb is a certified permaculture designer, community organizer and was the first person in the nation to receive a Master of Science degree in Green Building. In 2010, Harb created a job for himself as Sustainability Manager for UMass Amherst Dining Services. He then began developing one of the first university permaculture gardens
in the nation that supplies locally grown produce and hands-on sustainability education to the campus and local community.

Within 18 months, “The UMass Permaculture Initiative” went viral and was featured in over 100 media publications including the New York Times, Boston Globe, Huffington Post, and on MTV. The project has engaged over 3,500 volunteers and won 8 national awards. In 2012, Harb was invited to the White House to meet and speak alongside President Barack Obama. He was named a “White House Campus Champion of Change”, and UMass Permaculture was voted the top university program in the country that’s changing the world for the better.

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Full Version UMass Permaculture Documentary Video


Ryan Harb

Published on Oct 13, 2013

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