Daily Archives: May 20, 2016

Canada Approves Sale of Genetically Modified Salmon

May 20, 2016 Headlines
Meanwhile, the Canadian Food Inspection Agency has approved a genetically modified salmon for sale as food. It’s the first genetically modified animal approved in the country. AquAdvantage salmon was developed by Massachusetts-based AquaBounty Technologies. They grow twice as fast as natural salmon.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

TPP Has Failed American Jobs – Here Are the Numbers…


The Big Picture RT

Published on May 19, 2016

Ben Beachy, The Sierra Club & Dan Mauer, Communications Workers of America (CWA) all join Thom. For years now President Obama has sold the TPP as a different type of trade deal – one that would actually create jobs. But what do the numbers say?

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Our Country HAS Been Run Like A Business!


thomhartmann

Published on May 20, 2016

Thom talks to caller Carl, who thinks it’s time Republicans realize that our nation has been run like a business.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

W.H.O. calls for urgent action to prevent further Yellow Fever spread

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJ4cnupb5D8
CCTV Africa

Published on May 20, 2016

The World Health Organization has declared the urban yellow fever outbreaks in Angola and the DRC a serious public health event. Speaking to reporters in Geneva Thursday, W.H.O.’s Director of Health Emergencies Bruce Aylward said the disease seems to be spreading fast and could pose serious threat if it continues to do so. There have been about 300 reported deaths and 2400 suspect cases in just four months, reinforcing the potentially explosive nature of the disease. W.H.O. is now urging its members to enforce vaccination requirements for those travelling to the affected countries.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice
Public Health

Why Is Hubble Taking Pictures Of Mars? – Exclusive Interview


VideoFromSpace

Published on May 20, 2016

NASA’s Dr. Jennifer Wiseman explains why capturing imagery of the Red Planet with the Hubble Space Telescope is still important, even with the multiple missions studying it on the surface and from orbit. Mars is at opposition on May 22, 2016 and its closest approach to Earth occurs on May 30th.

2016 is a great time to see Mars from Earth- Find out more here: http://goo.gl/b0krCy

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Getting to the Next System: Guideposts on the Way to a New Political Economy – Gus Speth

How can we address problems that sometimes seem unsolvable? How to lift families mired in generations of poverty to a better life? Stop the .ow of carbon into our atmosphere? Or remove corporate in.uence from our politics? ese are problems so large some are resigned to enduring, rather than confronting, them. But surely that is not the best course. e road ahead is full of possibilities. To navigate it well we must pay attention to its deep, entrapping .ssures and .nd new ways around them. e good news is that many Americans now recognize the scale of these challenges, and interest is high in .nding out how we might address them.

I certainly don’t think I have all the answers, but I do believe I can help .nd a place to begin. After over forty years of working in the environmental movement and in international development, I have come to the conclusion that our largest problems—from climate change to inequality and poverty—are deeply rooted in the fundamentals of our political-economic system. Working within that system to achieve incremental changes, however valuable, will never be enough. e current system is simply not programmed to secure the well-being of people, place, and planet. Its priorities, as we see every day, are GDP growth, corporate pro.ts, and the projection of national power—typically military power.

…(read more).

Sustainability Leaders Build On Climate Momentum Tue, May 10, 2016

  • Stories that shine a light on how healthy ecosystems have the power to transform the planet and its people – the overarching theme at this year’s United Nations Environment Assembly

United Nations Environment Assembly President Delivers Keynote Address at Climate Action 2016 Summit

6 May 2016, Washington, D.C. – The Climate Action 2016 Summit convened more than 600 global leaders from the government, business, philanthropy, multilateral institutions and civil society from 5-6 May in Washington, DC. The Summit showcased cross-cutting and innovative strategies that were being undertaken to make the Paris Agreement a success, as well as the ambitious and unprecedented efforts across all sectors required for its implementation.

“Urgent action is critical for meeting the climate challenge and building a clean energy, climate-resilient future,” said Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General of the United Nations. “This event underscores the importance of partnerships to achieve these goals and to forge a safer, healthier and more prosperous future for all people.”

Dr. Oyun Sanjaasuren, President of the UN Environment Assembly, was the closing keynote speaker on the “Vision for a Resilient Future, ” where she highlighted the Secretary General’s Climate Resilience: A2R (Anticipate, Absorb, Reshape) global initiative, and the role of UNEA in further advancing action on climate change and the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda. In addition to her speaking engagement, Dr. Sanjaasuren also participated in a live streamed media briefing in conversation with the UNEP Regional Director for North America, Patricia Beneke. She was also interviewed by the World Bank’s Connect for Climate, the Global Environment Facility, and People’s Haus on youth which was live streamed on Facebook.

…(read more).

Ahead of UN Environment Assembly UNEP Says Cost of Adapting to Climate Change Could Hit $500 Billion per year by 2050 – UNEP

Tue, May 10, 2016

UNEP’s Adaptation Finance Gap Report: Failure to cut emissions will dramatically increase the annual costs of adaptation, which could be up to five times higher by 2050 than previously thought.

Photo Credit: Michael Foley

Rotterdam, 10 May 2016 – The cost of adapting to climate change in developing countries could rise to between $280 and $500 billion per year by 2050, a figure that is four to five times greater than previous estimates, according to a new United Nations Environment (UNEP) report.

Released as nations sign the landmark Paris Agreement on climate change, the report assesses the difference between the financial costs of adapting to climate change in developing countries and the amount of money actually available to meet these costs – a difference known as the “adaptation finance gap”.

Further Resources

The report, the second in UNEP’s series of Adaptation Gap reports, finds that total bilateral and multilateral funding for climate change adaptation in developing countries has risen substantially in the five years leading up to 2014, reaching $22.5 billion. But the report warns that, despite this increase, there will be a significant funding gap by 2050 unless new and additional finance for adaptation is made available.

“It is vital that governments understand the costs involved in adapting to climate change,” said Ibrahim Thiaw, Deputy Executive Director of the United Nations Environment Programme.

Rate of Environmental Damage Increasing Across the Planet but There Is Still Time to Reverse Worst Impacts if Governments Act Now, UNEP Assessment Says – UNEP

Thu, May 19, 2016

Landmark UNEP Assessment Puts State of the World’s Environment under the Microscope

Nairobi, 19 May 2016 – The environmental change sweeping the world is occurring at a faster pace than previously thought, making it imperative that governments act now to reverse the damage being done to the planet, says the most authoritative study that UNEP has ever published on the state of the global environment.

Under the title Global Environmental Outlook (GEO-6): Regional Assessments, six separate reports provide highly detailed examinations of the environmental issues affecting each of the world’s six regions: the Pan-European region, North America, Asia and the Pacific, West Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Africa.

Further Resources

Released ahead of the United Nations Environment Assembly, the regional assessments find that the world shares a host of common environmental threats that are rapidly intensifying in many parts of the world.

In almost every region, population growth, rapid urbanization, rising levels of consumption, desertification, land degradation and climate change have combined to leave countries suffering from severe water scarcity. These worrying trends are also making it increasingly hard for the world to feed itself, warn the reports, which involved 1,203 scientists, hundreds of scientific institutions and more than 160 governments.

The Executive Director of UNEP, Achim Steiner, said: “Today, thanks to this report, we now know more about the state of the world’s environment than ever before. With these assessments, UNEP has presented the world with the very latest evidence on the state of the world’s environment, providing them with the tools they need anticipate and avoid the damage that is being done to our planet.

“If current trends continue and the world fails to enact solutions that improve current patterns of production and consumption, if we fail to use natural resources sustainably, then the state of the world’s environment will continue to decline. It is essential that we understand the pace of environmental change that is upon us and that we start to work with nature instead of against it to tackle the array of environmental threats that face us.”

The assessments, which are based on scientific data and peer reviewed literature, find that there is still time to tackle many of the worst impacts of environmental change, such as the damage to marine ecosystems and the rising level of air pollution, which has become one of the world’s most widespread environmental health risks.

Across the world, climate change, the loss of biodiversity, land degradation and water scarcity are growing problems that need to be urgently addressed if the world is to achieve the goals set out in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the reports state.

….(read more).

See:

United Nations News Centre – Earth’s health declining ‘faster than thought’ but ac tion by governments can reverse trend – UN

 

Burnt and degraded forest within Tesso Nilo National Park, Riau Province, Sumatra, Indonesia. Photo: World Bank/Flore de Preneuf

19 May 2016 – The environment is deteriorating faster than previously thought, making it imperative that governments act now to reverse the worst trends, says the most authoritative study the United Nations has ever published on the state of the planet’s health.

The Global Environmental Outlook (GEO-6): Regional Assessments is a compilation of six separate reports, which provide highly detailed examinations of the environmental issues affecting each of the world’s six regions: the Pan-European region, North America, Asia and the Pacific, West Asia, Latin America and the Caribbean, and Africa, the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) said in a press release.

Published ahead of the UN Environment Assembly, taking place in Nairobi, Kenya, from 23-27 May, the regional assessments, which involved 1,203 scientists, hundreds of scientific institutions and more than 160 governments, find that the world shares a host of common environmental threats that are rapidly intensifying in many parts of the world.

Across the planet, climate change, the loss of biodiversity, land degradation and water scarcity are growing problems that need to be urgently addressed if the world is to achieve the goals set out in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the studies find.

“Today, thanks to this report, we now know more about the state of the world’s environment than ever before,” said UNEP Executive Director Achim Steiner. “It is essential that we understand the pace of environmental change that is upon us.”

The assessments find that there is still time to tackle many of the worst impacts of environmental change, such as the damage to marine ecosystems and the rising level of air pollution, which has become one of the world’s most widespread environmental health risks.

As one of the first areas of the world to experience the impacts of climate change, the Arctic region serves as a barometer for change in the rest of the world. Warming in the Arctic has increased at twice the global average since 1980.

The largest contributions to global glacier ice loss during the early 21st century were from glaciers in Alaska, the Canadian Arctic, and the periphery of the Greenland ice sheet, as well as in the Southern Andes and Asian mountains. Together these areas account for more than 80 per cent of the total ice loss.

….(read more).

See:

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice