Daily Archives: April 7, 2016

The Future of Food: What Every Person Should Know with Deborah Garcia


Dan Harayda

Uploaded on Apr 28, 2011

What should every person know about the food they ingest. The documentary “The Future of Food” changed the way we think about food(and continues to do so) by answering this very question.

But, just how has food actually changed? Do we need to worry about genetically modified foods? What about artificial foods? Learn all this more as Kurt Olson, host of the Educational Forum, sits down with Deborah Garcia the award winning creator of “The Future of Food.”

The Massachusetts School of Law at Andover

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Oxford Climate Society

The Oxford Climate Society is a University of Oxford society dedicated to developing informed climate leaders.

Our membership extends from students to professionals and the general public, welcoming all levels of interest and experience.

Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Oxford Climate Forum

The Oxford Climate Forum 2015 is now over, we’d like to thank everyone who took part.
Check out our YouTube Channel for Bill McKibben’s video and speaker presentations from the day.
More footage will be coming soon! In the meantime, watch That’s Oxford TV’s coverage of the event.

Please fill in our short climateforumto let us know your thoughts.
Drop a line tosarah.feldman if you liked what you saw and want to know about being involved next year!

Oxford Climate Forum is brought to you by Oxford Hub. If you would like to hear about more exciting events and opportunities, please sign up via our mailing list button below.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

BBC Future of Food

BBC Future of Food – Part 1: India
Moonray

Uploaded on Feb 27, 2012

Future of Food – Part 1: India
In the past year, we have seen food riots on three continents, food inflation has rocketed and experts predict that by 2050, if things don’t change, we will see mass starvation across the world. This film sees George Alagiah travel the world in search of solutions to the growing global food crisis.
From the two women working to make their Yorkshire market town self-sufficient to the academic who claims it could be better for the environment to ship in lamb from New Zealand, George Alagiah meets the people who believe they know how we should feed the world as demand doubles by the middle of the century.

George joins a Masai chief among the skeletons of hundreds of cattle he has lost to climate change and the English farmer who tells him why food production in the UK is also hit. He spends a day eating with a family in Cuba to find out how a future oil shock could lead to dramatic adjustments to diets. He visits the breadbasket of India to meet the farmer who now struggles to irrigate his land as water tables drop, and finds out why obesity is spiralling out of control in Mexico.
Back in Britain, George investigates what is wrong with people’s diets, and discovers that the UK imports an average of 3000 liters of water per capita every day. He talks to top nutritionist Susan Jebb, DEFRA minister Hilary Benn and Nobel laureate Rajendra Pachauri to uncover what the future holds for our food.

BBC Future of Food – Part 2: Senegal


Moonray

Uploaded on Feb 27, 2012

Future of Food – Part 2: Senegal
George heads out to India to discover how a changing diet in the developing world is putting pressure on the world’s limited food resources. He finds out how using crops to produce fuel is impacting on food supplies across the continents. George then meets a farmer in Kent, who is struggling to sell his fruit at a profit, and a British farmer in Kenya who is shipping out tones of vegetables for our supermarket shelves. He also examines why so many people are still dying of hunger after decades of food aid.
Back in the UK, George challenges the decision-makers with the facts he has uncovered — from Oxfam head of research Duncan Green to Sainsbury’s boss Justin King. He finds out why British beef may offer a model for future meat production and how our appetite for fish is stripping the world’s seas bare.

Future of Food -Part 3: Cuba

Moonray

Uploaded on Feb 27, 2012
In the final episode George Alagiah heads out to Havana to find out how they are growing half of their fruit and vegetables right in the heart of the city, investigates the ‘land-grabs’ trend — where rich countries lease or buy up the land used by poor farmers in Africa — and meets the Indian agriculturalists who have almost trebled their yields over the course of a decade.
George finds out how we in this country are using cutting-edge science to extend the seasons recycle our food waste and even grow lettuce in fish tanks to guarantee the food on our plates.
He hears the arguments about genetically modified food and examines even more futuristic schemes to get the food on to our plates.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

Documentary. The Dark Side Of Chocolate


MsKandyrose’s channel

Uploaded on Jan 21, 2012

The Chocolate Industry. Child Trafficing & Slavery

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

The Dark Side of Fast Food: Why Does It Make You Sick / Fat / Tired / Taste So Good (2001)


The Film Archives

Published on Aug 21, 2013

Fast Food Nation: The Dark Side of the All-American Meal (2001) is a book by investigative journalist Eric Schlosser that examines the local and global influence of the United States fast food industry.

First serialized by Rolling Stone in 1999, the book has drawn comparisons to Upton Sinclair’s classic muckraking novel The Jungle. The book was adapted into a film of the same name, directed by Richard Linklater.

The book is divided into two sections, “The American Way,” which interrogates the beginnings of the Fast Food Nation within the context of post-World War II America; and “Meat and Potatoes,” which examines the specific mechanizations of the fast-food industry, including the chemical flavoring of the food, the production of cattle and chickens, the working conditions of beef industry, the dangers of eating meat, and the global context of fast food as an American cultural export.

Fast Food Nation opens with discussion of Carl N. Karcher and the McDonalds brothers, examining their roles as pioneers of the fast-food industry in southern California. This discussion is followed by an examination of Ray Kroc and Walt Disney’s complicated relationship as well as each man’s rise to fame. This chapter also considers the intricate, profitable methods of advertising to children. Next, Schlosser visits Colorado Springs, CO and investigates the life and working conditions of the typical fast-food industry employee: fast-food restaurants employ the highest rate of low-wage workers, have among the highest turnover rates, and pay minimum wage to a higher proportion of its employees than any other American industry.

The second section of the text begins with a discussion of the chemical components that make the food taste so good. Schlosser follows this with a discussion of the life of a typical rancher, considering the difficulties presented to the agriculture world in a new economy. Schlosser is perhaps most provocative when he critiques the meatpacking industry, which he tags as the most dangerous job in America. Moreover, the meat produced by slaughterhouses has become exponentially more hazardous since the centralization of the industry: the way cattle are raised, slaughtered, and processed provides an ideal setting for E coli to spread. Additionally, working conditions continue to grow worse. In the final chapter, Schlosser considers how fast food has matured as an American cultural export following the Cold War: the collapse of Soviet Communism has allowed the mass spread of American goods and services, especially fast food. As a result, the rest of the world is catching up with America’s rising obesity rates.

The book continues with an account of the evolution of fast food and how it has coincided with the advent of the automobile. Schlosser explains the transformation from countless independent restaurants to a few uniform franchises. “The extraordinary growth of the fast food industry has been driven by fundamental changes in American society… During that period, women entered the workforce in record numbers, often motivated less by a feminist perspective than by a need to pay the bills. In 1975, about one-third of American mothers with young children worked outside the home; today almost two-thirds of such mothers are employed. As the sociologists Cameron Lynne Macdonald and Carmen Sirianni have noted, the entry of so many women into the workforce has greatly increased demand for the types of services that housewives traditionally perform: cooking, cleaning, and child care. A generation ago, three-quarters of the money used to buy food in the United States was spent to prepare meals at home. Today about half of the money used to buy food is spent at restaurants – mainly at fast food restaurants.”

Regarding the topic of child-targeted marketing, Schlosser explains how the McDonald’s Corporation modeled its marketing tactics on The Walt Disney Company, which inspired the creation of advertising icons such as Ronald McDonald and his sidekicks. Marketing executives intended that this marketing shift would result not only in attracting children, but their parents and grandparents as well. More importantly, the tactic would instill brand loyalty that would persist through adulthood through nostalgic associations to McDonald’s. Schlosser also discusses the tactic’s ills: the exploitation of children’s naïveté and trusting nature.

In marketing to children, Schlosser suggests, corporations have infiltrated schools through sponsorship and quid pro quo. He sees that reductions in corporate taxation have come at the expense of school funding, thereby presenting many corporations with the opportunity for sponsorship with those same schools. According to his sources, 80% of sponsored textbooks contain material that is biased in favor of the sponsors, and 30% of high schools offer fast foods in their cafeterias.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice

The World According to Monsanto Full Length


rataMacue22

Uploaded on Jan 4, 2011

Full length documentary exposing the massive corruption and conspiracy in our food industry.

Food-Matters
Global Climate Change
Environment Ethics
Environment Justice